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Full text of "State record North Carolina"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

NCSU Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/staterecordnorth1991nort 



'mber 1990 



North 
Carolina 
State 
University 




3ULLETIN 

Undergraduate Catalog 
1991 - 1993 



This catalog is intended for informational purposes only. Requirements, rules, 
procedures, courses and informational statements set forth herein are subject to 
change. Notice of changes will be conveyed to duly enrolled students and other 
appropriate persons at the time such changes are effected. 



NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY BULLETIN 

(USPS 393-040) 

VOLUME 90 DECEMBER 1990 NUMBER 4 

Published weekly by North Carolina State University, Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 112 Peele Hall. Box 7103. 
Raleigh. N.C. 2769.5-7103. Second class postage paid at Raleigh, N.C. 27611. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to 
North Carolina State University, Box 7103. Raleigh. NC 27695-7103. 




North Carolina State University 



Undergraduate 
Catalog 



1991-93 



Contents 

North Carolina State University 5 

NCSU Administration and Offices 8 

Academic Calendar H 

Academic Fields of Study and Degrees 15 

Natural Resources Curricula 21 

Arts Studies 22 

Honors and Scholars Programs 23 

Scholarships 24 

Special Academic Programs 26 

International Programs and Activities 30 

Admissions 34 

Orientation 39 

Registration 40 

Tuition and Fees 41 

Financial Aid 46 

Student Housing 48 

Academic Policies and Procedures 50 

Code of Conduct 65 

Student Services 65 

Student Activities 69 

Programs of Study 75 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 79 

School of Design 129 

College of Education and Psychology 138 

College of Engineering 166 

College of Forest Resources 199 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 217 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 244 

College of Textiles 262 

College of Veterinary Medicine 279 

Music Department 282 

Military Education and Training 282 

Graduate School 286 

Adult Credit Programs and Summer Sessions 287 

University Extension and Public Service 287 

University Libraries 290 

University Computing 291 

Research Triangle 291 

Research Centers and Facilities 292 

University Development 300 

University Relations 302 

The Alumni Association 303 

Course Descriptions 314 

The University of North Carolina 493 

Historical Sketch of NCSU 495 



NCSU Role and Mission Statement 497 

Policy on Illegal Drugs 499 

NCSU Board of Trustees 502 

NCSU Administrative Council 502 

NCSU Faculty and Other Academic Personnel 503 

NCSU Emeritus Faculty 546 

Index 554 

Campus Map 560 






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j46ove is an aerial view of the central 

campus of North Carolina State 

University viewed east to west. The 

strong diagonal in the foreground is 

Hillsborough Street, which forms the 

north border. In the lower left is the 

Memorial Tower, a prominent 

landmark which commemorates 

World War I dead. 



Dr. Larry K. Monteith is North 
Carolina State University's 
eleventh chancellor. 



North Carolina 
State University 



North Carolina State University is a national center for research, teaching, 
and extension in the sciences and technologies, in the humanities and social 
sciences, and in a wide range of professional programs. 

Founded March 7, 1887, by the North Carolina General Assembly under the 
provisions of the national Land-Grant Act, the University has marked more than 
a century of service to the state and the nation. Sharing the distinctive character 
of Land-Grant universities nationwide. North Carolina State University has 
broad academic offerings, national and international linkages, and large-scale 
public service, extension, and research activities. 

The university is organized into eight colleges, the School of Design, and the 
Graduate School. The colleges are Agriculture and Life Sciences, Education and 
Psychology, Engineering, Forest Resources, Humanities and Social Sciences, 
Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Textiles, and Veterinary Medicine. These 
colleges and schools offer baccalaureate degrees in 89 fields, master's degrees in 
77 fields, and doctoral degrees in 48 fields. Together with more than 30 research 
centers and institutes, these colleges and schools also support a broad spectrum of 
more than 1,200 scientific, technological, and scholarly research endeavors. 

Extension units carry teaching and research programs to each of North Caro- 
lina's 100 counties and the Cherokee Indian Reservation. Extension credit 
courses were delivered live and by cable, video, and satellite to 34 states and the 
District of Columbia, as well as to England, France, Spain, Switzerland, Mexico, 
Canada, Cyprus, and New Zealand. 

The central campus of the University, located west of the downtown area of 
Raleigh, consists of 145 major buildings on 700 acres. Adjacent to the central 
campus are the new 940-acre Centennial Campus and the College of Veterinary 
Medicine campus. Nearby are research farms; biology and ecology sites; genet- 
ics, horticulture, and floriculture nurseries; forests; and Carter-Finley Stadium 
that together comprise 2,700 acres. Elsewhere across the state are research 
farms, a research forest of 82,000 acres, and the Chinqua-Penn Plantation. 

North Carolina State University is one of the three Research Triangle universi- 
ties along with Duke University in Durham and the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill. Within the 30-mile triangle formed by the three universities is the 
5,000-acre Research Triangle Park, location of many public research agencies 
and private research centers of national and international corporations. The 
Triangle Universities Computation Center, a central facility for the extensive 
computing activities of the universities, also is located in the Park. 

The University has approximately 8,200 employees. Faculty and other aca- 
demic personnel total 2,686, including 1,834 graduate faculty. Among the many 
honors and recognitions received by members of the faculty are seven member- 
ships in the National Academy of Science and four in the National Academy of 
Engineering, 37 named professorships, 19 university distinguished professor- 
ships, 57 Alumni Distinguished Professors, and currently over 200 members of 
the Academy of Outstanding Teachers. 



I n the 1990 fall semester, the University's headcount enrollment totaled 26,683. 
Included in this number were 18,294 students in undergraduate degree pro- 
grams. 4.142 in graduate degree programs, and 4,247 life-long education stu- 
dents. The combined undergraduate and graduate enrollments by college were: 
Agriculture and Life Sciences— 3.371; Design— 594; Education and Psychol- 
ogy— 1.494; Engineering— 7.243; Forest Resources— 678; Humanities and Social 
Sciences— 5.875: Physical and Mathematical Sciences— 1,199; Textiles— 846; 
and Veterinary Medicine— 326. There were 351 students in the University Unde- 
signated Program, 158 in the University Transition Program, and 301 in the 
two-year Agriculture Institute Program. The total student population included 
2.332 African-American students; 1,032 other minority students, and 10,473 
female students. Students at the University come from 48 states, three U.S. 
territories, and approximately 90 foreign countries. The international enroll- 
ment is a distinctive feature of the institution as more than 1.100 international 
students give the campus a cosmopolitan atmosphere. 

Each year the University provides its students with a wide range of opportuni- 
ties for exposure to the arts. These include the Friends of the College concert 
series in Reynolds Coliseum; the professional music, theatre, dance, and film 
series offered by Stewart Theatre; a series of exhibitions of painting, photo- 
graphy, textiles, and sculpture in the galleries of the University Student Center; 
and a Musician-in-Residence program that brings an artist to the campus each 
year for formal and informal performances and interaction with students. 

The University's "Wolfpack" athletic teams are well-known nationally. The 
men's basketball team won national championships in 1974 and in 1983 and hold 
10 Atlantic Coast Conference titles. The football team has been the Atlantic Coast 
Conference champion five times, co-champion twice, and has played in 13 bowl 
games. The Wolfpack women's cross country team won national championships 
in 1979 and 1980. while the men's and women's soccer teams have both advanced 
to the NCAA's "final four" in the last five years. The women's basketball team. 
under the direction of 1988 U.S. Olympic gold-medal winning coach Kay Yow, 
has played in 10 of 13 ACC title games. The wrestling and men's track teams have 
each won eight ACC titles while the men's swim team has claimed 23 conference 
championships. Providing additional color and spirit for the games, the cheer- 
leading squad was twice recognized as national champions. Numerous individ- 
ual NCSU athletes have won NCAA titles, national championships, and interna- 
tional honors, including medals in the last four Olympic Games in which the 
United States has competed. 

The University is a member of the National Association of State Universities 
and Land-(jrant Colleges, the American Council on Education, the American 
Council of Learned Societies, the Association of Governing Boards of Universities 
and Colleges, the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, the International Univer- 
sity Consortium for Telecommunications in Learning, the North Carolina Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Universities, and the Cooperating Raleigh Colleges. 

North Carolina State University is committed to equality of educational oppor- 
tunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or employees based 
on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. Moreover, North 
Carolina State University is open to people of all races and actively seeks to 



promote racial integration by recruiting and enrolling a larger number of 
African-American students. 



ACCREDITATION 

North Carolina State University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges 
of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. In addition, many of the 
university's professional programs and departments are accredited by national 
professional associations, including: 

Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology 

American Association for Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care 

American Chemical Society 

American Veterinary Medical Association 

Computer Science Accreditation Commission 

Council on Social Work Education 

Landscape Architectural Accrediting Board 

National Architectural Accrediting Board 

National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration 

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education 

National Recreation and Park Association 

Society of American Foresters 

Society of Wood Science and Technology 

NONDISCRIMINATION POLICY 

North Carolina State University is dedicated to equality of opportunity within 
its community. Accordingly. North Carolina State University does not practice 
or condone discrimination, in any form, against students, employees, or appli- 
cants on the grounds of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, or handicap. 
North Carolina State University commits itself to positive action to secure 
equal opportunity regardless of those characteristics. 

North Carolina State University supports the protection available to members 
of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, 
Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age 
Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Vietnam Veteran's 
Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974, and Executive Order 11246. 
For information concerning these provisions, contact: 

Lawrence M. Clark 

Affirmative Action Officer 

201 Holladay Hall 

Box 7101 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh. North Carolina 27695-7101 

Phone: (919) 737-3409 or 737-3148 



NCSU Administration and Offices 



CHANCELLORS OFFICE 

Larry K. Monteith, Chancellor 
Harold B. Hopfenberg, Executive 

Asui.-itant to the Chancellor 
Claude E. McKinney, Special 

Assijitant to the Chancellor, 

Centennial Campus 
Karen P. Helm, Assistant to the 

Chancellor and Director of 

Unirersity Planning 
Alumni Relations 

Bryce R. Younts, Director 
Legal Affairs 
Becky R. French, General Counsel 

PROVOST'S OFFICE 

Franklin D. Hart, Interim Provost 

and Vice Chancellor 
Lawrence M. Clark, Associate Provost 

and Affirmative Action Officer 
Murray S. Downs, Associate Provost 

for Undergraduate Programs 
Henry E. Schaffer, Associate Pro- 
vost for Academic Computing 
Augustus M. Witherspoon, Associate 
Provost for Special Programs — 
Minorities 
Rebecca Leonard, Interim Assistant 

Provost for First Year Experience 
Karin L. W oUe, Assistant Affirmative 
Action Officer 
Adult Credit Program Development 
Nancy E. Polk, Assistant Director 
Computing Center 

Carl W. Malstrom, Director 
International Programs 

J. Lawrence Apple, Coordinator 
Institutional Research 

Richard D. Howard, Director 
Summer Sessions and Adult Credit 
Progra ms 

John F. Cudd, Director 
Undergraduate Admissions 
George R. Dixon, Director 
University Libraries 
Susan K. Nutter, Director 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND 
LIFE SCIENCES 

Durwood F. Bateman. Dean 
James L. Oblinger, Associate Dean 

and Director, Acadeynic Affairs 
Chester D. Black, Associate Dean 
and Director, Agricultural Exten- 
sion Service 



Ronald, J. Kuhr, Associate Dean 
and Director. Agricultural Re- 
search Sennce 

Robert E. Cook. Assistant Dean 

SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

J. Thomas Regan. Dean 

Deborah W. Dalton, Associate Dean 

J. Patrick Rand, Assistant Dean 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Joan J. Michael, Dean 

Robert T. Williams, Associate Dean 

for Academ ic Affairs 
Hubert A. Exum, Associate Dean for 

Research and Graduate Studies 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

James K. Ferrell, Interim Dean 
Tildon H. Glisson. Associate Dean for 

Undergraduate Programs 
William E. Isler, Assistant Dean for 

Resea rch 
Robert M. Turner, Assistant Dean 

for Student Services 
Hubert Winston, Assistant Dean for 

Academ ic Affa i rs 

COLLEGE OF FOREST RESOURCES 

Larry W. Tombaugh. Dean 
J. Douglas Wellman, Associate Deanfor 
Academic Affairs 

COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES 
AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

William B. Toole, HI, Dean 

M. Mohan Sawhney, Associate Dean 

G. David Garson, Associate Deanfor 

Planning and Management 
Edith D. Sylla. Associate Dean 
for Research and Graduate Pro- 
grams 

COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND 
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Jerry L. Whitten. Dean 

Robert D. Bereman, Associate Dean 

for Academ ic Affairs 
Raymond E. Fornes, Associate Dean 

for Resea rch 

COLLEGE OF TEXTILES 

Robert A. Earnhardt, Dean 

David R. Buchanan, Associate Dean 

for Academic Affairs 
Solomon P. Hersh, Interim Associate 

Dea n 



COLLEGE OF VETERINARY 
MEDICINE 

Terrence M. Curtin, Dean 

Donald R. Howard, Associate Dean and 

Director of Research and Graduate 

Studies 
Charles E. Stevens, Associate Dean 

and Director of Research and 

Graduate Studies 
Richard B. Ford, Associate Dean 

and Director of Veterinary 

Medical Services 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Debra W. Stewart, Dean 

Donald A. Emery, Associate Dean 

Elizabeth M. Crawford, Associate 

Dean 
Thoyd Melton. Associate Dean 

DIVISION OF UNDERGRADUATE 
STUDIES 

Murray S. Downs, Interim Dean 
Academic Support Program for Student 
Athletes 
Roger A. E. Callanan, Interim 
Director 
The First Year Experience Program 
Rebecca Leonard, Interim Assistant 
Dean 
Undergraduate Studies Tutorial Center 

Ann F. Mann, Director 
Unirersity Cooperative Education 
Program 

William D. Weston, Director 
University Transition Program 

Frankye B. Artis, Director 
University Undesignated Program 
E. Hugh Fuller. Director 
RESEARCH OFFICE 

William L. Klarman, Interim Vice 

Chancellor for Research 
Leslie B. Sims, Associate Vice Chan- 
cellor for Research 
Jimmie R. Suttler, Assistant Vice 
Chancellor 

EXTENSION AND PUBLIC 
SERVICE 

Arthur L. White, Interim Vice 

Chancellor 
Sondra L. Kirsch, Interim Associate 
Vice Chancellor 
Center for Urban Affairs and 
Community Services 
Peter Meyer, Director 
Division for Lifelong Education 

Edgar B. Marston, Director 
Emerging Issues Forum 
Betty C. Owen, Director 



Instructional Telecommunications 
Thomas L. Russell, Director 

McKimmon Center 
Denis S. Jackson, Director 

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

Thomas H. Stafford, Jr., Vice 
Chancellor 

Ronald C. Butler, Associate Vice 
Chancellor 

Gerald G. Hawkins, Associate Vice 
Chancellor 

Charles A. Haywood, Associate Vice 
Chancellor 
Career Planning and Placement Center 

Walter B. Jones, Director 
Counseling Center 

M. Lee Salter, Director 
Craft Center 

Conrad W. Weiser, Director 
Financial Aid 

Carl 0. Eycke, Director 
Handicapped Student Services 

Pat D. Smith, Coordinator 
Health Services 

Jerry W. Barker, Director 
Housing and Residence Life 

Susan D. Grant, Interim Co-Director 

Mark S. Denke, Interim Co-Director 
International Student Office 

Donald R. Roberts, Director 
Merit Awards Program and Special 

Scholarships 

Patricia J. Lee, Coordinator 
Music Department 

Ronald J. Toering, Director 
Registration and Records 

James H. Bundy, Registrar 
Stewart Theatre 

Sharon Herr, Director 
Student Development 

Evelyn M. Reiman, Director 
Study Abroad 

Cynthia F. Chalou, Director 
Thompson Theatre 

John Mcllwee, Director 
University Dining 

Zeph Putman, Associate 
Director 
University Schola rs Programs 

Alex Miller, Coordinator 
University Student Center 

Lee R. McDonald, Director 
Upward Bound 

Cynthia J. Harris, Director 
Visual Arts Programs 

Charlotte V. Brown, Director 



FINANCE AND BUSINESS 

George L. Worsley, Vice Chancellor 

for Finance and Business 
Alice R. Miller, Associate Vice Chan- 
cellor for Human Resources 
Joyce B. Baffi, Assistant Vice 

Chancellor for Finance 
Charles D. Leffler, Assistant Vice 

Chancellor for Facilities 
Thurstx)n J. Mann, Assistant 

Vice Chancellor for Business 
Preston Bethea, Internal Audit 

Director 
Steve Keto, Director, Budgets 
and Administrative Systems 
Administrative Computing Service 

H. Leo Buckmaster, Director 
Benefit'^ 

Ronald G. EWis, Jr., Benefits Manager 
Campus Planning and Construction 
Edwin F. Harris, Jr., Director and 
University Architect 
Contracts and Grants 

Earl N. Pulliam, Director 
Payroll 

Lise Miller, Director 
Physical Plant 

Brian J. Chase, Director 
Public Safety 

Ralph Harper, Director and Chief 



Purchasing 

Robert Wood, Director 
Studeyit Accounts 

William R. Styons, Director 
NCSU Bookstores 

Richard Hayes, Director 
Telecom munications 

Miriam Tripp, Director 
Transportation 

Howard Harrell, Interim Director 

DEVELOPMENT 

John T. Kanipe, Jr., Vice 
Chancellor for University 
Development 

H. Ken DeDominicis, Associate 
Vice Chancellor 

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS 

Albert B. Lanier, Jr., Vice Chancellor 
Beth A. McGee, Associate Vice 

Chancellor 
Hardy D. Berry, Assistant Vice 
Chancellor, Communications 
Information Services 

Lucy C. Coulbourn, Director 
Broadcast Services 
Robert S. Cairns, Director 

ATHLETICS 

William T. Turner, Director 





Academic Calendar 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1991 



January 
January 

January 
January 



9 
16 

21 
24 



Weds. 
Weds. 

Mon. 
Thurs. 



February 7 Thurs. 



February 


20 


Weds. 


March 


1 


Fri. 


March 


11 


Mon. 


March 


15 


Fri. 


March 


18 


Mon. 


March 


23 


Sat. 


March 


29 


Fri. 


April 


26 


Fri. 


April 


29- 


Mon. 


May 


7 


Tues. 


May 


11 


Sat. 


SUMMER SE 


SSION 


First Session 




May 


21 


Tues. 


May 


22 


Weds. 



May 



May 



June 



27 



Mon. 



31 Fri. 



Fri. 



June 21 
June 24-25 


Fri. 
Mon.-Tues. 


Second Session 




July 1 
July 2 


Mon. 
Tues. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Holiday (Martin Luther King Day) 

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition 

and fees) or to add a course: last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund; last day for 

undergraduate students to drop below 12 hours. 

The tuition and fees charge is based on the official 

number of hours and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. 

on the day. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a grade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below. 

Academic Difficulty Reports due. 

Spring vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

Registration advising for 1991 fall semester 

begins 

TRAC registration opens 

Holiday (Good Friday) 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

Commencement 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition 

and fees) and to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund. The tuition and 

fees charge is based on the official number of hours 

and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a grade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below: last 

day to change to credit only 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 



11 



Julv 
July 



July 



July 

August 
Augrust 



4 Thurs. 
9 Tues. 



12 Fri. 



19 

2 
5-6 



Fri. 

Fri. 
Mon.-Tues. 



Holiday (Independence Day) 

Last day to register (includes payment or tuition 

and fees) and to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund. The tuition and 

fees charge is ba^ed on the official number of hours 

and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a grade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below; last 

day to change to credit only 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



FALL SEMESTER, 1991 



August 
August 



21 
28 



September 2 
September 5 



October 



25 



Weds. 
Weds. 

Mon. 
Thurs. 



September 19 Wed. 



October 


2 


Weds 


October 


4 


Fri. 


October 


11 


Fri. 


October 


16 


Weds 


October 


21 


Mon. 



Fri. 



October 26 Sat. 

November 26 Tues. 

December 2 Mon. 

December 6 Fri. 

December 9-17 Mon.-Tues. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Holiday (Labor Day) 

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition 

and fees) and to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund; last day for 

undergraduate students to drop below 12 hours. 

The tuition and fees charge is based on the official 

number of hours and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. 

on this day. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a grade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below; last 

day to change to credit only 

Honors convocation (no classes until 12:00 noon) 

Academic Difficulty Reports due 

Fall vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. 

Registration advising for 1992 spring semester 

begins 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

TRAC registration opens 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



SPRING SEMESTER, 1992 



January 8 

January 15 

January 20 



Weds. 
Weds. 

Mon. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without premission of 

instructor 

Holiday (Martin Luther King Day) 



12 



January 23 Thurs. 



February 



Thurs. 



February 


19 


Wed. 


February 


28 


Fri. 


March 


9 


Mon. 


March 


13 


Fri. 


March 


23 


Mon. 


March 


28 


Sat. 


April 


17 


Fri. 


April 


24 


Fri. 


April 


27- 


Mon.- 


May 


5 


Tues. 


May 


9 


Sat. 



Last day to register (includes payment of tuition 

and fees) and to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund; last day for 

undergraduate students to drop below 12 hours. 

The tuition and fees charge is based on the official 

number of hours and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. 

on this day. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a gade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below; last 

day to change to credit only 

Academic Difficulty Reports due 

Spring vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

Registration advising for 1992 fall semester 

begins 

TRAC registration opens 

Holiday (Good Friday) 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 

Commencement 



SUMMER SESSIONS, 1992 
First Session 



May 
May 

May 



May 



June 



19 
20 



Tues. 
Weds. 



25 Mon. 



29 Fri. 



Fri. 



June 19 
June 22-23 


Fri. 

Mon. -Tues, 


Second Session 




June 29 
June 30 


Mon. 
Tues. 


July 3 
July 6 


Fri. 
Mon. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition 

and fees) and to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund. The tuition and 

fees charge is based on the official number of hours 

and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day. 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a grade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below; last 

day to change to credit only 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Holiday (Independence Day) 

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition 

and fees) and to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund. The tuition and 

fees charge is based on the official number of hours 

and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. on this day. 



13 



Julv 



July 

July 
August 



10 Fri. 



17 Fri. 



31 
3-4 



Fri. 
Mon.-Tues. 



Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a grade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below; last 

day to change to credit only 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



FALL SEMESTER, 1992 



August 
August 



19 
26 



Weds. 
Weds. 



September 2 Weds. 



September 
September 


7 
17 


Mon. 
Thurs 


September 

October 

October 

October 

October 


30 

2 

9 

14 

19 


Weds. 

Fri. 

Fri. 

Weds. 

Mon. 


October 


23 


Fri. 


October 
November 
November 
December 


24 
24 
30 

4 


Sat. 
Tues. 
Mon. 
Fri. 



December 7-15 Mon.-Tues. 



First day of classes 

Last day to add a course without permission of 

instructor 

Last day to register (includes payment of tuition 

and fees) and to add a course; last day to withdraw 

or drop a course with a refund; last day for 

undergraduate students to drop below 12 hours. 

The tuition and fees charge is based on the official 

number of hours and courses carried at 5:00 p.m. 

on this day. 

Holiday (Labor Day) 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 400 

level or below without a grade; last day to change 

from credit to audit at the 400 level or below; last 

day to change to credit only 

Honors Convocation (no classes until 12:00 noon) 

Academic Difficulty Reports due 

Fall vacation begins at 1:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. 

Registration advising for 1993 spring semester 

begins 

Last day to withdraw or drop a course at the 500 

or 600 level 

TRAC registration opens 

Thanksgiving vacation begins at 10:00 p.m. 

Classes resume at 8:05 a.m. 

Last day of classes 

Final examinations 



Note: This calendar is subject to periodic review and revision. 



14 



Academic Fields of 
Study and Degrees 



North Carolina State University offers more than 89 fields of study at the 
undergraduate level. These fields of study include comprehensive academic 
programs leading to various baccalaureate degrees. Some are options withm 
degree programs, such as the Microbiology Option within the B.S. in Biological 
Sciences or the Writing-Editing Option within the B. A. in English. The Individ- 
ualized Study Program in Agriculture and Life Sciences and the Multi- 
disciplinary Studies Program in Humanities and Social Sciences each provide 
opportunities for creating additional fields of study to meet the specialized needs 
of particular students. 

The following are the undergraduate fields of study available at North Caro- 
lina State University: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 
Animal Science 
Food Science 
Horticultural Science 
Poultry Science 

Business 

Accounting 

Agricultural Business Management 

Business Management 

Biological Sciences 

Biochemistry 
Biological Sciences 
Botany 
Microbiology 
Zoology 

Design 

Architecture 
Environmental Design 
Landscape Architecture 
Product Design 
Visual Design 

Education (including teacher certifi- 
cation) 

Agricultural Education (grades 9-12) 
Education, General Studies 
English (grades 9-12) 
French Language and Literature 

(grades 9-12) 
Health Occupations Education 

(grades 9-12 or postsecondary) 



Marketing Education for Teachers 

(grades 9-12) 
Mathematics Education (grades 6-9 

or 9-12) 
Middle Grades Education (grades 6-9) 
Science Education (grades 6-9 or 9-12) 
Social Studies (grades 9-12) 
Spanish Language and Literature 

(grades 9-12) 
Technical Education (postsecondary) 
Technology Education 

(grades 9-12) 
Vocational Industrial Education 

(grades 9-12) 

Engineering 

Aerospace Engineering 
Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering 
Chemical Engineering 
Civil Engineering 
Computer Engineering 
Construction Engineering 
Construction Management 
Electrical Engineering 
Engineering 
Furniture Manufacturing and 

Management 
Industrial Engineering 
Materials Science and Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Nuclear Engineering 
Textile Engineering 



15 



Forestry and Natural Resources 

Conservation 

Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences 

Forestry 

Humanities 

Communication 

English 

French Language and Literature 

History 

Philosophy 

Spanish Language and Literature 

Writing-Editing 

Individualized Programs 

Individualized Study Program (Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences) 

Multidisciplinary Studies (Humani- 
ties and Social Sciences) 

Mathematics and Related Sciences 

Applied Mathematics 
Computer Science 
Mathematics 
Statistics 

Medical and Veterinary Sciences 

Medical Technology 
Pre-dental 
Pre-medical 
Pre-veterinary 



Physical Sciences 

Chemistry 
Geology 
Meteorology 
Physics 

Psychology 

Human Resource Development 
Psychology 

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism 

Recreation, Parks, and Tourism 
Management 

Social Sciences 

Agricultural Economics 
Applied Sociology 
Criminal Justice 
Economics 
Political Science 
Social Work 
Sociology 

Textiles 

Textile Chemistry 

Textile and Apparel Management 

Textile Science 

Textiles 

Wood Science 

Pulp and Paper Science and Tech- 
nology 
Wood Products 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAMS 

Pre-Law Program. Law schools neither prescribe nor recommend a particu- 
lar undergraduate curriculum for prospective candidates. A student may pre- 
pare for law school by a careful use of electives within any of the baccalaureate 
curricula offered by the eight colleges with undergraduate programs. The Col- 
lege of Humanities and Social Sciences has two faculty advisers designated to 
assist pre-law students with selection of appropriate electives and concentra- 
tions. They also advise the Pre-Law Student's Association, which is open to all 
interested students. This group invites outside speakers to make presentations 
about law schools and careers in the law. In addition, the group makes at least one 
and sometimes two visits per year to local law schools where the students can 
attend classes and visit with directors of admissions. For further information, 
consult Prof. D.L. Baumer, 10 Patterson Hall, 737-7156, or Prof. T.V. Reid, 202 
Caldwell Hall, 737-2481. 

Pre-Medieine, Pre-Dentistry, and Pre-Optometry Programs. Students 
preparing for medical, dental, or optometry schools major in areas such as the life 
sciences or physical sciences (frequently biology, chemistry, biochemistry, or 
zoology), the humanities or social sciences (frequently psychology), or engineer- 



16 



ing. Health science professional schools are more interested in the quality and 
scope of the applicants' education than in their academic major. 

The Department of Zoology offers a pre-medical/pre-dental curriculum lead- 
ing to a baccalaureate degree in zoology. The University Review Committee for 
Pre-professional Applicants in Health Sciences assists students in preparing 
applications and in providing evaluations to professional schools. For further 
information, consult Dr. W. C. Grant, Agriculture and Life Science, chairman of 
the Review Committee, or the pre-professional health science advisers in the 
several colleges: Prof. F. M. Richardson, Engineering; Dr. M. L. Miles, Physical 
and Mathematical Sciences; and Dr. J. W. Wilson, Humanities and Social 
Sciences. 

Pre- Veterinary Program. A pre-veterinary program of study is offered by 
the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences which may be taken by students 
majoring in animal science, poultry science, zoology, or biological sciences as well 
as in many other science curricula, such as biochemistry or chemistry. If a 
student is accepted to veterinary medical school before completion of his or her 
undergraduate degree, some course credits may be transferable from the veteri- 
nary program toward completion of the Bachelor of Science degree. Arrange- 
ments for this procedure should be made with the degree-granting school or 
department prior to entering veterinary college. For further information, con- 
sult the Director of Academic Affairs of the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. For general information concerning admission to the Doctor of Veteri- 
nary Medicine programs at NCSU, consult the College of Veterinary Medicine 
Admissions Office. 

UNDERGRADUATE MINORS 

The following undergraduate minors are available to all undergraduate 
degree students at North Carolina State University: 

Accounting, African-American Studies, Agricultural Business Management, 
Agricultural Economics, Animal Science, Anthropology, Applied Sociology, 
Arts Studies. Botany, Business Management, Chinese Studies, Classical Greek, 
Classical Studies, Cognitive Science, Comparative Literature, Computer Pro- 
gramming, Design, Economics, English, Environmental Science, Film Studies, 
Food Science, Forest Management, French, Genetics, Geology, German, Graphic 
Communications, History, Horticultural Science, Industrial Engineering, 
International Studies, Italian Studies, Japanese, Journalism, Linguistics, 
Materials Science and Engineering, Mathematics, Meteorology, Nutrition, 
Philosophy, Physical Education (Coaching Emphasis), Physics, Political 
Science, Psychology, Recreation Resources Administration, Religious Studies, 
Russian Studies, Science, Technology, and Society, Social Work, Sociology, Soil 
Science, Spanish, Statistics, Technology Education, Textile Chemistry, Theatre, 
Women's Studies, Wood Products, and Zoology. 



17 



AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

Admission to this two-year program requires high school graduation and a 
letter of recommendation. The program does not carry college credit. An Asso- 
ciate of Applied Science degree is awarded. Fields of study are: 

Agribusiness Management 
Agricultural Mechanization and Management 
Agricultural Pest Control 
Field Crops Technology 

Food Processing, Distribution, and Service j 

General Agriculture 

Livestock Management and Technology (Animal Husbandry and Dairy Hus- 
bandry Options) 1 
Ornamentals and Landscape Technology 
Turfgrass Management 

UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES AND DEGREE OPTIONS 

Bachelor of: 

School of Design 

architecture (fifth-year program); environmental design; en- 
vironmental design in architecture; environmental design in 
landscape architecture; environmental design in product 
design; and environmental design in visual design. 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 
social work. 

Bachelor of Science in: 

College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

(Business) agricultural business management 

(Science) agricultural economics; agricultural systems technology; 

animal science; applied sociology (including option in crimi- 
nal justice); biochemistry; biological sciences (including an 
option in microbiology); botany; conservation; fisheries and 
wildlife sciences; food science; horticultural science; medical 
technology; poultry science; pre-veterinary option; and zool- 
ogy (including options in pre-dental and pre-medical). 

(Technology) agronomy; animal science; biological and agricultural engi- 
neering; food science; horticultural science; and poultry sci- 
ence. 

(Individualized Study Program) in agriculture and life sciences. 



18 



College of Education and Psychology 

agricultural education: education, general studies; health 
occupations teacher education; marketing education for teachers; 
mathematics education; middle grades education; science 
education; technical education; technology education; and 
vocational industrial education. 

College of Engineering 

aerospace engineering; biological and agricultural engineer- 
ing; chemical engineering; civil engineering; civil engineer- 
ing, construction option; computer engineering; computer 
science; construction management; electrical engineering; 
engineering; furniture manufacturing and management; in- 
dustrial engineering; materials science and engineering; 
mechanical engineering; and nuclear engineering. 

College of Forest Resources 

conservation; forestry; parks, recreation, and tourism man- 
agement; pulp and paper science and technology; wood 
products. 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

economics; English; history; philosophy; and political science. 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 

chemistry; geology; mathematics; meteorology; physics; and 
statistics. 

College of Textiles 

textile chemistry; textile engineering; textile and apparel 
management; textile science; and textiles. 

Bachelor of Arts in: 

College of Education and Psychology 

psychology (including option in human resource develop- 
ment). 

College of Humanities and Social Sciences 

accounting: business management; communication; econom- 
ics: English (including options in teacher education and 
writing-editing): French (including an option in teacher edu- 
cation); history; multidisciplinary studies in humanities and 
social sciences: philosophy; political science (including an 
option in criminal justice): social studies education option (in 
history, political science, or sociology): sociology (including an 
option in criminal justice): and Spanish (including an option in 
teacher education). 

College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
chemistry; geology. 

19 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

College of Engineering 

Chemical Engineer; Civil Engineer; Electrical Engineer; 
Industrial Engineer; Materials Engineer; Mechanical Engi- 
neer; and Nuclear Engineer. 

College of Veterinary Medicine 

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine 

GRADUATE DEGREES 

Master of: 

agriculture; architecture; biological and agricultural engi- 
neering; biomathematics; chemical engineering; chemistry; 
civil engineering; computer engineering; computer science; 
economics; education; electrical engineering; engineering 
(off-campus program only); forestry; industrial engineering; 
integrated manufacturing systems engineering; landscape 
architecture; life sciences; materials science and engineering; 
mechanical engineering: nuclear engineering; product de- 
sign; public affairs; recreation resources administration; soci- 
ology; statistics; technology for international development; 
textiles; toxicology; wildlife biology; and wood and paper 
science. 

Master of Arts in: 

archival management; economics; English; history; liberal 
studies; and political science. 

Master of Science in: 

adult and community college education; aerospace engineer- 
ing; agricultural economics; agricultural education; animal 
science; applied mathematics; biochemistry; biological and 
agricultural engineering; biomathematics; botany; chemical 
engineering; chemistry; civil engineering; computer engi- 
neering; computer science; crop science; curriculum and 
instruction; ecology; educational administration and supervi- 
sion; electrical engineering; entomology; food science; fores- 
try; genetics; guidance and personnel services; horticultural 
science; industrial arts education; industrial engineering; 
management; marine, earth and atmospheric sciences; mate- 
rials science and engineering; mathematics; mathematics 
education; mechanical engineering; microbiology; middle 
grades education; nuclear engineering; nutrition; occupa- 
tional education; operations research; physics; physiology; 



20 



I 



! 



plant pathology; poultry science: psychology; recreation re- 
sources administration; rural sociology; science education; soil 
science; special education; statistics; technical communica- 
tion; textile chemistry; textiles; toxicology; veterinary medi- 
cal sciences; vocational industrial education; wildlife biology; 
wood and paper science; and zoology. 

Doctor of Philosophy in: 

aerospace engineering; animal science; applied mathematics; 
biochemistry; biological and agricultural engineering; bio- 
mathematics; botany; chemical engineering; chemistry; civil 
engineering; crop science; computer engineering; computer 
science; economics; electrical engineering; entomology; fiber 
and polymer science; food science; forestry; genetics; horticul- 
tural science; industrial engineering; marine, earth and 
atmospheric sciences; materials science and engineering; 
mathematics; mathematics education; mechanical engineer- 
ing; microbiology; nuclear engineering; nutrition; operations 
research; physics; physiology; plant pathology; psychology; 
science education; sociology; soil science; statistics; toxicology; 
veterinary medical sciences; wood and paper science; and 
zoology. 

Doctor of Education in: 

adult and community college education; curriculum and 
instruction; educational administration and supervision; guid- 
ance and personnel services; industrial arts education; and 
occupational education. 

Consult the Graduate Catalog for further information on graduate programs 
and admissions procedures. 

Natural Resources Curricula 

The area of "natural resources" covers broad, technically complex and interre- 
lated systems of physical, biological, economic, and political areas. Rising 
demand for use of all natural resources, from recreational opportunities to min- 
erals, from mountain forests to the ocean depths, creates difficult environmental, 
economic, and ethical questions. Recognizing that no one curriculum can cover 
all aspects of natural resources, curricula have been designed to provide a broad 
based education dealing with specific aspects of natural resources. 



21 



At the present time, the following curricula address issues related to natural 
resources: 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
Agricultural and Resource Economics 
Agronomy 

Soil Science Concentration 
Botany 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 
Biological Sciences 
Conservation 
Environmental Technology Concentration 

Natural Resource Management and Administration Concentration 
Soil Conservation Concentration 
Fisheries and Wildlife 
Horticulture (Landscape Horticulture) 
Zoology 
School of Design 

Environmental Design in Landscape Architecture 
College of Engineering 

Civil Engineering 
College of Forest Resources 
Conservation 
Administration and Management Concentration 
Natural Resources Concentration 
Soil Concentration 
Forestry 
Management Concentration 
College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences 
Chemistry 
Geology 
Meteorology 



Arts Studies 



North Carolina State University offers a rich variety of courses in the history, 
analysis and production of the arts — dance, film, music, theatre, visual arts. 
Many of these courses are open to students without prerequisite. Because they are 
offered by thirteen departments in four different colleges of the university, they 
are listed together below. They are described in detail in the "Course Descrip- 
tion" section of the catalog under the indicated course prefix. 

In addition to these courses, most of which focus on a single art form, the 
Division of Multidisciplinary Studies offers special topics courses (MDS 295, 495) 
each of which deals with several arts media or with the arts in connection with 
science and technology; information about these courses, which change each 
year, is available from the Office of Multidisciplinary Studies in Harrelson Hall. 

For students who want to concentrate in Arts Studies, an academic minor is 
available. In addition, there are minors in Theatre, Design, and Film Studies. 

22 



Students may also major in Multidisciplinary Studies with a concentration on 
Arts Studies. This program makes it possible for students to prepare themselves, 
for example, for graduate programs in art conservation or medical illustration. 
Opportunities for students to participate in arts activities include many 
instrumental and choral organizations, student productions in Thompson The- 
atre, craft instruction and facilities in the Craft Center, and the exhibitions of the 
Visual Arts Program. These activities, many of which are integrated with aca- 
demic courses, are described in more detail under "Student Activities" later in 
this section of the catalog. 

NOTE: Courses that involve substantial "hands on" activities are indicated 
by italics. 

Aesthetics: DN 445, ENG 496. PHI 306 

Art and 
Design ARC 441; DF 111, 112; DN 141, 142, 212, 221, 222, 231, 311, 312, 
35i, Ull, UlU, U5U; LAR 23A, 443, 444; TED 230, 2U6, 351; 
VD242 

Dance: PE 263, 26U, 272, 273, 27h, 275 

Film: COM 2U, 364, 374; DN 316; ENG 282, 482 

History of 

Art: HA 201, 202, 203, 305, 401, 402, 404 

Music: MUS 100, 101, 102, 110, 120, 150, 200. 210, 215, 220, 230, 240, 250, 

300, 301, 302, 305, 320, 350 
Several 

Arts: CL 495; ECI 415; FLF 315, 352; FLS 315, 316; MDS 327; RRA 365 

Theatre: COM 103, 203, 213, 223, 233, 303, 323 

Writing: ENG 288, 289, A88, A89, 588, 589 



Honors and Scholars Programs 

UNIVERSITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The University Scholars Programs are designed to address the needs of stu- 
dents who are academically successful, highly motivated, and committed to 
excellence and intellectual exploration. Coordinated between the Division of 
Student Affairs, the University Undesignated Program, the School of Design 
and the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Education and Psychology. 
Engineering, Forest Resources, Humanities and Social Sciences, Physical and 
Mathematical Sciences, and Textiles, the University Scholars Programs provide 
a variety of unique educational experiences for qualified undergraduates. Stu- 
dents are invited to participate on the basis of selection criteria specific to each 
school or college. 

Participants in the University Scholars Programs have the opportunity to 
enroll in sections of academic courses reserved for Scholars. These courses, which 
are taught by distinguished faculty members, encourage the development of a 
learning environment that is richly invigorating and intellectually stimulating. 



23 



Scholars also attend a weekly Forum Series which includes guest speaker pre- 
sentations and discussions on issues of contemporary social and educational 
significance. Through the University Scholars Programs, NCSU Scholars are 
members and participate in the activities of the North Carolina Honors Associa- 
tion, the Southern Regional Honors Council and the National Collegiate Honors 
Council. Extracurricular opportunities and educational field trips are also made 
available to broaden the personal and cultural horizons of participants. In addi- 
tion to these activities, there are specific academic expectations defined by the 
respective schools or colleges. 

For more information contact the Coordinator of University Scholars Pro- 
grams (102 Sullivan, 737-2353) or the office of the appropriate college dean. 

HONORS PROGRAMS 

Honors programs are offered by the academic colleges. Students who complete 
an honors program are designated with a prefix "H" on the commencement 
program and their permanent records indicate honors classes. Honors partici- 
pants benefit from a more individualized and rigorous approach to their desired 
degree through special classes, seminars, and individual research. 

The Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Humanities and Social Scien- 
ces, Forest Resources, Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and Textiles have 
college-wide honors programs. Information is available from the office of the 
dean of each of these colleges. The Psychology Department has an honors 
program. 

Students who have achieved an average of 3.0 (B) or better in their first 
semester, first year, or first two years may be eligible for honors programs, but 
some programs require higher averages. Students who feel they are eligible 
should take the initiative to learn about honors program opportunities by contact- 
ing the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of their college. 



Scholarships 



UNIVERSITY MERIT AWARDS PROGRAM FOR 
ENTERING FRESHMEN 

N. C. State University offers a competitive scholarship program for entering 
freshmen to recognize and to encourage exceptional academic ability and 
achievement. Graduating seniors of good character and leadership potential who 
have excelled in their high school academic and extracurricular endeavors may 
apply for a large number of merit award opportunities at the university. Finan- 
cial need is not a consideration in the selection of recipients for these awards. 

Each year the Merit Awards Program conducts a nation-wide competition for 
approximately 80 university-wide scholarships (available to students entering 
any academic major) as well as over 125 other scholarships that are offered 
through individual colleges and departments. Completion of the Merit Awards 
Program application packet, which consists of the student's application as well as 

24 



other supporting documents, assures that a student will be considered for all 
available freshman merit awards. The application packet is available by August 
preceding the student's senior year in high school, and the application deadline is 
mid-November of the senior year. 

Semifinalists are identified from the entire applicant pool in mid-January and 
are invited to North Carolina State University in February for personal inter- 
views. An interview for finalists is conducted in March, after which award 
recipients are announced in early April. 

The John T. Caldwell Alumni Scholarship, which is sponsored by the NCSU 
Alumni Association, is the university's most prestigious award for entering 
freshmen. At least 30 Caldwell Scholarships valued at $3500/year (up to $14,000 
for four years) for in-state recipients and $6000/year (up to $24,000 for four years) 
for out-of-state recipients are offered each year. This excellent scholarship seeks 
students who demonstrate both academic excellence and strong leadership 
potential. 

Yearly renewal of the Caldwell and the other university-wide renewable 
awards assumes the maintenance of a 3.0 grade point average once a recipient is 
engaged in full-time coursework at the University. 

Many other scholarships ranging from $1000 for the freshman year up to the 
Caldwells are available in each year's competition. 

Students who rank near the top of their class and who have strong SAT scores 
(in the range of 1200 or above) should request their Merit Awards application 
packet from: 

Merit Awards Program 
North Carolina State University 
2118 Pullen Hall, Box 7342 
Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7342 

Phone inquiries are welcome: (919) 737-3671. 

UNIVERSITY FACULTY SCHOLARSHIPS 
FOR JUNIORS AND SENIORS 

Rising juniors and seniors who have outstanding records of scholarly achieve- 
ment, whose college careers have been spent at NCSU (exclusive of summer 
school and exchange programs), and who have not been awarded a concurrent 
academic scholarship of over $2,000 a year are eligible to apply for one-year, 
renewable University Faculty Scholarships. Up to four University Faculty Schol- 
arships, each for- $4,000 are awarded annually. The Executive Council of the 
Academy of Outstanding Teachers will constitute the selection committee. 
Applications for University Faculty Scholarships to be awarded for the 1991-92 
academic year must be submitted to Dr. Gerald G. Hawkins, Associate Vice 
Chancellor, Student Affairs, Box 7316, NCSU Campus (737-3151). 

COLLEGE AND DEPARTMENTAL SCHOLARSHIPS 
FOR CONTINUING STUDENTS 

A number of scholarships based upon academic achievement are administered 
directly through some of the academic departments for students engaged in 



25 



full-time coursework at the university. See the Colleges, Departments, and Pro- 
grams of Study section later in the catalog. A continuing student should contact 
the college/department of his or her academic major for information about 
specific scholarship opportunities that do not require the filing of financial 
information. 



Special Academic Programs 

UNIVERSITY UNDESIGNATED PROGRAM 

The University Undesignated Program, 528 Poe Hall (737-3593), helps 
selected freshmen explore the University's diverse programs of study for up to 36 
credit hours before declaring their academic majors. The staff is responsible for 
academic advising and other activities designed to help enrolled students make 
rational and informed decisions in the selection of the major fields. Currently, 
approximately 200 new freshmen with a minimum expected first-year perfor- 
mance of about 2.40 are admitted each year. University Undesignated freshmen 
are required to enroll in a year-long orientation course specifically designed to 
provide a formal vehicle for the exploration of the many fields of study at the 
University as well as in a specially selected enrichment course. 

UNIVERSITY TRANSITION PROGRAM 

The University Transition Program, 102/104 Reynolds Coliseum (737-7053), 
serves to help selected new freshmen get a good start at NCSU. Approximately 
65 freshmen are admitted to the University through this program. Participants 
in the program are required to attend the second Summer Session, taking care- 
fully selected courses as a part of their freshman year. Additionally, as part of 
their first-year experience. University Transition students are enrolled in a 
one-hour course focusing on personal development, study skills, and other areas 
crucial to college success. Individual advising on course selection, personal coun- 
seling, and tutorial assistance are provided throughout the year. 

University Transition students may begin to select their major field of study 
during the second semester of their freshman year. Participants must transfer 
into a degree program no later than their fifth semester at NCSU. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Cooperative Education Program is designed to be an integral part of a 
student's educational program and is offered in all colleges. The co-op program 
enriches and expands classroom learning by providing sponsored work assign- 
ments in industry, business and government. Work experience is selected based 
on its relevance to a student's major and/or career goals and provides for alternat- 
ing semesters of study and full-time work. This alternating plan is available in all 
colleges. A parallel plan (part-time study and part-time work) is also available as 
an option in several colleges. 



26 



The co-op experience normally takes place during the sophomore and junior 
years and means that attaining a degree will take more than eight semesters. A 
grade point average of 2.25 is required for students entering this program. 
Freshmen are not eligible, and transfers must first complete at least one semes- 
ter at NCSU. Engineering students must have been admitted to a degree pro- 
gram. To remain in the program, students must maintain a cumulative average 
of 2.00, agree to participate for a minimum of 12 months of full-time work 
experience or its equivalent, and be registered for each work period. 

EVENING UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers complete undergraduate 
degree programs during the evening hours for adult part-time students. Such 
degree programs are available in the division of Economics and Business; the 
departments of Communication; English; History; Sociology, Anthropology, and 
Social Work; Foreign Languages and Literatures; and Political Science; as well 
as in Multidisciplinary Studies. Persons interested in more information about 
these evening degree programs should contact the Coordinator of Evening Pro- 
grams, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Box 8101, N.C.S.U., Raleigh, 
N. C. 27695-8101: (919) 737-3638. 

NON-DEGREE CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Non-degree certificate programs are prescribed sets of regular academic 
courses which offer limited but structured continuing education opportunities. 
They are designed expressly for Lifelong Education Students, and students 
enrolled in undergraduate or graduate degree programs at NCSU are not eligi- 
ble to participate simultaneously in these certificate programs. Satisfactory 
completion of the prescribed courses is recognized by the issuing of a certificate 
from the department or college that offers that program. 

Certificate programs are currently offered by the following academic units: 
Department of Adult and Community College Education— Studies in Gerontol- 
ogy; Department of Communication— Human Communication, with track 
options in Public Communication, Interpersonal Communication, Organiza- 
tional Communication and Theater Communication; Department of Computer 
Science— Computer Programming (PBS students only); Department of 
English— Professional Writing; Department of Occupational Education- 
Trainer Development; Department of Political Science and Public Adminis- 
tration—Management Development (PBS students only) with program areas 
such as Adult and Community College Administration, Data Management, 
Financial Management, Human Resources Management, Management Control 
Systems, and Public Affairs; and the College of Textiles— Textiles with subject 
areas including Apparel Production, Dyeing and Finishing, Fabric Production, 
Textile Fibers and Polymers, Fiber Science for Textile Conservators, Textile 
Administration, Textile Fundamentals, and Yarn Manufacturing. 

For information concerning enrollment requirements and prescribed courses 
for a particular certificate program, consult the department or college offering 
that program or the Division for Lifelong Education (737-2265). 



27 



THE FIRST YEAR EXPERIENCE 

The First Year Experience is designed to help freshmen make a successful 
transition to the college environment. Freshmen in the program live together in 
designated residence halls. 

First Year Experience students take a one-credit hour seminar each semester 
where academic and transitional issues are discussed. The seminar is taught by 
excellent faculty and professional staff who have special interest in the education 
of first year students. 

Students who participate in the program can enroll in certain classes combined 
in thematic clusters. Registration in these cluster classes is reserved for fresh- 
men in the program, and some of the courses are taught in Residence Hall 
classrooms. 

Each student in the program also has an upperclass student mentor and an 
adult mentor (a faculty or staff member) available to assist them in making a 
successful transition to NCSU. 

Participation in The First Year Experience is selective and based on potential 
contributions to the program. Students are expected to be active participants in 
The First Year Experience. Students interested in applying or wishing addi- 
tional information should contact the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies 
or call 737-7528. 

UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES TUTORIAL CENTER 

The Undergraduate Studies Tutorial Center, 528A Poe Hall (737-3163) is open 
to any student at NCSU taking 100- or 200-level courses in English, foreign 
languages, math, and science. It provides one-to-one and small group tutorial in 
many entry-level courses. Tutoring sessions focus on study skills and learning 
techniques as well as course content. Tutors are carefully selected for their ability 
to communicate and their expertise in their subject areas. Students agree to meet 
with tutors on a regular basis once or twice a week and are encouraged to begin 
their participation in tutorials early in the semester and continue throughout the 
semester to assure their chances for academic success at NCSU. The program 
encourages communication between instructors and tutors. 

Supplemental Instruction 

The Undergraduate Studies Tutorial Center also offers Supplemental Instruc- 
tion (SI) for selected sections of chemistry, mathematics, and physics. Students in 
SI sections of these courses can meet with an SI leader for three hours of review 
each week. 

THE PEER MENTOR PROGRAM 

The Peer Mentor Program is a student peer-helper program through which 
academ ically talented upperclass African- American students serve as "mentors" 
to entering African-American students. This program stresses the mentoring 
process as a prime motivating in the recruitment, retention, and graduation of 
minority students from this university. It assists the freshmen in making a 

28 



successful transition to campus life by providing them with a supportive contact 
person who acts as a sounding board for personal adjustment problems; inter- 
prets university policies; makes proper referrals; and generally, provides them 
with strategies for academic, emotional, and social success at NCSU. 

All incoming African-American freshmen are assigned a peer mentor prior to 
their arrival on campus. These freshmen are paired with upperclass students 
who are in the same major whenever possible. Because the peer mentors are 
trained in "helping skills" and possess a working knowledge of the campus 
environment, they play a significant role in influencing students' perceptions of 
themselves and of the potential benefits and rewards which can be gained from 
the post-secondary learning experience. 

COOPERATING RALEIGH COLLEGES 

The Cooperating Raleigh Colleges (CRC) is a voluntary organization com- 
prised of North Carolina State University, Meredith College, Peace College, St. 
Augustine's College, St. Mary's College, and Shaw University for the purpose of 
developing and conducting cooperative educational activities. The organization 
provides the opportunity for students to enroll at another institution for a course 
or courses not offered on their home campus. Other activities include a coopera- 
tive library arrangement, joint student activities, and faculty cooperation and 
interchange. 

Any NCSU undergraduate degree student who is enrolled in at least eight 
credit hours on the NCSU campus may take a course at another Raleigh college 
during a fall or spring semester (except that men may not enroll in courses at 
Peace College) provided that (a) the course is not taught on the NCSU campus and 
(b) the adviser and dean consider the course educationally desirable. 

Students may not register for more than a total of two courses in any semester 
at other CRC colleges. Under extenuating circumstances, exceptions for an 
additional course registration may be approved by the requesting student's 
school dean. 

Home campus students have first priority in class assignment. Courses taken 
at other institutions may be used as free electives and as alternatives to restricted 
electives, if so approved by adviser and dean. Credits earned in this manner may 
apply toward fulfilling graduation requirements, but grades from other CRC 
institutions are not used in computing a student's NCSU grade point average. 
Under this agreement, regular tuition and fees are paid to NCSU. Certain special 
fees may be required for special courses at other colleges, and the student is 
responsible for paying such fees. During the summer, there is no interinstitu- 
tional program with local colleges. A student desiring to take a summer course 
must register directly with the institution offering the course. 

NOTE: Lifelong Edux^ation students may not register for courses through inter- 
institutional procedure. 

NATIONAL STUDENT EXCHANGE PROGRAM 

North Carolina State is one of 70 colleges and universities in the United States 
belonging to the National Student Exchange Program. Each year an opportunity 

29 



is provided for NCSU students to study at one of the other participating schools 
and still pay the same tuition and fees they pay here, thus avoidingthe red tape 
normally associated with a change of school. Students returning from exchange 
reflect an increased feeling of independence, self-reliance and self-confidence, 
and a better appreciation of home region, family and home campus. A major 
impact of the exchange year has been an increased awareness and appreciation 
for the vast differences in ideas and values found in different geographic loca- 
tions. Eligible students must be an undergraduate with a 2.5 grade point average 
or better and be selected by a screening committee. Preference is given to North 
Carolina residents. For further information contact the National Student 
Exchange Office in 2120 Pullen Hall. 

NORTH CAROLINA STATE FELLOWS PROGRAM 

North Carolina State University offers a special learning and self-development 
experience known as the North Carolina State Fellows Program. The program is 
designed to assist outstanding, talented students to develop their leadership 
potential at an accelerated pace, and to accomplish this in ways not usually 
afforded by the university. Each year approximately 30 new freshmen are 
selected to participate in the program as Fellows. The program seeks to identify 
students of exceptional ability and motivation and to encourage their develop- 
ment as potential leaders for business, governmental, educational and other 
professional communities. The program attempts to fulfill its goal by providing 
training and developmental opportunities. 



International Programs 
and Activities 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 

About 1,100 students from approximately 90 countries attend the university 
and enrich the campus and community. The International Student Office assists 
these students with immigration and passport matters, currency permits, and 
medical, personal, and social concerns. 

International applicants are carefully screened for evidence of English lan- 
guage proficiency, adequate finances, and academic credentials indicating 
excellent potential for success. The minimum TOEFL requirement for admission 
voiisideration to North Carolina State University is 550 with scores of at least 50 
on two sections and no score lower than 45. The Lifelong Education Student 
category is not available to persons on temporary visas. The university has 
authority to issue Forms 1-20 for F-1 visas and Forms I AP-66 for J-I visas to fully 
qualified individuals. 

An orientation program for new international students students is conducted 
during the week preceeding the fall and spring semesters. 



30 



p 



International students are required to purchase the university student in- 
surance policy or provide proof of agency sponsor coverage. Special courses in 
English for Foreign Students (FLE) are required for those whose scores on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) are sufficiently high for admis- 
sion but who need further instruction to perform well academically. 

The International Student Committee of the University Student Center spon- 
sors a variety of social and cultural programs for international and American 
students. 

SUMMER INSTITUTE IN ENGLISH FOR SPEAKERS 
OF OTHER LANGUAGES 

The Summer Institute in English for Speakers of Other Languages is a five- 
week, intensive English language program for students from other countries 
who intend to pursue university studies or specialized training programs in the 
United States in the fall. The institute, which is jointly sponsored by the Depart- 
ment of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the Division for Lifelong Educa- 
tion, is held from early July to early August each summer. It is designed to 
provide students with intensive instruction and practice in the use of the English 
language. Emphasis is on developing fluency in speaking and understanding oral 
English as well as reading and writing skills. 

The institute also offers orientation to American life and institutions to give 
students insight into life in the U.S. and to help them to adjust to the new 
environment. There are films, lectures by guest speakers, and field trips on 
weekends to places of historic, cultural and scenic interest. 

Prospective students should have studied English and acquired some facility in 
the use of the spoken language prior to enrolling in the institute since its curricu- 
lum is not designed for beginners. 

Admission to the institute does not imply admission as a degree candidate at 
North Carolina State University or any other campus of the University of North 
Carolina System. 

The TOEFL Test (Test of English as a Foreign Language) is administered to 
students who wish to take it on the last day of the program. Since this is an 
institutional administration of the test, scores may not be sent to other institu- 
tions but are accepted by the Admissions Office and Graduate School at NCSU. 

ALEXANDER INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM 

The Alexander International program is a residence hall community for both 
American and international students. The 174 resident members of the program 
share the common goal of developing their understanding of different cultures 
and countries and developing cross-cultural relationships. The 87 American 
students and the equal number of international students, representing approxi- 
mately 40 foreign countries, become more sensitive to the values of different 
peoples, systems of government, economic structures, and religions. These goals 
are achieved through informal interactions, social and educational program- 
ming, and American and international roommate pairing. 



31 



Program activities in past years have included both an international dinner 
and international coffeehouse series, emphasizing customs, foods, and enter- 
tainment from various cultures. Workshops on cultural differences, cross- 
cultural communication and relationships, international employment opportuni- 
ties, and overseas studies are regularly included in the annual calendar of 
programs and activities. These activities provide an opportunity for American 
students to add an international dimension to their education while attending 
NCSU. 

Participation in this international program is selective and based upon poten- 
tial contributions to the program. Students are expected to be active partici- 
pants, to initiate programming, and to be supportive of the program goals. 
Students interested in applying or additional information should inquire at 105 
Alexander International Hall (737-2925). 

STUDY, TRAVEL, AND SHORT-TERM EMPLOYMENT ABROAD 

The Study Abroad Office assists students interested in overseas study and 
travel, short-term employment in foreign countries, and national and interna- 
tional scholarship competitions for study abroad. The staff provides personal and 
group advising, sponsors program presentations and information sessions, con- 
ducts orientation programs, and maintains a resource library. 

Many students participate in study abroad programs sponsored by NCSU, 
other U.S. colleges and universities, U.S. educational institutions, and foreign 
universities. The Study Abroad Office maintains descriptive literature and 
directories for over 1,000 individual programs. The staff advisors will assist 
students in selecting and evaluating various programs, assist in the procedure for 
approval of academic credit transfer, and suggest basic orientation readings and 
activities. The resource library materials include information on grant sources 
and competitions. These include annual competitions such as Fulbright Grants 
for graduate study, Marshall Scholarships for graduate study in the United 
Kingdom, Rhodes Scholarships for Oxford University, England, and many pro- 
grams which award specific country or specific academic curriculum grants for 
foreign study. 

Short-term employment and internship positions in a foreign country are also 
available. A program sponsored by the Council on International Educational 
Exchange assists students interested in summer or short-term (3-6 months) 
employment in Great Britain, France, Ireland, West Germany, New Zealand, 
Jamaica, and Costa Rica. InterExchange coordinates similar programs in 
Australia. Austria, Finland, France, Norway, Switzerland, West Germany and 
Yugoslavia. Both of these programs provide for employment visas and assistance 
in obtaining short-term employment. 

For students interested in summer and vacation period travel, the Study 
Abroad Office can provide assistance in planning a trip. Information is available 
concerning passport and visa applications, low cost accommodations, group 
travel programs, Eurail and other public transportation discount programs. 
International Student Identity Cards, overseas travel arrangements, and back- 
ground information on specific countries. 



32 



I 



Students interested in discussing study, travel, and short-term employment in 
other countries should contact the Study Abroad Office located at 2118 Student 
Services Center (737-2087). 

International Student Exchange Program. North Carolina State Univer- 
sity is one of 100 colleges and universities in the United States participating in the 
International Student Exchange Program. Through ISEP, undergraduate stu- 
dents may attend any of 100 member institutions in Africa, Asia, Australia, 
Canada, Europe, and Latin America on an exchange student basis for a summer 
semester or single academic year. 

North Carolina State students pay a program fee for their stay abroad which is 
based on their regular tuition and fees plus the cost of room and board at North 
Carolina State. Aside from travel expenses and health coverage, ISEP makes it 
possible for NCSU students to study outside the country for the same cost of 
continuing studies at NCSU. This arrangement also allows students to maintain 
their eligibility for financial aid. While abroad, ISEP students are entitled to all 
the benefits and services of regular full-time students at their host institutions. 
Room and board are provided and an ISEP coordinator on each campus is 
available to students for assistance with any problem. 

To apply to participate in ISEP at NCSU a student should have a cumulative 
grade point average of at least 2.5 and have already studied at NCSU for two 
semesters. Applicants must be proficient in the language of instruction at the 
study sites they choose. A campus selection committee, made up of faculty 
members, chooses those applicants as North Carolina State's participants. 
Applicants are not in competition with each other. The ISEP Selection Commit- 
tee bases its decision on the feasibility of each applicant's proposed course of 
study, on academic background, application and references. The selection pro- 
cess for each academic year takes place in the winter of the preceding year. 
Students begin the application process by requesting a copy of the ISEP Direc- 
tory from the Study Abroad Office. 

Semester in Santander, Spain. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte 
and North Carolina State University, in cooperation with the University of 
Cantabria, offer a Fall Semester Abroad program in Spain. Undergraduates 
from both North Carolina institutions, as well as qualified students from other 
institutions, spend a semester in the coastal city of Santander, taking classes in 
Spanish language, literature, art, geography and history. Students entering the 
program are expected to have completed four semesters of college Spanish or the 
equivalent with a grade of C or better. Overall academic average should be at 
least 2.5. Students may enroll for 12 to 15 credit hours. A member of the NCSU 
faculty of Foreign Languages and Literatures serves as resident director of the 
program. Further information may be obtained from the Study Abroad Office. 

Summer Study at Oxford, England. This program offers North Carolina 
State University students a four-week summer experience at Oxford, England. 
The program is limited to 30 participants and students may take one or two 
courses. Academic transfer credit is granted for this work by NCSU. Courses 
usually include Shakespeare, British History, and History of Art. All courses are 
taught by British scholars. Ample time is made available for independent travel 
in order to maximize the British experience. Contact the Study Abroad Office. 



33 



Summer Study in London, England. The College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences and the Division of Student Affairs offer a four-week summer study 
program in London. Students live at Canterbury Hall, University of London, and 
take one or two credit courses in British literature or the arts offered by NCSU 
faculty. The courses are illustrated by group visits to various literary and histori- 
cal sites in the London area as well as all-day tours outside of London. Evening 
sessions include plays, concerts, and lectures by British authorities. Weekends 
are free for independent travel. For specific details contact the Study Abroad 
Office. 

Summer Study in Germany. In cooperation with the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte, NCSU offers a month-long program which includes inten- 
sive instruction in the German language (intermediate level) and lectures on 
German culture and civilization. Instruction is by the Program Director (from 
UNC-C) and German instructors. The program is open to students with two prior 
semesters of university level German or equivalent. Contact the Study Abroad 
Office for further information. 

Summer Study in Mexico. The Department of Foreign Languages and Liter- 
atures sponsors a five-week Summer Study Program in Mexico, through which 
students can gain up to six academic credits. The program for both beginning 
and advanced students is designed to foster oral command of the language and to 
provide enrichment through first-hand knowledge of Mexican civilization and 
culture. In Mexico students visit places of interest, attend daily classes and have 
the opportunity to live with a Mexican family. A member of the NCSU faculty of 
Foreign Languages and Literatures serves as resident director and advisor, 
coordinating both academic work and extracurricular activities. Further infor- 
mation may be obtained from the Study Abroad Office. 

Summer Study in Togo, West Africa. Started in 1989, this program is the 
first NCSU program in the continent of Africa. Students have the opportunity to 
study in Lome, the capital of Togo, and learn about West African culture. Courses 
offered are Elementary, Intermediate French and African-American studies. 
Additional day trips are planned. For details, contact the Study Abroad Office. 

In addition to the study abroad programs described above, NCSU sponsors 
year-long exchanges in England, France, Japan, Netherlands, Costa Rica, Aus- 
tralia and Scotland. Details on these programs are available from the Study 
Abroad Office. 



Admissions 

The freshman application deadline for the fall semester and summer sessions is 
February 1 ; the transfer student deadline is April 1. Freshmen are encouraged to 
apply during the fall of the senior year in high school, as students will be accepted 
until the classes have been filled. Applicants for the School of Design should 
subm it applications by January 1 . Applications for the spring semester should be 
submitted prior to November L 



34 



Each applicant must complete an application form which may be obtained 
from high school counselors or by writing to: 

Director of Admissions 

Box 7103 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7103 

A nonrefundable $35 fee must accompany the completed application. 

FRESHMAN ADMISSION 

Admission to the university is competitive and, as those programs in high 
demand are more competitive, it is possible to be admissible to some programs 
but not to all programs at N.C. State. Applicants are asked to indicate their first, 
second and third choices for a curriculum, including undeclared majors within a 
college, or to indicate their choice of participating in the University Undesig- 
nated Freshman Program. Applications which are not admissible in the first 
curriculum choice will be reviewed for admissibility in the alternate curriculum 
choices. 

The admissions decision is based on the completion of the minimum entrance 
requirements set forth below and on the evaluation of the high school record, 
including the level and difficulty of the courses taken, the overall grade point 
average, rank in class and scores on the Scholastic Aptitude Test. These factors 
are reviewed with the curriculum choice to determine the likelihood of success as 
a freshman at N.C. State. 

The Board of Governors of The University of North Carolina System has 
determined that the minimum undergraduate admissions requirements for all 
constituent institutions, including North Carolina State University, shall be: 
— A high school diploma or its equivalent 

— English - four (4) course units in English, emphasizing grammar, composi- 
tion, and literature 
— Mathematics — three (3) course units in mathematics, including algebra I, 
algebra II, and geometry, or a higher level mathematics course for which 
algebra II is a prerequisite 
—Social Studies - two (2) course units in social studies, including one (1) unit in 

U.S. history 
— Science - three (3) course units in science, including at least one (1) unit in a 
life or biological science; at least one (1) unit in a physical science (for 
example, physical science, chemistry, physics), and at least one (1) laboratory 
course. 
—In addition, it is recommended that prospective students complete at least 
two (2) course units in one foreign language, and take one (1) foreign lan- 
guage course unit and one (1) mathematics course unit in the twelfth grade. 
Any additional entrance requirements for admission to North Carolina State 
University will be set forth in the Freshman Admissions Bulletin for that year. 

Applicants are accepted on either junior or senior test scores, although senior 
scores are recommended, especially if the applicant is also applying for financial 



35 



aid. An interview is not required and does not weigh in the admissions decision; a 
prospective student is always welcome to visit the Admissions Office, 112 Peele 
Hall. The Admissions Office conducts group information sessions every Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday at 10:30 a.m. and on Tuesday and Thursday at 1:30 p.m. 
Campus tours led by students are conducted each weekday, weather permitting, 
at 12:00 noon, starting at the Memorial Bell Tower. 

Two- Year Agricultural Institute 

Requirements for admission to the Agricultural Institute, a two-year terminal 
program, include graduation from an accredited high school or successful com- 
pletion of the high school equivalency examination administered by the State 
Department of Public Instruction. The application should include either a copy of 
the high school record or a letter indicating the applicant has passed the equival- 
ency examination and a letter of recommendation. Each application is reviewed 
and evaluated by the Institute Director. SAT scores are not required but are 
recommended. Course work is not transferable into the four-year degree 
programs. 

Scholastic Aptitude Test 

Applicants for admission as freshmen must take the College Board Scholastic 
Aptitude Test (SAT) and request that their scores be sent directly from the Board 
to North Carolina State University (Code No.— R5496). Information booklets and 
application forms may be obtained from school counselors or by writing: 

The College Board ATP 

Box 592 

Princeton, New Jersey 08541 

Achievement Tests 

Freshman students should take the Mathematics Achievement Test adminis- 
tered by Educational Testing Service to ensure proper math placement at 
NCSU. Students in curricula for which the normal /irsf mathematics course is 
calculus should take the Level II test. Students in all other curricula should take 
the Level I test. Current admissions information and the application contain 
information about appropriate achievement tests for each curriculum. 

Students who have not taken the Mathematics Achievement Test will be placed 
in a pre-calculus course. 

The English Achievement Test is not required but students who have taken it 
will receive more accurate placement in beginning English classes. 

Advanced Placement 

A student may qualify for advanced placement by one or more of the following 
means: 1) by passing a proficiency examination administered by a teaching 
department at NCSU; 2) by attaining a sufficient predicted grade in English 
(PGE) which is based on the SAT Verbal score or English Achievement test and 
the high school record, including grade point average and class rank; 3) by 



36 



i 



attaining a sufficient score on the Mathematics Achievement Test which is 
administered during Freshman Orientation if the student has not already sub- 
mitted scores; 4) by meeting a specific minimum score on certain of the CEEB 
Advanced Placement Program ( APP) examinations; and 5) by attaining at least a 
minimum score (generally 3) on certain of the College Level Examination Pro- 
gram (CLEP) subject tests. 

OUT-OF-STATE STUDENTS 

Undergraduate applicants from outside North Carolina may be required to 
meet more competitive standards for admission than N. C. residents. North 
Carolina State University is limited to accepting not more than 18 percent of total 
new undergraduate students from outside the State. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

North Carolina State University welcomes transfer applicants, and in recent 
years, more than 25 percent of our graduates started their college programs at 
other institutions. 

A transfer student should present at least 28 semester hours (or 42 quarter 
hours) of satisfactory (C or better) college-level work with a minimum overall 2.0 
(C) average on all college work attempted and be eligible to return to the last 
institution regularly attended. Many programs require a higher minimum grade 
point average for admission. Individual official transcripts must be submitted 
from each institution attended. The college credits must have been earned at a 
regionally accredited institution and should include a college-level math or the 
high school record must be submitted to show proper background. Applications 
of students from non-regionally accredited institutions will be reviewed by the 
Admissions Committee. 

Students who graduated from high school in June of 1988 or later must submit 
a high school record to verify that they have met minimum admissions require- 
ments as outlined in the Freshman Admissions section of this catalog. Exceptions 
to this requirement are students who will have earned an A. A., A.S. or A.F.A. 
degree before enrolling at NCSU. Individuals who do not have the minimum 
admissions requirements at the high school level must complete at the college 
level 6 semesters or 9 quarter hours each of English, mathematics, science and 
social science to be eligible to transfer. 

Applications from technical institutes, technical colleges, and technical pro- 
grams at community colleges are evaluated on an individual basis. Credits from 
such programs are generally not considered for automatic transfer, but qualified 
students who are otherwise admissible may receive transfer credit by prescribed 
procedures. These procedures include credit by examination and/or validation 
by the appropriate subject matter academic unit on the North Carolina State 
University campus. 

Once applicants have been accepted and have indicated their intention to 
enroll, their transcripts are evaluated by the college to which application is made 
to determine the exact amount of credit applicable toward a degree at North 



37 



Carolina State. A grade of C or better is required before a course may be 
considered for credit. Transcripts are not evaluated until applicant has been 
admitted. International students are carefully screened for evidence of English 
language proficiency, adequate financial backing and academic credential indi- 
cating potential for success. 

UNCLASSIFIED STUDENTS 

Unclassified students are those working for college credit but not enrolled in a 
degree-granting program. Admission as an unclassified student requires the 
recommendation of the dean of the school in which the student wishes to enroll. 
Unclassified students must meet the same entrance requirements as regular 
degree students and must meet the same academic requirement to continue. If, at 
a later date, unclassified students wish to change to regular status, their credits 
will be evaluated in terms of the requirements of their intended curriculum. 

LIFELONG EDUCATION STUDENTS 

The Lifelong Education Student classification is designed for residents of the 
Triangle area who have not been formally admitted into a degree program at the 
University but who wish to enroll in courses offered by the University. Lifelong 
Education Students are limited to a maximum course load of two courses plus one 
physical education course each semester or summer session. 

Lifelong Education Student applications should be made through the Division 
for Lifelong Education, at the McKimmon Center, corner of Western Boulevard 
and Gorman Street. If Lifelong Education Students wish to become degree 
candidates at a later date, they must make application through the Admissions 
Office. Lifelong Education Students who are considering a degree program are 
encouraged to make an appointment with the Admissions Office to discuss 
entrance requirements. 

SERVICEMEN'S OPPORTUNITY COLLEGES 

NCSU has been designated as a member of the Servicemen's Opportunity 
Colleges (SOC) General Registry— a network of institutions sponsored by the 
American Association of State Colleges and Universities and the American 
Association of Community and Junior Colleges. Servicemen are encouraged to 
take college level courses offered by accredited institutions and made available to 
military personnel through SOC. Records are evaluated, files are retained, coun- 
seling is provided, and recognition is given for learning through noninstitutional 
sources when appropriate. Transcripts must be sent to the Director of Admis- 
sions directly from the institution offering the course. 

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP) 

A national program administered by the College Board, CLEP is a series of 
examinations that allows students to show knowledge in a wide range of areas. 
The tests are used to grant credit for corresponding college courses. There are 5 
General and 30 Subject Examinations. At NCSU credit is granted primarily for 
Subject Examination, as these provide a more satisfactory evaluation of subject 

38 



I 



p 



matter covered in NCSU courses. Scores and essays, if required, are reviewed 
and credit granted by the department offering the corresponding course. 

Information regarding credit, and testing dates and locations can be obtained 
in the Counseling Center, 2000 Harris Hall, 737-2423. 

CLEP Subject Examinations provide a more satisfactory evaluation of mate- 
rial covered in courses offered at NCSU and are, therefore, recommended over 
the General Examinations. 

Both General and Subject Examinations at NCSU are administered during 
the third calendar line of each month except December and February. It is 
necessary to register for the examinations at least three weeks before the first of 
the week in which they are to be given. The examinations are administered 
through the Counseling Center at N.C. Central University, Durham, N.C. (919) 
683-6336. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS 

Procedures and policies governing graduate admission are outlined in a separ- 
ate catalog issued by the Graduate School. For a copy of the Graduate School 
catalog write: 

Dean of the Graduate School 

104 Peele Hall 

Box 7102 

North Carolina State University 

Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7102 



Orientation 



The University provides a series of orientation programs for all new freshmen. 
Students attend their program with other freshmen who have been admitted to 
the same college, the University Undesignated Program, or the University Tran- 
sition Program. Meetings and conferences with faculty and student leaders 
acquaint new students with the academic opportunities and expectations asso- 
ciated with their chosen curriculum and with the extracurricular activities and 
organizations available on campus. 

For more information, contact the Division of Undergraduate Studies, 206 
Holladay Hall (737-7528) or the Department of Student Development, 2007 
Harris Hall (737-2443). 

REQUIRED IMMUNIZATION DOCUMENTATION 

North Carolina state law requires all new enrollees in the university system to 
present proof of immunization prior to completion of registration. 

Verified proof of immunization against rubella, measles, tetanus and diphthe- 
ria must be presented to the University Student Health Service no later than 30 
days prior to registration. 

If this requirement is not met, dismissal from school is mandatory under the 
law. For assistance, contact the Student Health Service (919 737-2563). 

39 



Registration 

Registration is conducted by using the Telephonic Registration Access to 
Computerized Scheduling (TRACS) system. This system allows students to use 
any touch-tone telephone to register for classes. A Schedule of Courses is available 
for every semester prior to the beginning of the registration period. This contains 
all necessary instructions for completing registration. 

Registration consists of three steps: (1) Meeting with advisers to determine 
course requirements and to obtain a Personal Identification Number (PIN); (2) 
Registering for courses using the TRACS system; and (3) Paying tuition and fees 
and all other debts to the University by the established deadlines. Instructions for 
completing registration are issued each semester and summer session. 

For more information, contact the Department of Registration and Records, 
1000 Harris Hall, 737-2572. 

INTERINSTITUTIONAL REGISTRATION 

A regularly enrolled undergraduate degree student who is enrolled in at least 
eight credit hours at North Carolina State University may take, under certain 
conditions, course work at one of the Raleigh colleges, at the University of North 
Carolina at Chapel Hill, at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro or at 
Duke University. Interinstitutional registration forms and all registration 
procedures are available from Registration and Records. 

SCHEDULE CHANGES-DROPS AND ADDS 

Courses may be added during the first two weeks of a regular semester. All 
courses may be dropped without regard to course load during the first two weeks 
of a regular semester. During the third and fourth weeks of a semester, full-time 
undergraduate students who wish to drop courses at any level and whose aca- 
demic load would thereby fall below the twelve-hour minimum course load may 
do so only for documented medical reasons or other verified, unforeseen grounds 
of personal or family hardship. 

For undergraduate students, exceptions to the drop policies require the 
recommendation of a student's adviser (or the departmental coordinator of advis- 
ing or the department head) and approval by the dean of the student's college. 
Students who wish to drop all courses for which they are enrolled, must withdraw 
from the university for the remainder of the semester or summer term in which 
they are enrolled. 



40 



Tuition and Fees 



North Carolina Resident — $522.00 per semester. 

Nonresident — $2,773.00 per semester. 

A statement of tuition and fees is mailed to each preregistered student before 
the beginning of any term. The statement must be returned with full payment or 
complete financial assistance information by the due date appearing on the 
statement. Normally the due date is two weeks before classes begin. Non- 
preregistered students are required to pay their tuition and fees at registration. 
Fees are the same for both residents and nonresidents and are required of all 
students. Nonresident students are required to pay an additional $2,251 per 
semester for tuition. 

ESTIMATED ANNUAL UNDERGRADUATE EXPENSES 





First 


Second 




Tuition and Fees 


Semester 


Semester 


Year 


(a) N.C. Residents 


$ 522.00 


$ 522.00 


$1,044.00 


(b) Out-of-State Residents 


2,773.00 


2,773.00 


5,546.00 


Room Rent 


675.00 


675.00 


1,350.00 


Meals 


840.00 


840.00 


1,680.00 


Books and Supplies 


250.00 


250.00 


500.00 


Other personal expenses 


500.00 


500.00 


1,000.00 


TOTAL 








(a) N.C. Residents 


$2,787.00 


$2,787.00 


$ 5,574.00 


(b) Out-of-State Residents 


$5,038.00 


$5,038.00 


$10,076.00 



NOTE: All charges are subject to change without notice. 

EXPENSES OTHER THAN TUITION AND GENERAL FEES 

Application Fee: A non-refundable fee of $35 must accompany each application 
for admission. 

Room Rent: New incoming students receive room reservation instructions in the 
letter of acceptance. Continuing students are provided a card with instructions 
at their residence hall rooms. The 1990-91 charge for room rent ranged from 
$675 per semester for most residence halls to $965 for North Hall and South 
Hall. 

Meals: During their first academic year, new freshmen electing to reside on- 
campus are required to participate in one of the university's available meal 
plans. Meal plan costs in 1990-91 ranged from $840 to $900. Other students pay 
for meals individually at the various dining facilities available both on and 
near the campus. 

Books and Supplies: Books and supplies are usually purchased during the first 
week of classes directly from the Students Supply Stores. Allow approximately 
$250 per semester for purchasing books and supplies. 



41 



Personal Expenses: Personal expenses vary widely among students but the esti- 
mate of $500 is based on what students report that they spend on these items. 

Administrative Management Fee: A special administrative management fee of 
$250 per semester and $150 per summer session is required from a contracting 
agency sponsoring international students whose programs are coordinated 
through the University's Office of International Visitors. 

Cooperative Education Program Fee: Required of all participating co-op students 
for each semester in which they are enrolled in an off-campus work assign- 
ment. This fee, set at $145 for the 1990 fall semester, the 1991 spring semester, 
or the combined 1991 summer sessions, is used for partial support of the 
Cooperative Education Program staff in job development and placement activ- 
ities. Students paying this fee are entitled to all university services, facilities, 
and programs during the semester or combined summer sessions for which 
they are enrolled. 

College of Engineering Computing Fee: Effective with the 1991 fall semester, all 
students enrolled in the College of Engineering, both graduate and under- 
graduate, will be billed a $100 per semester fee to support the Engineering 
Computing Facility. Payment of the fee will provide students with access to 
standalone workstations which comprise the Engineering Computing Facility. 
During the 1991 summer sessions, the 1990 freshman Engineering cohort, 
and all other students in the College of Engineering who enroll in E 115, CSC 
110 and CSC 1 12 will be billed the Computing Fee at a rate of $35 per session. 
Beginning with the 1992 summer sessions, all College of Engineering students 
who enroll in a summer session will be billed the computer fee at a rate of $35 
per session. Engineering and computer science students who enroll in ten-week 
courses will be billed at a rate of $70. 

Students who enroll in a COOP work session will not be billed for the 
Computing Fee unless they also enroll in NCSU courses. 

Fees Related to Laboratory and Computer Courses: Students enrolled in desig- 
nated lab or computer courses must pay a course fee of $25 to offset partially the 
cost of necessary supplies, equipment, and operation. The maximum course fee 
to be charged to any student will be $50 per semester or summer session 
regardless of the number of designated courses taken. These fees will be 
assessed for courses carried at the end of the official enrollment period, i.e., the 
end of the second week of a semester or the end of the fourth class day during a 
summer session. 

Departments may waive a course fee when: students are auditing a desig- 
nated course in which the conditions of the audit preclude any usage of lab or 
computing resources; or students in special projects, independent research, 
and similar courses which have a designated fee, are not using a university lab 
course but who mistakenly are registered for the lab section; or students are 
taking only the lecture portion of a designated lab course but are mistakenly 
registered for the lab section. 

Departments may not waive a course fee when: a designated lab or computer 
fee course is dropped after the official enrollment date, or withdrawal from the 
university occurs after the official enrollment date, or state law or policy allows 
for a waiver of tuition (i.e., faculty/staff, over 65 years of age, exchange pro- 
grams, etc.) 

42 



Students who withdraw from the university after the official enrollment date 
may petition the Fee Appeals Committee, and refunds of course fees will be 
handled on a prorated basis as are refunds of other fees. 

NOTE: All charges are subject to change without notice. 

REQUIRED FEES 

Required fees are levied for services, facilities, and programs available to all 
students whether or not the student takes advantage of them. Students are 
assessed fees based on the course load they are taking. An itemization of required 
fees and other detailed information concerning expenses or related data can be 
obtained by contacting the University Cashier's Office, Box 7213, Raleigh, North 
Carolina 27695-7213 (919-737-2986). 

REFUND POLICY 

A student who officially withdraws from school during the first two weeks of 
classes will receive receive a tuition and fees refund of the full amount paid less a 
$25 registration fee. After the two-week period, no refunds will be made. 

In some instances, circumstances justify the waiving of rules regarding 
refunds. An example might be withdrawal because of sickness. Students have the 
privilege of appeal to the Fee Appeals Committee when they believe special 
consideration is merited. Applications for such appeals may be obtained from the 
University Cashier's Office, 1101 Pullen Hall. 

RESIDENCE STATUS FOR TUITION PURPOSES 

The basis for determining the appropriate tuition charge rests upon whether a 
student is a resident or a nonresident for tuition purposes. Each student must 
make a statement as to the length of his or her residence in North Carolina, with 
assessment by the institution of that statement to be conditioned by the following. 

Residence. To qualify as a resident for tuition purposes, a person must become 
a legal resident and remain a legal resident for at least twelve months imme- 
diately prior to classification. Thus, there is a distinction between legal residence 
and residence for tuition purposes. Furthermore, twelve months legal residence 
means more than simple abode in North Carolina. In particular, it means main- 
taining a domicile (permanent home of indefinite duration) as opposed to "main- 
taining a mere temporary residence or abode incident to enrollment in an institu- 
tion of higher education." The burden of establishing facts which justify 
classification of a student as a resident entitled to in-state tuition rates is on the 
applicant for such classification, who must show his or her entitlement by the 
preponderance (the greater part) of the residentiary information. 

Initiative. Being classified a resident for tuition purposes is contingent on the 
student's seeking such status and providing all information that the institution 
may require in making the determination. 

Parents' Domicile. If an individual, irrespective of age, has living parent(s) or 
court-appointed guardian of the person, the domicile of such parent(s) or 
guardian is, prima facie, the domicile of the individual; but this prima facie 
evidence of the individual's domicile may or may not be sustained by other 

43 



information. Further, nondomiciliary status of parents is not deemed prima facie 
evidence of the applicant child's status if the applicant has lived (though not 
necessarily legally resided) in North Carolina for the five years preceding enrol- 
lment or re-registration. 

Effect of Marriage. Marriage alone does not prevent a person from becoming 
or continuing to be a resident for tuition purposes, nor does marriage in any 
circumstance insure that a person will become or continue to be a resident for 
tuition purposes. Marriage and the legal residence of one's spouse are, however, 
relevant information in determining residentiary intent. Furthermore, if both a 
husband and his wifeare legal residents of North Carolina and ifoneof them has 
been a legal resident longer than the other, then the longer duration may be 
claimed by either spouse in meeting the twelve-month requirement of in-state 
tuition status. 

Military Personnel. A North Carolinian who serves outside the state in the 
armed forces does not lose North Carolina domicile simply by reason of such 
service. Students from the military may prove retention or establishment of 
residence by reference, as in other cases, to residentiary acts accompanied by 
residentiary intent. 

Active military personnel assigned to North Carolina and their military 
dependents may be eligible to receive the benefit of the in-state tuition rate under 
G.S. 116-143.3. A student who qualifies for the in-state tuition rate solely under 
this statute is not considered a resident but merely eligible for the benefit of the 
in-state tuition rate. Application for eligibility to be charged the in-state tuition 
rate under G.S. 116-143.3 must be made prior to initial enrollment or re- 
enrollment for which the student claims the benefit. Further, application for 
such eligibility must similarly be made prior to the outset of each successive 
academic year of enrollment. Appropriate applications for the benefit of the 
in-state tuition rate are available in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 1 12 
Peele Hall. 

Grace Period. If a person (1) has been a bona fide legal resident, (2) has 
consequently been classified a resident for tuition purposes, and (3) has subse- 
quently lost North Carolina legal residence while enrolled at a public institution 
of higher education, that person may continue to enjoy the in-state tuition rate for 
a grace period of twelve months measured from the date on which North Carolina 
legal residence was lost. If the twelve months ends during an academic term for 
which the person is enrolled at a state institution of higher education, the grace 
period extends, in addition, to the end of that term. The fact of marriage to one 
who continues domiciled outside North Carolina does not by itself cause loss of 
legal residence, marking the beginning of the grace period. 

Minors. Minors (persons under 18 years of age) usually have the domicile of 
their parents, but certain special cases are recognized by the residence classifica- 
tion statute in determining residence for tuition purposes. 

(a) If a minor's parents live apart, the minor's domicile is deemed to be North 
Carolina for the time period(s) that either parent, as a North Carolina legal 
resident, may claim and does claim the minor as a tax dependent, even if other 
law or judicial act assigns the minor's domicile outside North Carolina. A minor 
thus deemed to be a legal resident will not, upon achieving majority before 



44 



enrolling at an institution of higher education, lose North Carolina legal resi- 
dence if that person (1) upon becoming an adult "acts, to the extent that the 
person's degree of actual emancipation permits, in a manner consistent with bona 
fide legal residence in North Carolina" and (2) "begins enrollment at an institu- 
tion of higher education not later than the fall academic term next following 
completion of education prerequisite to admission at such institution." 

(b) If a minor has lived for five or more consecutive years with relatives (other 
than parents) who are domiciled in North Carolina and if the relatives have 
functioned during this time as if they were personal guardians, the minor will be 
deemed a resident for tuition purposes for an enrolled term commencing imme- 
diately after at least five years in which these circumstances have existed. If 
under this consideration a minor is deemed to be a resident for tuition purposes 
immediately prior to his or her eighteenth birthday, that person on achieving 
majority will be deemed a legal resident of North Carolina of at least 12 months 
duration. This provision acts to confer in-state tuition status even in the face of 
other provisions of law to the contrary; however, a person deemed a resident of 12 
months duration pursuant to this provision continues to be a legal resident of the 
state only so long as he or she does not abandon North Carolina domicile. 

Lost but Regained Domicile. If a student ceases enrollment at or graduates 
from an institution of higher education while classified a resident for tuition 
purposes and then both abandons and reacquires North Carolina domicile within 
a 12-month period, that person, if he or she continues to maintain the required 
domicile into re-enrollment at an institution of higher education, may re-enroll at 
the in-state tuition rate without having to meet the usual 12-month duration 
requirement. However, any one person may receive the benefit of this provision 
only once. 

Change of Status. A student admitted to initial enrollment in an institution (or 
permitted to re-enroll following an absence from the institutional program which 
involved a formal withdrawal from enrollment) must be classified by the admit- 
ting institution either as a resident or as a nonresident for tuition purposes prior 
to actual enrollment. A residence status classification once assigned (and final- 
ized pursuant to any appeal properly taken) may be changed thereafter (with 
corresponding change in billing rates) only at intervals corresponding with the 
established primary divisions of the academic year. 

Transfer Students. When a student transfers from one North Carolina public 
institution of higher education to another, he or she is treated as a new student by 
the institution to which he or she is transferring and must be assigned an initial 
residence status classification for tuition purposes. 

Prevailing North Carolina Law. General Statute (G.S.) 116-143.1 is the 
prevailing statute. governing residence status classification. Copies of the appli- 
cable law and of the implementing regulations are available for inspection in the 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions, 112 Peele Hall. 



45 



Financial Aid 

To be considered for assistance by the Financial Aid Office, a student and his or 
her parents must complete and return for calculation purposes the College 
Scholarship Service Financial Aid Form (FAF). The form is available from both 
high school guidance counselors and from the North Carolina State University 
Financial Aid Office. All undergraduate applicants for financial aid must indi- 
cate on the FAF that they wish consideration for the Pell Grant. This is done 
automatically— at no additional charge— if the appropriate Pell Grant items are 
marked on the FAF. The FAF should be completed preferably by March 1 of the 
year prior to fall semester enrollment and no later than October 1 of the year 
prior to spring semester enrollment. Transfers and continuing students should 
check with the Financial Aid Office regarding any other information which may 
be needed for aid consideration. North Carolina residents with substantial need 
should apply for the N. C. Student Incentive Grant by listing College Foundation, 
Inc., to receive a copy of the FAF. Information about this program is available 
from the high school counselors, the Financial Aid Office, and College Founda- 
tion. Inc. (P.O. Box 12100. Raleigh, N.C. 27605) administrators of the program. 

Awards are made to applicants on the basis of financial need, satisfactory 
academic progress, and timely submission of the FAF to Princeton. N.J. Deter- 
mination of a student's need is based on estimated educational costs and a consid- 
eration of the family's financial strength, which primarily includes consideration 
of the family's income as well as the student's summer savings, size of family, 
number of children in post-high school institutions, family asset holdings, debts, 
and other resources that may be available for use such as veterans' benefits. 
Vocational Rehabilitation assistance, etc. 

Aid is available on a non-discriminatory basis to all qualifying students. These 
awards are usually offered in financial aid "packages" which consist of a combi- 
nation of scholarship gift aid (grants), loan, and/or work-study award, depend- 
ing upon the degree of need. Continuing students must have a satisfactory record 
of academic progress in order to renew their aid. The Policy on Satisfactory 
Academic Progress for Financial Aid Eligibility is available in the Financial Aid 
Office. A new application must be submitted each year for continued aid. 

NEED-BASED SCHOLARSHIPS FOR FRESHMEN 
AND CONTINUING STUDENTS 

There are a large number of special scholarships which are based upon both 
demonstrated financial need and academic achievement. These scholarships are 
administered by the university's Financial Aid Office as well as by various 
academic departments on campus. Some of these scholarships have curricular. 
geographic and other restrictions. A list of these scholarships and the specific 
criteria which may apply to them may be found in the handbook published by the 
N. C. State Financial Aid Office. Filing the Financial Aid Form by early March 
will assure that the student is considered for all need-based scholarships for 
which he/she is eligible. 



46 



GRANTS 

Pell Grants. All applicants for financial aid who have never received a bache- 
lor's degree must apply for this program. Eligibility for a Pell Grant is deter- 
mined by the Federal Government. 

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants. These grants are made 
from federal funds to undergraduate students from low-income families. They 
are especially useful in assisting promising students who demonstrate need. 
These grants are determined by the University's Financial Aid Office. 

Minority Presence Grants. Under the Board of Governors' general Minority 
Presence Grant Program, African-American students may be eligible for special 
financial assistance if they are residents of North Carolina, enrolled for at least 
three hours of degree-credit coursework, and demonstrate financial need. 

The N. C. Student Incentive Grant. This program provides grants to legal 
residents of North Carolina with substantial need. Entering freshmen and stu- 
dents who have received the grant before have priority for future grants. Grants 
range up to $1,500 per academic year. 

ATHLETIC GRANTS-IN-AID 

Athletic awards are made by the Department of Athletics to students who meet 
the established qualifications for such awards. These awards are based upon 
athletic ability, rather than upon need. 

LOANS 

Perkins Loans (formerly National Direct Student Loans). Both under- 
graduate and graduate students carrying at least half-time academic loads may 
be awarded these long-term, low-interest loans. These loans are need-based. Six 
months after ceasing to be enrolled at least half-time, a student must begin 
paying interest on his or her loan at 5% per year as well as assuming a $30 per 
month minimum repayment obligation. In order to establish a repayment sche- 
dule, borrowers are expected to have exit interviews at the Student Accounts 
Office in Suite 1101 Student Services Center just prior to graduation or other 
termination of studies. 

Institutional Loans. A limited amount of other long-term loan money is avail- 
able in several funds, and loans made therefrom are on essentially the same 
liberal terms as the Perkins Loans. 
Insured Student Loan Programs. 

Robert T. Stafford Loan Program (formerly Guaranteed Student Loan): These 
low interest, deferred payment funds are Federal need-based assistance. 
Interest rate will vary (approximately 8%). Application for this program beg- 
ins with the FAF. Further application is necessary through the individual 
lender and requires college certification. The North Carolina lending agency is 
College Foundation, Inc. (919) 821-4771. 
Supplemental Loan for Students (SLS) and 
Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS): 

These loan programs are designed for independent students (SLS) and for 
parents of dependent students (PLUS). These programs are not need-based. 

47 



Payment options along with interest rates will vary from 10-12%. Application 
requires college certification and is then submitted to the individual lender. 
The North Carolina lending agency is College Foundation, Inc. (919) 821-4771. 

Emergency Short-Term Loans. These loans are available in small amounts 
(usually not exceeding $100) to enable any full-time enrolled student with a 
previous good repayment record to meet unexpected expenses. These loans are 
usually to be repaid within 30 days and are not extended beyond the end of a term 
or graduation. 

COLLEGE WORK-STUDY PROGRAM 

The federally supported College Work-Study Program provides jobs on cam- 
pus for students who qualify with need in the same manner as is required for 
scholarship or long-term loan assistance. Though individual pay rates vary with 
the job, basic hourly pay rates comply with the current minimum wage 
requirements. 

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT SERVICE 

The Financial Aid Office coordinates an employment service to assist students 
with information about the possibilities of part-time or summer work. No partic- 
ular academic or economic qualifications are required to obtain jobs on-or off- 
campus outside the College Work-Study Program. A current listing of job open- 
ings is maintained at the Financial Aid Office. 

A handbook which gives a detailed explanation of the need-based aid applica- 
tion and award process and the types of aid available may be obtained upon 
request from the Financial Aid Office, 2005 Harris Hall. 



Student Housing 



North Carolina State University furnishes housing for approximately 7,126 
students. The university operates residence halls which house 3,865 men and 
2,391 women students. In addition, 300 apartments are available for married 
students, single parents and graduate students in E. S. King Village, and 15 
university-owned fraternity and sorority houses accommodate 570 students. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

The residence halls are operated to provide opportunities through a variety of 
group living experiences which complement and expand the students' educa- 
tional experiences. Each hall is staffed with selected students, both graduate and 
undergraduate, who report directly to professionally trained people in their area 
and to the Director of Housing and Residence Life. Staff members are available 
to help students initiate programs and activities and to advise and assist residents 
in any way possible. 



48 



Living arrangements in buildings vary. Six high-rise buildings are arranged 
in suites of four or five rooms that share a bath; the other buildings have a center 
corridor with rooms opening on to it. Rooms are furnished but students must 
provide bed linen, pillows and towels. 

Eligibility. To be eligible for university housing one must enroll as a regular 
full-time student (an undergraduate must carry a minimum of 12 credit hours 
per semester). 

NCSU guarantees on-campus housing for the first year to all new freshmen. 
During the second semester of the freshman year, all resident freshmen partici- 
pate in a random selection process which determines housing eligibility for 
subsequent years. Students selected during the housing random selection process 
are guaranteed housing for their remaining three years. Other upperclass stu- 
dents, including graduate, transfer, and readmitted students are not guaranteed 
campus housing, but are housed on a space available basis. 

Room Costs and Reservations. The room cost for 1989-90 was $650 per 
semester for main-campus double rooms; this rate is subject to change on a year to 
year basis. 

Cancellation of Housing. Cancellation of housing applications must be made 
in writing as follows: 

a. In person at the Housing Assignments Office, Department of Housing and 
Residence Life, 1112 Pullen Hall, Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. 
and 5 p.m.; or 

b. mail addressed to the Housing Assignments Office, Department of Housing 
and Residence Life, Box 7315, NCSU, Raleigh, NC 27695-7315. 

The effective date of cancellation is the date notification is received by the 
Housing Assignments Office or the date the room is vacated, whichever is later. 

APARTMENTS FOR MARRIED STUDENTS, SINGLE PARENTS, AND 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 

The University operates 300 apartments in E. S. King Village for students with 
families, single parents and graduate students. The 1989-90 rental is $220 for a 
studio, $220 for a one-bedroom, and $245 for a two-bedroom including water only 
(gas is included in studio units). This rate is subject to change on a year to year 
basis. Information on availability and applications should be requested from 
Housing Assignments Office, Department of Housing and Residence Life, Box 
7315, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7315. 

OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 

Raleigh has a variety of privately owned apartments and houses available for 
rent to university students. A partial listing is located in the Housing Assign- 
ments Office, 1112 Pullen Hall. No listing is published because of the rapid 
turnover. 

The university does not operate a trailer parking area; however, privately 
owned parks are available within a reasonable distance of the campus. 



49 



FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES 

Twenty of the 25 general college fraternities and four of the eight general 
college sororities chartered at the university maintain chapter houses. Thirteen 
of the fraternities and two of the sororities are housed on Fraternity Court, a 
university-owned project; the remaining fraternities and sororities are located 
throughout the immediate community. 

Rental fees vary in fraternity and sorority houses depending on the individual 
chapter, but are approximately the same as the residence hall rates. 



Academic Policies and 
Procedures 

ACADEMIC ADVISING 

Every regularly enrolled student is assigned for academic advising to a faculty 
member who is normally a member of the department which is, or is most likely 
to become, the student's major department. 

Responsibilities of the Student 

Students have the primary responsibility for planning their individual pro- 
grams and meeting graduation requirements. This involves: (1) keeping up-to- 
date with university, school, and departmental curricular requirements through 
materials available from the faculty advisers or departmental coordinator of 
advising; (2) keeping informed of academic deadlines and changes in academic 
policies; and (3) consulting with the faculty adviser or departmental coordinator 
of advising during each registration period, following notification of academic 
warning status, and at other times as needed. 

Responsibilities of the Faculty Adviser 

Although students have the primary responsibility for planning their pro- 
grams, faculty advisers are expected to: (1) be available for conferences at 
appropriate times and places about which their advisees have been informed; (2) 
provide accurate information about academic regulations and procedures, 
course prerequisites, and graduation requirements; (3) assist students in plan- 
ning academic programs suited to their interests and abilities and their career 
objectives; (4) discuss with their advisees appropriate course choices in fulfilling 
curriculum requirements as well as possible consequences of various alternative 
course choices: (5) inform their advisees when the advisee's proposed course 
selections conflict with university academic or curricular regulations; (6) assist 
advisees with following proper procedures for such things as exceptions to the 
course drop deadlines, auditing a course before or after taking it for credit, 
taking a course under the credit by examination policy, registering for 19 or more 
credit hours, registering for CRC interinstitutional courses, or repeating a course 

50 



I 



previously passed; (7) refer their advisees for special testing or counseling as 
needed; (8) assist their advisees in considering the appropriateness of academic 
adjustments where these become necessary in cases of serious injury or illness. 

Responsibilities of the Coordinator of Advising 

Each college or department has a coordinator of advising who is responsible 
for:(l)assigning, training, and supervising faculty advisers; (2) providing up-to- 
date, printed course and curriculum information for advisers and students; (3) 
reassigning to another adviser any student who so requests; and (4) assisting any 
student who wants to major in the coordinator's area of study but is ineligible at 
the time to transfer into it. Students in this category keep their adviser in the 
department in which they are enrolled but consult additionally with the coordi- 
nator of advising for the department offering the curriculum in which they wish 
to enroll. Whenever appropriate, the coordinator will advise students that they 
should consider alternative curricula. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Regular undergraduate degree students are classified at the beginning of each 
semester and summer session. The required number of hours of each classifica- 
tion is: 

Classification Semester Hours of Earned Credit 

Freshman (FR) Fewer than 28 

Sophomore (SO) 28 or more, but fewer than 60 

Junior (JR) 60 or more, but fewer than 92 

Senior (SR) 92 or more 

Agricultural Institute students are designated as first (01) year if they have 
earned fewer than 28 semester credits and second (02) year if they have earned 28 
or more semester credits. 

Unclassified Students (UN) are those working for college credit but not 
enrolled in a degree-granting program. Admission as an unclassified student 
requires the recommendation of the dean of the school in which the student 
wishes to enroll. Unclassified students must meet the same entrance require- 
ments as regular degree students and must meet the same academic require- 
ments to continue. If, at a later date, unclassified students wish to change to 
regular degree status, their credits will be evaluated in terms of the require- 
ments of their intended curriculum. 

Undergraduate Studies (UGS) is the classification used for U. S. citizens who 
have not obtained a baccalaureate degree and who wish to take courses but who 
are not currently admitted to a degree program. To be eligible to register as a 
UGS student, a person should: (a) have acquired a high school diploma or a GED 
certificate; and (b) not have been suspended from any college or university 
(including NCSU) for two full semesters not including summer sessions; and (c) 
not be a degree candidate at NCSU; or (d) be a high school student who has been 
recommended by his/her school and approved by the Undergraduate Admissions 



51 



Office to take lower level courses. Visiting summer sessions students and visiting 
interinstitutional students do not necessarily have to meet the above criteria. 

Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) is the classification used by U.S. citizens 
who wish to take courses beyond the baccalaureate degree but who are not 
currently admitted to a degree program. This classification is closed to interna- 
tional students with the following exceptions: (a) spouses of regularly enrolled 
NCSU degree students; or (b) students enrolled in special programs such as AID, 
FAO. etc., who are approved in advance by the International Student Office and 
the Graduate School. 

All UGS and PBS students must register through the Division for Lifelong 
Education which is located in the Jane S. McKimmon Center for Extension and 
Continuing Education. Persons found eligible to study as UGS or PBS students are 
not to assume that they have received formal admission to the University as either 
undergraduate or graduate degree candidates. To become a degree candidate, 
formal application must be made through the Undergraduate Admissions Office 
or the Graduate School. 

The maximum course load for all UGS and PBS students is two courses plus 
one physical education course each semester or summer session. They may enroll 
in any course offered by the University, provided they have satisfied any required 
prerequisites and space is available. The academic standards applicable to 
undergraduate degree candidates at the University, including the Suspension 
Policy, apply to UGS and PBS students. 

SEMESTER COURSE LOAD 

For undergraduate degree students the maximum course load is 21 credit 
hours a semester and two courses plus PE in a summer session. To carry more 
than the maximum, students must obtain the approval of their academic adviser 
and of their school dean. Undergraduate students who propose to register for 19 
or more credit hours a semester must obtain approval from their academic 
adviser. First semester freshmen with a UPGA of less than 2.0 and continuing 
students with a GPA of less than 2.0 are advised to carry no more than 16 credit 
hours a semester. 

For undergraduate studies students (UGS) the maximum course load is two 
courses plus PE in a regular semester or summer session. Exceptions must be 
approved by the Admissions Office. 

The minimum course load for full-time undergraduate degree students is 12 
credit hours, except in their final semester when a lesser number may be taken if 
that is all the student needs to fulfill the requirements for a degree. In all cases, to 
receive financial aid a student must meet the minimum course load requirements 
of the appropriate funding agency. 

The number of hours for which a student is officially enrolled is that number in 
which the student is enrolled for credit at the end of the second week of classes (i.e., 
the last day to vnthdraw or drop a course with a refund). 



52 



GRADING SYSTEM 

(Definition of Letter Grades and Grade Points) 

Grade Definition Grade Points Per Credit Hour 

A Excellent 4 

B Good 3 
C Satisfactory ("Passing" for graduate 

students) 2 

D Marginal 1 

NC No Credit 

(The following grades are not used in the calculation of grade point averages.) 

S Satisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

U Unsatisfactory (Credit-only and certain other courses) 

CR Credit by Examination or Advanced Placement 

IN Incomplete 

LA Temporarily Late 

AU Audit 

NR No Recognition Given for Audit 

W Withdrawal or Late Drop 

Explanation of Letter Grades 

D— Marginal. This grade will be used to recognize that a student's performance 
was marginal but clearly better than that of students who receive NC. 

U— Unsatisfactory. This is used to indicate that the student is not to receive 
credit for a credit-only or other course for which the passing grade would be S 

(Satisfactory). 

CR— Credit. This is used by the registrar to indicate course credit received by 
examination or advanced placement as certified by appropriate departments or 
schools. This grade shall be awarded only when the advanced placement testing 
indicates that the quality of the student's work in the course would have been 
expected to be of C or higher level. 

IN— Incomplete. This is a temporary grade. At the discretion of the instructor, 
students may be given an IN grade for work not completed because of a serious 
interruption in their work not caused by their own negligence. An IN must not be 
used, however, as a substitute for an NC when the student's performance in the 
course is deserving of No Credit. An IN is only appropriate when the student's 
record in the course is such that the successful completion of particular assign- 
ments, projects, or tests missed as a result of a documented serious event would 
enable that student to pass the course. Only work missed may be averaged into the 
grades already recorded for that student. 

An IN grade must be made up by the end of the next regular semester (not 
including summer sessions) in which the student is enrolled, provided that this 
period is not longer than twelve months from the end of the semester or summer 
session in which the work was due. In the event that the instructor or department 
offering the course is not able to provide a student with the opportunity to make 
up the incomplete work by the end of the next regular semester in which the 
student is enrolled or within twelve months, whichever is shorter, the instructor 



53 



or department offering the course must notify the student and the Department of 
Registration and Records of the date of the extended deadline for removing the 

IN grade. 

Any IN grade not removed by the end of the next regular semester in which the 
student is enrolled or by the end of twelve months, whichever is shorter, or by the 
extended deadline authorized by the instructor or department offering the 
course and recorded by the Department of Registration and Records will auto- 
matically become a No Credit (NC) grade and will count as a course attempted. 

Students must not register again for any courses in which they have IN grades; 
such registration does not remove IN grades, and the completion of the course on 
the second occasion will automatically result in an NC for the incompleted course. 

LA— Temporarily Late. The LA is an emergency symbol to be used only when 
grades cannot be reported by the teaching department or the professor on time. 
The LA differs from the IN grade in that the student receiving the LA has 
completed the work of the course including the examination. 

AU— Audit. This is used to indicate that a student has successfully audited a 
course by attending class regularly and completing the instructor's require- 
ments. 

NR— No Recognition Given for Audit. This grade is given if the instructor 
concludes that the auditor has gained little from the course due to poor attend- 
ance or failure to fulfill the mstructor's requirements. 

W— Withdrawal or Late Drop. The W will be used to indicate on all students' 
academic records all courses for which they have received official approval to 
drop or from which they have received official approval to withdraw after the 
deadlines for dropping 100- through 400-level or 500- and 600-level courses. 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

The number of credit hours attempted in a semester or summer session (for 
which grades of A. B, C, D, or NC are received) is divided into the total number of 
grade points earned to arrive at the Grade Point Average (GPA). The Grade Point 
Average will be calculated to three decimal points. 

For example, if a student takes 16 credit hours, earning an A in two 3-credit 
courses, a B in one 3-credit course, and a B in one 2-credit course, a C in a 3-credit 
course, and a NC in a 2-credit course, the grade point average would be: 

6 (credits of A) x 4 (grade points per credit hour) = 24 

5 (credits of B) x 3 (grade points per credit hour) = 15 

3 (credits of C) x 2 (grade points per credit hour) - 6 

2 (credits of NC) x (grade points per credit hour) = 

45 

The total number of grade points earned (45) divided by the number of credit 
hours attempted (16) equals the grade point average in this case 2.813. 



54 



ACADEMIC HONORS 

High ranking students in their freshman year are eligible for membership in 
Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha Lambda Delta. Both of these national scholastic 
honoraries require a 3.5 semester grade point average or better during the first 
semester or a cumulative average of 3.5 for both semesters during the freshman 
year. Juniors ranking in the top three percent of their class, seniors ranking in the 
top sixth of their class and outstanding graduate students are eligible for election 
to membership in Phi Kappa Phi, a national scholastic honor society. 

f 

Semester Dean's List — A full-time undergraduate student who earns a 

semester average of 3.5 or better on 12 to 14 hours of course work for which grade 
points are earned or a semester average of 3.25 or better on 15 or more hours of 
course work for which grade points are earned shall be placed on the Dean's List 
for that semester. 

Students are not eligible for the Dean's List in any semester in which they 
receive an NC or IN grade. When IN grades are resolved, however, students who 
are otherwise eligible shall be added retroactively to the Dean's List for that 
semester. Dean's List recognition shall be noted on the student's semester grade 
report and permanent academic record. 

Graduation with Honors— Undergraduate degree honor designations are: 

Cum Laude— for GPA 3.250 through 3.499 

Magna Cum Laude— for GPA 3.500 through 3.749 

Summa Cum Laude— for GPA 3.750 and above 
To be eligible for degree honor designations students must have completed at 
least two semesters and at least 30 credit hours at NCSU. 

Valedictorian, Salutatorian, and Highest Ranking Scholar in a College— 

To be eligible for consideration as valedictorian, salutatorian, or highest ranking 
scholar in a college, an undergraduate student must have received at least 100 
academic credits at North Carolina State University (including credit by exami- 
nation, advanced placement credit, and S/U courses.) These 100 credits may 
include no more than 20 transfer credits through programs officially sponsored 
by North Carolina State University. Specifically, these programs are Cooperat- 
ing Raleigh Colleges, National Student Exchange, International Student Ex- 
change, NCSU sponsored study abroad programs, and the affiliated hospital 
programs in Medical Technology. 

All students whose accumulated grade point averages, based on all courses 
attempted at North Carolina State University, make them eligible for one of 
these honors shall be so recognized. That is, in the case of ties, more than one 
student will receive the honor. However, in the case of ties for valedictorian, no 
salutatorian will be recognized. 

GRADE REPORTS 

At the end of each semester or summer session. Registration and Records issues 
a grade report showing all grades earned during that grading period, as well as 
the record of all previous work taken at this university. 



55 



As part of the registration process students will be asked to verify and/or 
complete an address form giving a mailing address to which grade reports and 
other university correspondence will be mailed. Students have the choice of 
having their grade reports sent either to their parents or guardians, or directly to 
themselves. 

Change of Name or Address— It is the student's responsibility to inform 
Registration and Records of any changes in name or address. Failure to do this 
may prevent prompt delivery of important university correspondence. Also, 
news stories about Dean's List students are sent to N.C. newspapers based on 
hometown information furnished Registration and Records. 

ACADEMIC WARNING 

All undergraduate students, including Lifelong Education student, who enroll 
in NCS Ufor the first time in the 1 990 Summer Sessions or thereafter will be subject 
to the Academic Warning policy set forth below. Beginning at the end of the 1 99 J^ fall 
semester, all undergraduate students, regardless of when they first enrolled in 
NCSU, will be subjected to this policy: 

At the end of any regular semester or summer session a notice of "ACADEMIC 
WARNING" shall be placed on the grade report of any undergraduate student 
who is not suspended at that time but whose cumulative GPA for courses taken at 
NCSU is less than 2.00. 

"ACADEMIC WARNING I" shall mean that a student's cumulative GPA at 
NCSU is less than 2.00 but greater than that which would result in Academic 
Warning II on the graduated retention schedule. Academic Warning I shall be 
assigned to those students who have: 

1-35 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 
equal to 1.60 but less than 2.00 
36-47 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 

equal to 1.70 but less than 2.00 
48-59 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 

equal to 1.80 but less than 2.00 
60-71 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 
equal to 1.90 but less than 2.00 
"ACADEMIC WARNING 11" shall mean that a student's cumulative GPA at 
NCSU is below the minimum required for continuation under the next step in the 
graduated retention schedule. It shall be assigned to those students who have: 
1-35 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 
equal to 1.50 but less than 1.60 
36-47 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 

equal to 1.60 but less than 1.70 
48-59 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 

equal to 1.70 but less than 1.80 
60-71 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 
equal to 1.80 but less than 1.90 



56 



72-83 credit hours attempted with a cumulative GPA greater than or 
equal to 1.90 but less than 2.00 
NOTE: "Credit hours attempted" in this policy means the total credit hours 
attempted at NCSU plus transferred credit hours from other institutions. 

ACADEMIC SUSPENSION POLICY 

All undergraduate students, including Lifelong Education students, who were 
enrolled in NCSU at any time prior to the 1990 Summer Sessions, will he subject to 
the Suspension policy set forth beloiv. Beginning at the end of the 1 99 Jt fall semester, 
all undergraduate students, regardless of when they first enrolled in NCSU, will be 
subject to this policy: 

The minimum eligibility standard for continued enrollment for any under- 
graduate student is defined as maintaining the required grade point average 
(GPA) for the number of credit hours attempted at NCSU plus transferred credit 
hours according to the following retention schedule: 

Minimum cumulative GPA 
Credit hours attempted plus required on all courses 

transferred credit hours taken at NCSU 

1-35 hours 1.50 

36-47 hours 1.60 

48-59 hours 1.70 

60-71 hours 1.80 

72-83 hours 1.90 

more than 83 hours 2.00 

PROBATION will be assigned to those students who fail to achieve the min- 
imum cumulative GPA required under the retention schedule. Students on pro- 
bation will be allowed to enroll for one additional regular semester for the 
purpose of achieving the minimum cumulative GPA as required under the 
retention schedule. Students on probation are not considered to be in good aca- 
demic standing. 

PROBATION signifies that serious deficiencies are present in a student's 
academic performance. Students on probation or ACADEMIC WARNING II 
will be required to have their academic records reviewed by their departmental 
academic adviser and the associate dean in their respective colleges before the 
end of the second week of the probation semester. 

SUSPENDED will be assigned to those students who fail to achieve the min- 
imum cumulative GPA required under the retention schedule following a semes- 
ter on probation. 

Suspended students who are attending a summer session for the purpose of 
improving their academic standing in order to regain eligibility for readmission 
to NCSU will have their suspension continued unless their performance in that 
summer session is sufficient to make them eligible for automatic readmission. 

Students will not be suspended at the end of a summer session nor at the end of 
their first regular semester at NCSU. 



57 



WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

An official withdrawal means that a student is allowed to drop, without aca- 
demic penalty, all of the courses for which he/she is registered in a given semester 
or summer session. For each semester, the official academic calendar indicates 
the dates for withdrawing with a refund (less a registration fee) and for with- 
drawing without academic penalty. After the refund deadline, prorated refunds 
will only be authorized by the Fee Appeals Committee for medical or unusual 
hardship cases. After the official withdrawal period, withdrawals without aca- 
demic penalty are granted only for unforeseeable, unavoidable and exceptional 
grounds. 

The student's record will show the date of withdrawal followed by a list of the 
registered courses marked with a "W", but academic grades and quality points 
are not recorded. Regular (degree candidate) undergraduate and unclassified 
students initiate the official withdrawal process with the Counseling Center, 200 
Harris Hall. Special (i.e., UGS and PBS lifelong education) students initiate their 
withdrawal process with the Division of Lifelong Education, McKimmon Center. 

For degree students, some colleges may require approval or notification of the 
Dean within the official withdrawal period. In cases of withdrawals granted for 
hardship reasons. Dean's approval, and in some cases, approval of the advisor 
and/or coordinator-of-advising is required. Cases of withdrawals granted for 
medical or emotional reason must be approved by the Counseling Center after 
evaluation of available documentation or special situation. 

Parential approval to withdraw may be required for single students who are 
under eighteen. Withdrawal during a semester does not constitute a break in 
residency if the student returns the semester immediately following. In cases 
where a student has obligations to the university for such matters as housing, 
board plan and financial aid, the withdrawal will not be processed by Registra- 
tion and Records until the student has officially cleared the obligations. It is 
highly recommended that students considering withdrawal consult their faculty 
advisor or departmental coordinator-of-advising before initiating the with- 
drawal process. 

READMISSION OF FORMER OR SUSPENDED DEGREE STUDENTS 

A Former Degree Student Returning is one who was not in attendance at all 
during the fall or spring semester prior to applying for readmission. All former 
degree students returning, both graduates and undergraduates, must apply for 
readmission to the Department of Registration and Records, North Carolina 
State University. Box 7313, Raleigh. North Carolina 27695-7313. Readmission 
applications should be submitted as soon as possible but no later than 30 days 
prior to the date of desired enrollment. Former students returning should be 
aware that enrollment restrictions may be imposed at any time which may affect 
their readmission. A student who received a bachelor's degree must (a) apply for 
admission to the Graduate School; or (b) apply for acceptance as a Post- 
Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) Student through the Division of Lifelong Educa- 
tion: or (c) apply for readmission as a candidate for a second bachelor's degree or 
for a professional degree or as an undergraduate Unclassified Student. Registra- 
tion alone is not sufficient to enable the student to be readmitted. 

58 



p 



Readmission of Former Degree Students 

Students who were eligible to continue at North Carolina State University at the 
time of their leaving are eligible to be readmitted to their former program 
provided they have a grade point average of 2.00 on all courses taken at NCSU 
and provided there is space available. 

Students who were eligible to continue at North Carolina State University at 
the time of their leaving and who have a grade point average of less than 2.00 on 
all courses taken at NCSU may be determined to be eligible for readmission 
through one of the following procedures: 

a. Students whose grade point average on all courses taken at NCSU is less 
than 2.00 but greater than that required for continuation under the next 
step in the graduated suspension policy are on Academic Warning I. Appli- 
cation for readmission from former students who are or would be on Aca- 
demic Warning I will be reviewed. 

b. Students whose grade point average on all courses taken at NCSU is less 
than that required for continuation under the next step in the graduated 
suspension policy but who are not suspended are on Academic Warning II. 
Applications for readmission from former students who are or would be on 
Academic Warning II will be reviewed. 

c. Former students whose grade point average on all courses taken at NCSU is 
such that they were or would have been suspensed will have their applica- 
tions for readmission reviewed by the University Admissions Committee. If 
readmitted, their academic status will be Academic Warning II. 

Former students whose hours attempted at NCSU plus transferred hours total 
160 or more will have their application for readmission reviewed in consultation 
with the appropriate college dean. If readmitted, they will be notified of any 
applicable conditions with regard to their making appropriate progress toward 
fulfillment of degree requirements. 

Readmission of Suspended Students. 

a. Automatic Readmission. Students who are academically suspended may do 
one one or both of the following: (1) attend any number of summer sessions at 
NCSU; (2) enroll in NCSU Independent Study by Extension courses (for- 
merly called correspondence courses) offered through the UNC Extension 
Division (Address: Independent Study by Extension, 101 Abernethy Hall, 
Campus Box 3420, UNC, Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599-3420, Phone: 
919-962-1106. 

NOTE: Only NCSU courses offered at NCSU summer sessions or NCSU 
courses that are a part of the Independent Study by Extension program may be 
used by suspended students to regain eligibility for automatic readmission. 
Courses taken at an institution other than NCSU or offered by some other 
institution through Independent Study by Extension do not affect a student's 
suspension status at NCSU. 

When by one or both of these methods a suspended student has improved 
his or her academic standing to the extent that the student is no longer 
academically suspended, that student becomes automatically eligible for 



59 



readmission to a regular semester and no letter of appeal to the University 
Admissions Committee by the student is necessary. 

I. Appeal to the University Admissions Committee. A student who is academi- 
cally suspended, who is ineligible for automatic readmission as described 
above, and who feels that extenuating circumstances contributed to that 
suspension, may appeal to the University Admissions Committee for read- 
mission to a regular semester. A letter must be written to the Committee 
stating: 

1. the reasons for former academic difficulty with an explanation of exte- 
nuating circumstances; 

2. why the student believes he or she can now successfully meet all degree 
requirements within a reasonable length of time; 

3. the summer sessions or Independent Study by Extension courses that 
have been completed; and 

4. the address and telephone number to be used for notification of the 
Admissions Committee's decision. 

NOTE: The Admissions Committee will not act on the appeal of any student 
currently enrolled in any Summer School or Independent Study by Exten- 
sion courses. Suspended students whose hours attempted at NCSU plus 
transferred hours are equal to or greater than 1 60 must be recommended by 
their deans for continuation or readmission before the Admissions Commit- 
tee urill review an appeal. 

The letter should be mailed to: Department of Registration and Records, 
Attention: Admissions Committee, North Carolina State University, Box 
7313, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7313. The letter must reach the Department of 
Registration and Records by the following deadlines: 

1. No later than 2 weeks before the first day of classes for the fall semester 
for students who did not attend summer school or who attended first 
summer session only; 

2. No later than 1 week before the first day of classes for the fall semester 
for students who attended second summer session. 

3. A^o later than 1 week before the first day of classes for the spring 
semester. 

NOTE: The Admissions Committee meets prior to the first day of classes. All 
material must be received in accordance with the above dates. 

c. Appeal to the University Admissions Committee by Students Who Have Not 
Been Enrolled at NCSU for Three or More Years. 

After not being enrolled at NCSU (excluding summer sessions and inde- 
pendent study) for a continuous three-year period or longer, a student 
whose former academic record at NCSU was such that he or she was 
suspended or would have been suspended or placed on Academic Warning 
II under current policies may petition the University Admissions Commit- 
tee for contractual readmission. 

The Committee will decide each case on its individual merits with special 
regard to the student's written appeal, the productive use of the three or 
more intervening years, evidence of motivation and achievement based on 



60 



I 



any academic work done during those three or more years, and a support- 
ing letter from the department offering the curriculum into which the 
student requests admission. This letter must contain a proposed plan of 
study agreed to and signed by the student, the department head, and the 
dean. If the curriculum into which the student requests admission is differ- 
ent from that in which the student was last enrolled, the petition to the 
Admissions Committee must also be accompanied by a Curriculum Change 
Form approved by the accepting dean. 

If a contractual readmission is approved, the following conditions will 
apply: 

1. The student's entire academic record at NCSU will be recorded on any 
subsequent transcript, including a GPA on all work attempted at 
NCSU; 

2. For courses attempted prior to readmission, only work of "C" or better 
will count toward fulfilling graduation requirements, providing that 
such courses meet current curriculum requirements; 

3. For purposes of suspension and graduation, a second GPA will be calcu- 
lated based only on courses that are attempted after readmission. Total 
hours for graduation and suspension will be based on all work at NCSU 
after readmission plus former work of C or better that is acceptable to 
the department plus hours transferred from other institutions. 

4. The student must maintain an overall GPA of 2.0 or better on all courses 
attempted after readmission. 

5. Students who fail to achieve an overall GPA of 2.0 required in #4 above 
will lose their contractual readmission status. Their status for subse- 
quent work as a degree student at NCSU shall be determined on the 
basis of total hours attempted at NCSU plus transferred hours, and 
their GPA calculated using all courses attempted at NCSU. 

6. A student may be readmitted under this option only once. 
Intra-Campus Transfers (curriculum change). 

A former student returning who desires a change of curriculum must have his 
or her records transferred to the new college and submit a properly validated 
Curriculum Change Form to the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 
Harris Hall, before readmission can be processed. 

TRANSFER CREDIT 

Transcripts of college course credit for new transfer students and for North 
Carolina State University students who have taken course work at another 
institution are evaluated by the dean of the appropriate school to determine how 
the work applies toward fulfilling the graduation requirements of each student's 
intended curriculum. 

Students admitted to an NCSU undergraduate degree program who wish to 
take courses at another institution must obtain prior endorsement from their 
academic department and prior written approval from their school dean in order 
to insure that the transfer credits will apply toward fulfilling specific graduation 
requirements. 



61 



Transfer credit is not recorded on former students' permanent records until 
after they have been readmitted and have reenrolled. 

REPEATING COURSES 

Students who repeat a course, regardless of the grade previously made, will 
have both grades counted in their cumulative Grade Point Average, except as 
indicated below. Undergraduate students may be allowed as many semester 
hours as are appropriate in the departmental curriculum for courses that: 1) are 
titled seminar, special problems, special topics, independent study or research 
(usually numbered 290-299, 490-499 or 590-599) and 2) cover topics different 
from those studied when the courses were previously taken. Unless a course 
satisfies one or the other of the above conditions, the semester hours will be 
counted only once toward the number of hours required for graduation even 
though students repeat and pass the course both times. 

The adviser's approval is required for students to repeat any course previously 
passed with a C or better. Such approval should not be given when students wish 
to repeat a course which they have already passed with a grade of A or B. Nor 
should it be given when: 1) students wish to repeat a lower division course that 
they have passed with a grade of C or better after having successfully completed 
an advanced course covering the same material, 2) students wish to repeat a 
lower level course that they have passed with a C or better which is a prerequisite 
for an advanced course that they had already successfully completed, (3) students 
wish to take an introductory course after they have successfully completed an 
advanced course dealing with similar material, or (4) students wish to repeat a 
course in which they have an outstanding grade of IN. 

Students must not register again for any courses in which they have IN grades. 
Such registration does not remove IN grades, and the completion of the course on 
the second occasion will automatically result in an NC for the incompleted course. 
For information, contact the Department of Registration and Records, 1000 
Harris, 737-2572. 

A student is eligible to repeat without penalty a maximum of three courses (but 
not more than 12 credit hours) at the 100- and/or 200-level provided all of the 
following criteria have been satisfied: (1) each course to be repeated was com- 
pleted for the first time in the 1984 fall semester or during any regular semester 
or summer session thereafter at NCSU, (2) the student received a grade of D or 
NC on each course to be repeated, and (3) the student completes each repeated 
course at NCSU no later than twelve months from the date on which he or she 
completed the course on the first enrollment or when the course is next offered, 
whichever is later. (4) The student can receive the benefits of this policy only once 
for each course repeated. 

To repeat a course without penalty under this policy means that an eligible 
student who completes for the second time a 100- or 200-level NCSU course may 
have the grade points and the credit hours attempted and earned on the first 
completion of the course removed from the calculation of his or her cumulative 
GPA. and from the calculation of the total hours attempted under the provisions 
of the suspension policy. The course title and grade on the first completion will 
continue to be shown on the official record. 

62 



CREDIT BY EXAMINATION 

Undergraduate students currently registered at NCSU (degree, unclassified, 
or special) may request an examination for course credit in a course whether 
enrolled in that course or not, under the conditions described below. Students 
must initiate a request with their adviser (except when a teaching department 
awards credit based upon group testing for placement purposes). Should the 
adviser approve, the student must arrange for the examination with the depart- 
ment offering the course. The department may administer the examination in 
any manner pertinent to the materials of the course. Departments are encour- 
aged to offer credit by examination in all courses but have the prerogative of 
excluding certain courses which are demonstrably unsuited for credit by 
examination. 

The academic standards for credit by examination will be commensurate with 
the academic standards for the course. If a student's performance on the exami- 
nation is judged to be of C or higher quality, the department will notify the 
Department of Registration and Records on a Grade Change Report that the 
student has received Credit by Examination for the course. The Department of 
Registration and Records will enter the appropriate number of credit hours on 
the student's permanent academic record. Credits earned through Credit by 
Examination are not used in the computation of a student's grade point average. 

The Department of Registration and Records will post course credit by exami- 
nation to a student's permanent academic record only if that student is currently 
registered at NCSU. However, if the course credit by examination would enable 
a student to complete the requirements for a degree, that student would not have 
to be registered in order to receive the credit. 

If a student fails to achieve C or higher quality work on an attempted credit by 
examination, no action is required other than the department's notifying the 
student. However, that student is not eligible for another such examination in the 
same course. 

Once a student has failed a course or has completed for credit or audited more 
than fifty percent of a course, the student may not attempt credit by examination 
for that course. Under unusual circumstances, exceptions may be made upon the 
written recommendation of the student's adviser and the approval of the depart- 
ment offering the course. A student who receives credit by examination in a 
course in which that student is currently enrolled must officially drop that course 
no later than mid-semester. 

CREDIT BY EXAMINATION THROUGH INDEPENDENT STUDY 

Persons who are not currently enrolled on campus and who have gained 
through study or experience, knowledge of the content of undergraduate credit 
courses offered through Independent Study may (with the approval of the Inde- 
pendent Study staff and the academic department offering a course) receive 
credit for that course by special examination. Students may request approval to 
attempt credit by examination by completing and submitting a form available 
from the Independent Study Office, 114 Abernethy Hall, Box 3420. UNC-CH, 
Chapel Hill, N.C. 27599-3420 (962-1106). 



63 



i 



Currently enrolled students are not eligible for credit by examination through 
Independent Study. These students should go directly to the appropriate aca- 
demic department to request credit by examination under the regular proce- 
dures in effect on campus. 

CREDIT-ONLY OPTION FOR FREE ELECTIVE COURSES 

Each undergraduate student has the option to count toward graduation 
requirements a maximum of 12 semester hours in the category of credit-only 
courses (exclusive of courses authorized to be graded on Satisfactory-Unsatis- 
factory basis). The student may select as credit-only any course offered by the 
university except those in Military Science and Aerospace Studies. Selected 
course must be included under the free elective category of the specified curricu- 
lum in which the student is enrolled. The student will be responsible for attend- 
ance, assignments, and examinations. 

The student's performance in a credit-only course will be reported as S (satis- 
factory grade for credit-only course and given when course work is equivalent to 
C or better) or U (no-credit grade for credit-only course). The grade for a credit- 
only course will have no effect on the student's Grade Point Average. The course 
and its grade will be counted in the cumulative hours attempted. Credit-only 
courses do not count in the calculation of eligibility for the Semester Dean's List, 
which requires either twelve hours or fifteen hours of course work for which grade 
points are earned. 

Lifelong Education Students may take on a credit-only basis any course for 
which they satisfy prerequisites. 

AUDITS (UNDERGRADUATE) 

Students wishing to audit a course before or after taking it for credit must have 
the approval of their adviser and of the department offering the course. Auditors 
are expected to attend class regularly. The degree to which an auditor must 
participate in class beyond regular attendance is optional with the instructor; 
any such requirements should be clearly explained in writing to the auditor at the 
beginning of the semester. Should the instructor conclude that poor attendance 
has resulted in an auditor's gaining little from the course, the instructor should 
mark NR (no recognition given for an audit) on the final grade report. Students 
who have taken a course for audit may, with their adviser's approval enroll in the 
course for credit during a subsequent semester or summer session. For tuition 
cost purposes, audits are treated as full credit value. For all other purposes, hours 
of audit do not count in calculating undergraduate course loads. 

NOTE: Veterans benefits are governed by Veterans Administration regulation 
concerning audits. Public Law 9Jt-502 (G.I. Bill) and Public Laiv 63 U (sons and 
daughters of deceased or disabled veterans) consider only courses being taken for 
credit when determining a student 's load for benefit purposes. See Veterans Affairs 
Office, Harris Hall. 



64 



INTRA-CAMPUS TRANSFERS 

Undergraduate students wishing to change from one curriculum to another 
must report to the dean's office of the college offering the curriculum in which 
entrance is desired and request acceptance into the new college or curriculum. 

A student who has attempted fewer than twelve credit hours at NCSU may 
transfer to another curriculum provided that student meets the admission 
requirements of the intended new curriculum. A student who has attempted twelve 
or more credit hours at NCSU may transfer to another curriculum provided that 
student is eligible to do so under the intra-campus transfer policy which pertains to 
the intended curriculum. 

If acceptance is approved, a Curriculum Change Form will be issued, bearing 
the signature of the accepting dean. If the former curriculum was in a different 
school, the Curriculum Change Form should be submitted for the signature of the 
releasing dean with the request that all records be transferred to the new college 
and department. From the standpoint of advising, registration, and adding and 
dropping courses, the student is considered to be in the new curriculum as soon as 
the Curriculum Change Form is completed and filed with the Department of 
Registration and Records and the records of the student have been transferred to 
the new department. 



Code of Conduct 



All students who enroll at North Carolina State University are required to 
adhere to the Student Body Code of Conduct. This code prescribes that University 
students must not lie, cheat, or steal nor exhibit behavior which does not reflect 
the standards of the Student Body. Students charged with and found guilty of 
committing such acts will be subject to disciplinary action. Sanctions include oral 
reprimand, written reprimand, in-kind restitution, restriction of privileges, dis- 
ciplinary probation, disciplinary eviction, interim suspension, suspension, and 
expulsion. 



Student Services 

ACCIDENT AND HEALTH INSURANCE 

The university offers a student accident and health insurance program. The 
insurance covers the surgical, accident, and hospital needs of the student as a 
supplement to the Student Health Service. Each year complete information will 
be made available to students before school opens. 

Health Educators offers a variety of information, programs and services to 
students. Health topics include weight-control, alcohol and drug education, 
stress management, first aid, sexually transmitted diseases, women's issues and 
more. 

65 



CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT CENTER 

The Center offers assistance to all students at the university on a year round 
basis. Advice on the relationship of professional goals to various programs of 
study and assistance in identifying individual aptitudes and abilities affecting 
career potential are available. Students are encouraged to participate in a Career 
Planning Workshop in the freshman or sophomore year. 

The center coordinates job interviews between students and employer repre- 
sentatives. Seniors are urged to use this placement service for interviewing with 
potential employers. The staff also recommends contacts with employers not 
scheduled to visit the campus. 

COUNSELING 

The Counseling Center assists individuals in gaining a better understanding of 
themselves. Psychologists, professional counselors, and psychiatrists are availa- 
ble to work with students who desire assistance with concerns such as: choosing a 
career; academic planning; identifying and overcoming educational difficulties; 
developing greater self-understanding; developing more satisfying personal 
relations; and coping with stress or emotional crisis. All counseling is strictly 
confidential. 

In addition to one-to-one and group counseling for individuals and couples, 
workshops are offered throughout the year in a variety of areas, including 
vocational exploration, study skills, anxiety-reduction, and assertive behavior. 

Counseling services are available without cost to all enrolled NCSU students, 
and some services are available to prospective students. Appointments may be 
scheduled over the telephone by calling 737-2424 or in person by coming to 200 
Harris Hall. (Evening appointments are available.) 

FOOD SERVICE 

Meal Plans. University Dining's meal plans offer students flexibility and 
convenience. The four meal plan choices are: the Gold Card, 20-meal plan, any-15 
meal plan, and 15-meal plan M-F. Participation in the meal plan program is 
required for all freshmen living on campus. Students other than freshmen may 
participate as space permits. 

Dining Services. University Dining operates 15 locations across campus offer- 
ing a wide variety of food choices. The Dining Hall serves as the main hub for the 
meal-plan programs and offers an all-you-can-eat menu. Also located on campus 
are convenience stores, ice cream parlors, a deli, cafeteria-type areas, the cater- 
ing division, and the Special Edition steakhouse. A debit card program, the 
AllCampus Money Card, provides the opportunity to eat in all areas of the 
campus without carrying cash. 

HANDICAPPED STUDENTS 

Students requiring special assistance because of visual, hearing, learning or 
motor handicaps should contact Handicapped Student Services, NCSU, Box 



66 



7312. Raleigh. NC 27695-7312 (200 Harris Hall). 737-7653. Interpreter, tutorial, 
notetaker and/or reader services are available by contacting the center. 

Direct services for all learning disabled students, such as assessment, educa- 
tional counseling, and arrangements for appropriate academic support can also 
be initiated by the Handicapped Student Services. 

Those students needing special assistance in scheduling courses should make 
contact as far as possible in advance of preregistration deadlines. 

HEALTH 

The university seeks to safeguard the health of the students in every way 
possible. The Student Health Service, located in Clark Hall Infirmary, offers 
medical care to students on an outpatient and inpatient basis. The facility is 
staffed by full-time physicians, registered nurses and other medical support 
personnel. 

During most of the fall and spring semesters, the Health Service is open 24 
hours a day. seven days a week. Only an outpatient clinic is operated during the 
summer session, some student holidays, and semester breaks. Physicians main- 
tain regular office hours Monday through Friday and are on call at all times to 
assist the nurses on duty when a patient's condition warrants immediate 
attention. 

All registered students pay a medical fee which covers both inpatient and 
outpatient professional services; i.e., visits to nurse or M.D.. routine laboratory 
procedures and some medications available in the student pharmacy. There is a 
nominal charge for x-rays, some lab tests, allergy injections, some medications 
and special clinics. Students are responsible for the cost of laboratory tests and 
x-rays which must be performed by an off-campus agency, medications not 
available in the student pharmacy, and expenses incurred when referred to an 
off-campus M.D. or hospital. 

All health and medical information is confidential and is not divulged to 
anyone without the written consent of the patient. 

LAUNDRY AND DRY CLEANING 

The University operates a laundry and dry cleaning facility on campus at 
reasonable prices. Branch offices are located in the residence halls for the conven- 
ience of the students. 

LINEN RENTAL PROGRAM 

The NCSU Laundry offers a special linen rental package to incoming students. 
The Laundry will provide two sheets, three towels, and a crisp pillow case each 
week. New standard size pillows are also available. 

Linen Rooms are located in Becton, Bowen. Lee. Owen, Syme, and at the main 
Laundry on Yarborough Drive. Throughout the school year, the Linen Rooms in 
the residence halls are open five days a week to accommodate your needs for clean 
linen. 



67 



CLOTHESLINE PROGRAM 

The NCSU Laundry and Dry Cleaners also offers the CLOTHESLINE Pro- 
gram which provides wash/dry & fold service for 135 pounds of laundry, wash 
and press service for 75 shirts or blouses, and dry cleaning of 15 items per 
semester. It is a convenient way to keep clothes clean and neat, and payment is 
only required once (at the beginning of the school year.) 

In addition to bringing laundry to the main facility on Yarborough Drive. 
CLOTHESLINE members may drop off and pick up laundry and cleaning atone 
of the linen rooms located in the residence halls mentioned above. 

NCSU BOOKSTORES 

The official campus source for all course-books is NCSU Bookstores, consisting 
of the main store, located on East Dunn Avenue, and the North Campus Shop, 
located in the lower level of Erdahl-Cloyd Annex of the D. H. Hill Library. At the 
main store, the book division provides textbooks, fiction, non-fiction, technical 
and reference titles, publishers' overstock and remainders, college outlines, 
paperbacks, book reviews, periodicals and calendars. The merchandise division 
carries school supplies, personal computers with accessories and supplies, art 
and engineering supplies, greeting cards, health and beauty aids, imprinted 
sportswear, souvenirs, and convenience items. Special orders are accepted for 
books and merchandise. Purchases may be charged by VISA, MasterCard, or 
AllCampus Money Card. During the opening of fall and spring semesters, the 
main store is open specified evenings, in addition to each Tuesday evening and 
Saturday when classes are in session. North Campus Shop specializes in compu- 
ter supplies, sale books, magazines, college outlines, greeting cards, souvenirs, 
gifts, and convenience items. The entire operation of NCSU Bookstores is com- 
pletely self-supporting, with its annual surplus transferred to NCSU Scholar- 
ship Fund. 

TRANSPORTATION 

There are very few parking spaces for the number of people with on campus 
parking needs; therefore, students are encouraged to use transportation other 
than personal automobiles. There are various alternatives that may be chosen 
such as motorcycles, mopeds, bicycles, and carpools. Each alternative is both 
economical and convenient. 

Students living off campus in nearby apartment complexes may elect to use 
Wolfline, the University's special transit service. The Capitol Area Transit Ser- 
vice (CAT) is available for students living throughout Raleigh. 

Any student parking a car on campus is required to have a permit. Freshman 
residents and off-campus students living within a one mile radius of campus are 
not eligible for campus parking permits. Continuing students are encouraged to 
register for the appropriate parking permit during the Permit Pre-registration 
Program offered each spring. Any person who brings a vehicle on campus is 
responsible for compliance with campus Parking and Traffic Rules and 
Regulations. 



68 



For more information on parking and transportation, please contact the Divi- 
sion of Transportation, NCSU Campus. Box 7221, Raleigh, North Carolina, 
27695-7221, (919) 737-3424. 



Student Activities 



The University makes every effort to provide surroundings which are pleasant 
and conducive to intellectual growth. In addition, a wide variety of athletic, 
cultural, and social opportunities are available to students. Through the services 
and activities affiliated with campus life, as well as through extra-curricular 
organizations and functions, the student at N.C. State may acquire experience in 
group leadership and community living to supplement and enrich the academic 
component of his/her education. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

Every NCSU student is a member of a community which exercises executive, 
legislative, and judicial authority in matters of student affairs. Students have a 
voice in government through participation in campus-wide elections of officers, 
legislators, and judiciary members. 

CLUBS AND SOCIETIES 

Honorary. University-wide honorary societies include Golden Chain, senior 
leadership; Thirty and Three, junior leadership; Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha 
Lambda Delta, freshman scholarship; Gamma Beta Phi, scholarship and service; 
and Phi Kappa Phi, junior, senior, and graduate student scholarship. 

Professional and Technical Organizations. The colleges and departments of 
the university sponsor or supervise a large number of professional and technical 
societies and clubs. These organizations contribute substantially to students' 
professional and social growth. 

Fraternities and Sororities. Twenty-five national general college fraternities 
have chapters at State. They are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Phi Alpha, Delta Chi, 
Delta Sigma Phi, Delta Upsilon, FarmHouse, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Alpha Psi, 
Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, Phi Delta 
Theta, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, 
Sigma Alpha Mu, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Sigma Pi, Tau 
Kappa Epsilon, Theta Chi, and Theta Tau. 

State has eight national general college sororities. They are Alpha Delta Pi, 
Alpha Kappa Alpha, Chi Omega, Delta Sigma Theta, Sigma Gamma Rho, Sigma 
Kappa, Zeta Phi Beta, and Zeta Tau Alpha. 

Other Organizations. There are over 250 other student organizations, most of 
which are open to all interested students. 



69 



STUDENT MEDIA 

North Carolina State students have the opportunity to edit and manage a 
variety of student-oriented media. By working with these media a student may 
gain valuable extra-curricular experience in journalism, broadcasting, produc- 
tion and design, leadership, and management. 

There are four media supported in large part by a designated portion of each 
student's non-academic fees and staffed by students. 

The Agromeck, the University yearbook, provides a record in words and 
pictures of student and campus activities during the past year. 

The Technician, the student newspaper, is published three mornings a week. 

The Windhover.the campus literary magazine, is published each spring. 

WKNC (88.1-FM), the student radio station, operates at 3000 watts, enabling 
it to be heard within a 42-mile radius of Raleigh. The station operates 24 hours a 
day with a full staff of engineers, disc jockeys, and news personnel. 

Several of the colleges have their own publications dealing with material of 
special interest to students in these areas. The publications include Agri-Life, 
Agriculture and Life Sciences; the Pi-Ne-Tum, Forest Resources; The Southern 
Engineer, Engineering; The Textile Forum, Textiles; The Publications of the 
School ofDesiffn: and The Scientist, Physical and Mathematical Sciences. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

Since the early days of North Carolina State, musical organizations have 
played an important part in campus life presenting concerts, furnishing music 
for official university functions and performing at athletic events. The combined 
membership of these organizations constitutes the largest voluntary student 
organization on campus. Students may join the bands, choral organizations, 
orchestras, and pipes and drums by reporting for an audition at the time and 
location indicated in the orientation schedule. Rehearsals are arranged to avoid 
conflicts with other classes or with study time. Membership in all musical organ- 
izations is open to any regularly enrolled student. 

Bands. The Symphonic Band, the Fanfare Band, the British Brass Band and 
the Marching Band make up the four divisions of the N. C. State bands. Each 
band serves a specific purpose and assignments are made according to individual 
interests and abilities. The Symphonic, Fanfare and Brass Bands are concert 
organizations. The Marching Band is active only during football season. 

Choral Groups. The Varsity Men's Glee Club, the University Choir, the 
Chamber Music Singers and the New Horizons Choir make up the four choral 
divisions. Placement in an organization is made according to the student's abili- 
ties and interest. These groups present concerts each year, both on and off 
campus, as well as making radio and television appearances, recordings, tours 
and providing small ensembles for special occasions. 

Orchestras. Members of the Raleigh Civic Symphony and the University- 
Civic Concert Orchestra include NCSU students and faculty, students and 
faculty from area colleges and universities, and community members. Placement 
is made according to individual ability and interest. A wide range of orchestral 
music is read and performed, with concerts given on and off campus. Provisions 



70 






are made for those with an interest in string quartet and other small ensemble 
experience. An Intermediate String Class is available for those who desire to 
improve their technical skills and who seek further playing experience before 
performing with one of the orchestras. 

NCS Pipes and Drums. Students may learn to play the bagpipes, an instru- 
ment known to many of North Carolina's early settlers, and represent the univer- 
sity through this unique and distinctive medium. The NCS Pipes and Drums 
performs several times throughout the year at University and community func- 
tions. Pipes, drums, and equipment are furnished. 

Artist-in-Residence. North Carolina State University established this special 
chair in the Music Department to facilitate the university's cultural develop- 
ment. Performing musicians are appointed to this position on a rotating basis. 
They are available to all university classes and organizations for concerts and 
presentations. 

UNIVERSITY STUDENT CENTER 

The University Student Center provides a focal point for much of the extra- 
curricular life on campus featuring lounge areas, vending areas, a game room, 
dining facilities, meeting rooms and much more. 

The majority of the activity in the student center focus on the arts. Stewart 
Theatre presents an extensive professional performing arts season of music, 
dance, theatre, comedy and more during the Center Stage season. Students may 
attend performances by some of the world's greatest actors at reduced rates. 
Lectures, films, debates and other special events are also held in the 816-seat 
facility. 

The Visual Arts Programs Office maintains the University's permanent art 
collection. Many exhibitions and special educational programs are presented in 
the center each year. 

The University Student Center is guided by the student officers of the Union 
Activities Board, committee chairmen and a student-faculty board of directors. 
Student committees are involved in all of the arts areas in addition to committees 
on lectures, films, game tournaments, black cultural programs, international 
student programs, coffee houses, dances and more. 

The center also houses the student newspaper offices, the yearbook office, radio 
station. Student Government offices, the International Student Office, the Inter- 
Fraternity Council office, and space for religious workers, volunteer services, 
and the Student Leadership Center. 

Other cultural programs and opportunities provided by branches of the Stu- 
dent Center include: Thompson Theatre, where students participate in acting, 
producing, and writing their own theatre productions; Price Music Center, 
where students participate in a wide range of choral and instrumental groups; 
and the Craft Center, where students receive instruction in a broad range of 
crafts. 



71 



THOMPSON THEATRE 

Thompson Theatre is a student oriented theatre with an emphasis on flexibility 
and experimentation. Each production is open to all NCSU students, whether 
experienced or not, as actors, technicians, crew members and directors. 

Major productions are directed and produced by the professional theatre staff. 
Experimental studio theatre productions are completely produced by students 
under the guidance and supervision of the professional staff. There are also black 
theatre and children's theatre productions. 

Thompson Theatre works closely with the Department of Communication 
which offers several courses for those interested in theatre. 

The University Players is the student organization within the theatre which 
recommends theatre operating policies and helps to determine the theatre's 
program. 

STEWART THEATRE 

Stewart Theatre, located in the University Student Center, offers an opportun- 
ity for students and other members of the university community to see and hear 
the best in professional performances: plays, jazz, pops, folk and chamber music 
concerts, both modern dance and ballet, films and lectures. Special rates are 
available to NCSU students. 

CRAFTS CENTER 

Located on the ground floor of the Thompson building is one of the finest crafts 
facilities on any southeastern university campus. Instruction is offered in ceram- 
ics, woodworking, photography, textile design, weaving and a host of other 
crafts. The facilities are also available for independent work. The Crafts Center is 
open year-round. Supplies for most crafts can be purchased at the center. 

LEADERSHIP TRAINING 

The Student Leadership Center, sponsored by the University Student Cen- 
ter, offers a variety of programs such as the Leadership Development Series and 
the Role Model Leader's Forum that are designed to give all NCSU students the 
opportunity to explore the nature of leadership and to develop their own leader- 
ship potential and skills in living. The Leadership Development Series consists of 
approximately 50 non-credit three-hour modules that focus on different aspects 
of leadership. These modules are normally offered on Monday and Tuesday 
evenings and at least once each semester. Further information may be obtained 
from 3111 University Student Center (737-2452). 

A Leader's Reaction Course is maintained and operated by the Military 
Science Department. This course is designed to provide practical experience in 
problem-solving, decision-making, and directing the activities of small groups. 
The course is available to all student organizations and activities officially recog- 
nized by the university. Its use must be coordinated through the Professor of 
Military Science. 



72 



The Pershing Rifles is a student organization open to all students at North 
Carolina State University. Members of the Pershing Rifles participate in drill 
and ceremony activities to include the colorguard at home football and basketball 
games. Additionally, they participate in parades in the local area and regional 
drill meets. The Pershing Rifles is sponsored by the Army ROTC, though partici- 
pants are not required to be enrolled in the ROTC program. 

The Ranger Challenge Team is a cadet organization open to members of the 
Wolfpack Battalion. Members of the Ranger Challenge Team participate in 
many physically and mentally demanding activities throughout the school year, 
including tactical exercises, rope bridging, road marching, land navigation, 
helicopter flights, and competitions. The Ranger Challenge Team is sponsored by 
Army ROTC. 

INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

The Department of Athletics conducts the university's intercollegiate athletics 
program involving 12 varsity sports for men, and 10 for women and one co-ed. 

The athletics program is administered by the Athletics Director with the 
Athletics Council, made up of eleven faculty, three alumni, two members of 
student government, two student athletes, and one coach, serving in an advisory 
capacity to the Athletics Director and Chancellor. The program is self- 
supporting and is operated through gate receipts, radio and television revenues, 
and student fees. Funds for athletics grants-in-aid are provided through the 
North Carolina State Student Aid Association (Wolfpack Club). Grants-in-aid 
are based upon the recommendation of the coach of each sport and approved by 
the Athletics Director and awarded by the university's Financial Aid Office. 

Men's varsity sports include soccer, cross country, and football in the fall; 
basketball, swimming, fencing, indoor track, and wrestling in the winter; and 
track, golf, tennis, and baseball in the spring. Varsity sports for women are 
soccer, cross country, and volleyball in the fall; basketball, indoor track, swim- 
ming, fencing, and gymnastics in the winter; and track, and tennis in the spring. 
During the winter the co-ed rifle team competes. 

The university facilities include Carter-Finley Stadium (45,600 seats); Reyn- 
olds Coliseum (12,000 seats for basketball); Doak Field (3,800 seats for baseball); 
the Paul H. Derr Track Stadium (3,000 seats), with a nine-lane tartan track; a 
2,200 seat swimming stadium, with a 25-yard by 25-meter pool and a 50-meter 
training and competition pool; a soccer field (5,000 seats); and a 12-court all- 
weather tennis complex. In addition, the Wolfpack athletics administrative of- 
fices, women's intercollegiate coaches offices, several men's sports coaches offi- 
ces, and an athletics dining hall are housed in the Case Athletics Center. The 
Weisiger-Brown General Athletics Facility houses the football, track and wres- 
tling coaches' offices, a weight room, a wrestling room, a training room, an 
equipment room, and dressing rooms for football, wrestling, and track. Reynolds 
Coliseum has a weight room, training room, and locker and dressing facilities for 
the women's sports and dressing rooms for the men's sports of basketball, base- 
ball, soccer, and tennis. 



73 



INTRAMURAL-RECREATIONAL SPORTS 

North Carolina State University maintains an extensive program of intra- 
mural-recreational sports administered by the Department of Physical Educa- 
tion. This program is divided into the areas of intramural sports, club sports, 
informal recreation, extramural sports, and special events. The intramural 
sports program is available to all students, faculty, and staff. 

Twenty-three individual and team sports are offered and participants may join 
through different divisions; i.e., residence, sororities, fraternities, open and co- 
recreational. The sports available are: Badminton, Basketball (2-Player, 3- 
Player, 5-Player, Dixie Classic, and Faculty), Bowling, Cross Country, Flag 
Football, Golf, Handball, Pitch & Putt, Racquetball, Soccer, Softball, Squash, 
Swimming, Table Tennis, Tennis, Track & Field, Tri-Challenge Football, and 
Volleyball. 

Club sports programs are available to those interested in specialized activities 
that provide opportunities for instructional experiences, a higher level of compe- 
tition, or recreational and social benefits. At present, the active clubs recognized 
are: Aerobics, Archery, Badminton, Baseball, Bowling, Country & Western 
Dance, Cycling, Frisbee, Ice Hockey, Judo, Lacrosse (Men), Lacrosse (Women), 
Outing, Racquetball, Rowing, Rodeo, Rugby, Sailing, Snow Ski, Soccer (Men), 
Soccer (Women), Sports Officials, Squash, Tae Kwon Do, Tennis, Volleyball, 
Water Aerobics, Water Polo, Water Ski, Wind Surfing, and Wrestling. 

"Big Four Sports Day" is an extramural event for men and women represent- 
ing North Carolina State, UNC-Chapel Hill, Duke, and Wake Forest. The compe- 
tition includes the sports of badminton, basketball, bowling, cross country, golf, 
racquetball, softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis, and volleyball. 

The Intramural-Recreational Sports Program is comprehensive in scope and 
committed to meeting the sports and physical activity needs of the students, 
faculty, and staff at North Carolina State University. 




COLLEGES, DEPARTMENTS, 
AND PROGRAMS OF STUDY 



Undergraduate programs of study are offered by the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences, the School of Design, the College of Education and Psychology, 
the College of Engineering, the College of Forest Resources, the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences, the College of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences, and the College of Textiles. 

GENERAL EDUCATION DISTRIBUTION REQUIREMENTS 

A university education should prepare students for a full life in their profes- 
sions and occupations by means of curricula that provide both practical founda- 
tions for future careers and such intangibles as intellectual flexibility, broad 
knowledge, and a basic comprehension of human achievements. To accomplish 
these ends, all baccalaureate programs at NCSU include the following general 
education requirements: 
English Composition — Satisfactory completion of ENG 111 and ENG 112. 
Mathematics — Six credit hours of mathematics and/or work in the closely 
related fields of statistics, computer science, and logic. At least one of these 
courses must be a course in mathematics. 

Humanities and Social Sciences — Eighteen credit hours not including ENG 
111 and ENG 112. Within the minimum of eighteen credit hours, at least six 
credit hours must be in the humanities and at least six credit hours must be in 
the social sciences. A list of courses appropriate for use as humanities courses 
and a list of courses appropriate for use as social science courses are issued 
periodically by the Provost's Office. Courses not on the list may not be used to 
fulfill humanities or social science requirements in any curriculum. Colleges 
and departments may specify groups of courses or specific individual courses 
from the list to be used by their students in fulfilling the humanities and social 
science requirements in their curricula. 

Natural Sciences— Eight credit hours, including at least one basic course 
from the biological, earth, or physical sciences. 

Free Electives— All curricula must include at least nine credit hours of free 
electives. No other limitations should be imposed upon the student's choice of 
these electives, provided the student has satisfied the prerequisites and pro- 
vided that no elected course should cover material that is considered remedial, 
that covers material at an elementary level after the student has taken com- 
parable material at an advanced level, or that covers material substantially 
presented in a course previously taken. Students are encouraged to use their 
free electives to explore fields of study different from those required in their 
curriculum. Free electives may be taken on a credit-only basis up to a maxi- 
mum of 12 credit hours. Types of courses that are frequently selected as free 
electives include environmental awareness courses, fine arts, introductions to a 
discipline or technology designed for non-majors, additional humanities and 

75 



social sciences, and courses that are part of a minor, a second major, or a dual 
degree. Any elective in a curriculum is interpreted as a free elective unless 
qualifications are specifically listed. 

Physical Education— Four credit hours of physical education (PE 100 and 
three credit hours of activity courses). Required physical education courses 
may be taken on a credit-only basis. Students with appropriate skills, expe- 
rience, and knowledge may satisfy three of the four required physical educa- 
tion credits ( PE 100 not included) through credit by examination. All students 
who do not pass the survival swimming test taken during PE 100 will be 
expected to take PE 112 (Beginning Swimming) unless exempted. 
The full requirements for completion of each undergraduate program of study 
at NCSU reflect the general education distribution requirements described 
above, additional college requirements, and departmental requirements particu- 
lar to a given major or degree program. Throughout this section the degree 
requirements are frequently shown as particular courses or categories of courses. 
The course prefix abbreviations (e.g., ANS, CSC, HI, and PSY) provide a key 
for locating the basic information for individual courses in the Course Descrip- 
tion section of this catalog. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

Students are eligible for graduation when they have completed satisfactorily 
all the academic requirements of their degree program as specified by their 
major department, their college, and the university. 

NCSU requires that, in addition to other university, college, and departmental 
requirements, all students must have a grade point average of at least 2.0, based 
on all courses attempted at NCSU, in order to be eligible to receive a baccalau- 
reate degree. 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation — These are shown for each cur- 
riculum and range from 124 to 141. Curricula in the high range normally are 
those involving a required summer camp or field experience. Many students take 
more hours than the required minimum. 

Length of Time to Graduation— Many factors influence the length of time 
that it takes students to graduate. Undergraduate students frequently take more 
than eight semesters to complete an undergraduate program at NCSU and at 
most universities in the United States. This usually occurs as a result of one or 
more of the following factors: ( 1 ) part-time enrollment, (2) reduced class loads for 
health, part-time employment, or other reasons, (3) one or more changes of 
curriculum, (4) participation in cooperative education programs, (5) participa- 
tion in study abroad programs, (6) incomplete or inadequate secondary school 
background requiring some additional compensatory, developmental, or pre- 
requisite courses, or (7) poor academic performance in the freshman year or early 
semesters. Some factors that may accelerate progress towards graduation 
include (1) advanced placement for introductory courses, (2) enrollment in 
summer sessions, and (3) good academic performance in freshman and basic 
prerequisite courses. 

The University discourages students from taking heavy and unrealistic course 
loads as a means to accelerate their progress towards graduation since this may 

76 



result in poor academic performance.- Some colleges and schools have established 
maximum course load limitations for first-semester or first-year students 
depending upon their academic performance projections. 

Semester-by-Semester Displays — The requirements for many curricula 
throughout this section are set forth in semester-by-semester displays. One pur- 
pose for these displays is to illustrate how certain sequences of courses and 
prerequisites may be scheduled. Another purpose is to reflect whether courses 
are normally offered in the fall or the spring semester. Otherwise, the semester- 
by-semester displays are merely advisory and not mandatory. The typical semes- 
ter schedule shown in the displays may not be the appropriate one for many 
students. Students are required to consult with their faculty advisers prior to 
registration each semester. 

Limited D Grades— Some colleges and departments have established limita- 
tions on the use of D grades in certain courses or categories of courses for 
satisfying graduation requirements. 

Grade Point Average in Major — Some departments have established gradua- 
tion requirements of a grade point average of 2.0 on all courses attempted in the 
major at NCSU in addition to the university grade point average requirement of 
a 2.0 for all courses attempted at NCSU. These include the following depart- 
ments: Chemistry; Economics and Business; History; Sociology, Anthropology 
and Social Work; and all departments in the College of Engineering. 

Residence Requirements— To be eligible for a bachelor's degree, a student 
must be enrolled in a degree program and must have earned at least 30 of his or 
her last 45 hours of credit through NCSU courses. Individual departments 
and/or colleges may have additional residence requirements. 
NOTE: The College of Engineering has a policy that transfer students normally 
must earn at least U8 of their last 60 hours of credit at NCSU while enrolled as 
degree candidates. 

MINORS 

Some departments at NCSU offer undergraduate minors for students wishing 
a systematic program of study in an area outside their major. All minors require 
at least 15 credit hours and may be either departmental or interdepartmental. 
Courses within the minor program may be used to satisfy any of the general 
requirements, including free electives, of a major curriculum. Minors are com- 
pletely optional, the only requirement being that a student may not minor in the 
same discipline as their major. Students pursuing a minor must consult with a 
minor advisor on a plan of work and must file a copy of this plan with their major 
advisor at least one semester before graduation. Satisfactory completion of the 
minor will be noted on the final transcript following graduation. 

TWO DEGREES 

Students who have satisfactorily completed the requirements for more than 
one bachelor's degree may. upon the recommendation of their deans, be awarded 
two bachelor's degrees at the same or at different commencement exercises. To 
earn two degrees students register in one school or department and, with the 



77 



cooperation of the second school or department, work out their program to cover 
the requirements for both. Students must file an approved Double Majors Only 
Curriculum Change Form with Registration and Records, 1000 Harris Hall. An 
Application for Degree Form must be submitted for each degree. 

TRANSCRIPTS OF ACADEMIC RECORD 

A transcript is an exact copy of a student's permanent academic record at the 
time it is issued. A fee of two dollars is charged for each transcript. 

No official transcript may be issued to or for a student who rs indebted to the 
university until such indebtedness has been paid or satisfactorily adjusted. 

Official transcripts are issued only upon the written request of the student to 
Registration and Records, Box 7313, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7313. 




COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND 
LIFE SCIENCES 



Patterson Hall (Room 115) 

D. F. Bateman, Dean 

J. L. Oblinger, Associate Dean and Director of Academic Affairs 

J. F. Ort, Assistant Director of Academic Affairs and Director of Agricudtural Institute 

W. C. Grant, Assistant Director of Academic Affairs 

M. W. Moore, Academic and Career Advisor 

The academic programs in the college represent a unique blending of the agricultural 
and life sciences. Agriculture is a very diverse industry that touches everyone's life in some 
way or another. The continuum is founded on the principles of science, technology, and 
business. The life sciences provide foundations for studying medical and health-related 
disciplines as v ell as environmental sciences and molecular biology. 

The overall goals of the instructional program in the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences include providing relevant, scientific, and practical knowledge of the food, agri- 
cultural, and life sciences to its students. These programs emanate from a highly qualified 
and accomplished faculty committed to academic excellence and the development of the 
individual to his or her personal and professional potential. Central to the college's goals is 
the cultivation of interdisciplinary problem-solving skills which will serve its graduates 
well as they pursue a lifetime of learning and adaptation to change. 

The objectives of the academic program are as follows: 

1) To provide an opportunity for a broad university education 

2) To provide a variety of learning experiences 

3) To offer a choice of specialization in agriculture and life sciences 

4) To provide background for graduate or professional programs 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Students in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have ample opportunities to take 
part in broadening extracurricular activities. Most departments have student organiza- 
tions that provide professional as well as social experience. Representatives of these clubs 
form the Agri-Life Council. This council is the student organization representing the 
college. Student tours provide an opportunity to see firsthand the application of classroom 
principles. In addition, students representing agrimarketing, agronomy, animal science, 
horticultural science, food science, poultry science and soil science compete regionally and 
nationally in a number of activities providing student members a chance to learn by travel 
as well as by participation. 

CURRICULUM OFFERINGS AND REQUIREMENTS 

A freshman enrolling in Agriculture and Life Sciences has common core courses the first 
year — courses appropriate in all curricula. This approach allows the student time to 
explore various programs before selecting a curriculum. The student selects a major in a 
department, interdisciplinary program, or individualized course plan. All departments 
offer science curricula (intended primarily for students who anticipate attending graduate 
or professional school); several technology curricula; and the Agricultural Business Man- 
agement curriculum is offered in the Department of Agricultural and Resource 
Economics. 



79 



Departmental majors are offered as follows: 

Science— agricultural economics, animal science, applied sociology, biochemistry, bio- 
logical and agricultural engineering (joint program with the College of Engineering), 
botany, fisheries and wildlife sciences (joint program with College of Forest Resources), 
food science, horticultural science, medical technology, microbiology, poultry science, and 
zoolog>'. Preprofessional courses are offered in the science curriculum track. 

Technology— agricultural systems technology, animal science, food science, horticul- 
tural science and poultry science. 

Business— agricultural business management is offered through the Department of 
Agricultural and Resource Economics. A concentration in biological sciences and the 
opportunity for double majoring in business and other programs are available. 

Interdepartmental and Interdisciplinary Programs— These curricula offer the opportun- 
ity to select broad curriculum majors that involve two or more departments or colleges: 

Agronomy— A technical curriculum dealing with the fundamentals of crop production 
and soil management. The curriculum is administered by the Departments of Crop Science 
and Soil Science. 

Biological Sciences— A curriculum with emphasis on biological and physical sciences, 
especially designed for graduate or professional courses requiring a biology background. 

Conservation— A curriculum concentrating on the use, management and improvement 
of natural resources. The curriculum is administered jointly by the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences and the College of Forest Resources. 

Individualized Study Program— A curriculum planned by the student with the assist- 
ance of a faculty advisory committee. 

In addition to these cited curricula, a number of arrangements are available that provide 
the student an opportunity to select areas of course concentration. 

ACADEMIC MINORS 

Several departments in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences offer a minor in 
their discipline. Students interested in additional information regarding a minor should 
contact the appropriate departmental office. At present, the following minors are 
available: 

Agricultural Business Management Genetics 

Agricultural Economics Horticultural Science 

Animal Science Nutrition 

Applied Sociology Soil Science 

Botany Zoology 

Food Science 

HONORS PROGRAM 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences has a comprehensive honors program for 
qualified students throughout their academic career. Both seminar discussion programs 
covering broad topics and an independent research program are included. Faculty provide 
direction on an individual basis to each student with the student selecting his or her project. 

Participation in CALS Honors Program is limited to CALS students with a GPA of 3.25 
or above. The following ALS courses, 299H, 498H. 499H, are required. In addition, a 
student must take at least six hours of honors coursework (at least 3 credits outside CALS) 
or participate in the University Scholars Program for at least two semesters. Honors 
coursework must be completed with a "C" or better. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

Students in all majors with strong academic records are recognized by national organiza- 
tions that have local chapters, Gamma Sigma Delta, Alpha Zeta, Alpha Epsilon Delta and 
Phi Kappa Phi. 



80 



SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM 

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences awards approximately 250 scholarships 
each year on a combination of selection factors including merit, financial need and 
leadership. 

JEFFERSON SCHOLARS IN AGRICULTURE AND THE HUMANITIES 

(See also College of Humanities and Social Sciences) 

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program in Agriculture and the Humanities is a joint 
program of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. It is a double degree program which permits participants to have two 
concentrations: one in an area of agriculture, such as agronomy, animal science, food 
science, or horticulture, and one in an area of humanities/social sciences, such as business 
management, public policy, international studies or general humanities. The double degree 
program may be individually designed to meet each student's particular interests and 
career goals. The purpose of the program is to produce potential leaders in agriculture who 
have not only technical expertise but also an appreciation for the social, political, and 
cultural issues that effect decision-making. 

Each spring a number of entering freshmen are chosen to receive scholarships to partici- 
pate in the Jefferson program. In addition, other qualified students may choose to pursue a 
double major in agriculture and the humanities under the Jefferson program. 

Students interested in applying to the Jefferson Scholars program should contact: Office 
of the Dean, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Box 8101, North Carolina State 
University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8101, or the Office of the Associate Dean, College of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences, Box 7642, before January 15. 

For more information, contact the program coordinator, Martha W. Moore, (111 Patter- 
son Hall, 737-3249) or Lynda Hambourger, Assistant to the Dean, Humanities and Social 
Sciences (106 Caldwell Hall, 737-2467). 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

An international seminar is offered to interested students. In addition, an international 
option, requiring a modern foreign language and 12 semester hours of appropriate courses 
in the social sciences, is available for students enrolled in any curricula. 

DEGREES 

The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred upon the satisfactory completion of one of the 
curricula in this college. 

The degrees of Master of Science, Master of Agriculture and Master of Life Sciences are 
offered in the various departments in the college. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered in the following subject areas: animal science, 
biochemistry, biological and agricultural engineering, botany, crop science, economics, 
entomology, food science, genetics, horticultural science, marine sciences, microbiology, 
nutrition, physiology, plant pathology, sociology, soil science, toxicology, and zoology. 

Further information on graduate offerings may be found in the Graduate Catalog. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

A diversity of careers are available in agriculture and the life sciences. Areas pursued by 
graduates includes: 

Professional and Graduate Education— The college provides premedical programs at the 
undergraduate level for medical, dental, optometry and veterinary medicine; graduate 
education. 

Research— Medical, biological; agricultural environmental; engineering; processing; 
economics; marketing. 

Agricultural/ Horticultural Production— Livestock; poultry; aquaculture; fruits; vege- 
tables; ornamentals; turfgrass. 

81 



Business and Industry— Banking: real estate/farm appraising; technical sales; farm 
management: marketing: retail management: manufacturing: processing. 

Ennronmental/Conservation— Soil, water, forest, fish and wildlife, and education. 

Education / Government— Uigh school and college instruction in agriculture and life 
sciences: extension. 

Sen-ices— Inspection and regulation: environmental testing: product grading; con- 
sulting. 

The college has a Career Development and Placement Office, located in HI Patterson 
Hall. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

The curricula in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences have a common freshman 
year with the exception of the science program in biological and agricultural engineering. 
For the freshman year of that curriculum, see the College of Engineering. 



Fall Semester 



ALS 103 
BS 100 
CH 101 
ENG 111 
MA HI 
PE 100 



Credits 
1 



Introductory Topics in ALS 

General Biology or 

General Chemistry I' 4 

Composition & Rhetoric 3 

Precalculus- Algebra & Trig 3 

Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

(Military Science or Air Science may 

be elected) 



15 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



BS 100 General Biology or 
CH 101 General Chemistry I or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math, with Appl. or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A 3-4 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Physical Education 1 

(Military Science or Air Science may 
be elected) 

14-15 



'Both biology and chemistry are required for all ALS curricula. 

-Does not contribute to the 130 semester hours required in certain curricula. Consult departmental faculty adviser. 

CURRICULA IN AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 

Science, technology and business are three curricula offered in this college. All depart- 
ments offer the science curriculum. Several departments offer the choice of either science 
or technology. In addition, several departments are participating in interdisciplinary 
programs. 

An agricultural business management curriculum is offered by the Department of 
Agriculture and Resource Economics. Double majors between agricultural business man- 
agement and other subject areas may be arranged. 

All the curricula have a core of required courses on a college basis. Courses peculiar to a 
specific department are listed under the departmental requirements. Listed on the follow- 
ing pages are the required courses by curriculum on a college basis. All curricula require 
the completion of one course in literature. 



SCIENCE 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Language (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Etectires (Englurh, Communication or 

Modem Language) 6 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

Electives from Group D 21 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(27-31 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry I! or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 111 Precalc. Algebra & Trig 3 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math, with Appl. or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc A 3-4 

PY 211, PY212 College Physics I, II or 

PY 221 College Physics ...5-8 

Biological Sciences Elective 4 



82 



Electives (65-69 Credits) 

Departmental Requirements & Electives 26 

Restricted Electives from Group A 22-26 

Free Electives 13 

Physical Education 4 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 



BUSINESS 



(See Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics under College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences) 



TECHNOLOGY 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Language (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Comfwsition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

English Elective (Requirement may be satisfied 

by a modern language) 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

Electives from Group D 21 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(31-32 Credits) 

General Biology 4 

General Chemistry I 4 

General Chemistry II or 

Principles of Chemistry 4 

Precalc. Algebra & Trig 3 

Intro, to Finite Math, with Appl 4-3 

Analytic Geometry & Calc. A or 

College Physics 5 

Soil Science 4 

Biological Sciences Elective 4 



BS 


100 


CH 


101 


CH 


103 


CH 


107 


MA 


111 


MA 


114 


MA 


131 


PY 


221 


SSC 


200 



Electives (61,-65 Credits) 

Departmental Requirements & Electives 27 

Restricted Electives from Groups A, B or C 20-21 

Free Electives 13 

Physical Education 4 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

A B C D ELECTIVES 

The following lists provide typical courses that may be selected from each of the four 
groups. Group A includes the physical and biological sciences; Group B, economics and 
business; Group C, applied science and technology; and Group D, social sciences and 
humanities. Other appropriate courses may be selected by checking with the office of the 
Director of Academic Affairs. 



Group A 

PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Animal Science 

ANS 330 Reproductive Physiology 

ANS 405 Lactation 

ANS (NTR. PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 

ANS (NTR) 419 Human Nutrition in Health and 

Disease 
ANS (PHY) 502 Reproductive Physiology of 

Vertebrates 
ANS (GN) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement 
ANS (NTR) 516 A.B.C.D Animal Nutrition 

Research Methods 

Biochemistry 

BCH 1.50 Introductory Biochemical Concepts 
BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 
BCH 452 Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory 
BCH 453 Introduction to Molecular 

Biology and Metabolism 
BCH 552 Experimental Biochemistry 
BCH (GN) 561 Biochemical and Microbial 
Genetics 



I 



Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

BAE 303 Energy Conversion in Biological Systems 

Biological Sciences 

All courses listed with the BS designation. 

Biomathematiesi 

Appropriate courses 

Botany 

BO 200 Plant Life 

BO 213 Plants and Civilization 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 

BO (ZO) 365 Ecology Laboratory 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 

BO 413 Introductory Plant Anatomy 

BO(ZO)414 Cell Biology 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy 



83 



BO 522 Adv. Morphology and Phytogeny of Seed 

Plants 
BO 524 Grasses. Sedges and Rushes 
BO 565 Plant Community Ecology 

Chemist nft 

Appropriate Courses 

Computer Science^ 

Appropriate Courses 

Enlomulofry 

ENT301 Introduction to Forest Insects 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Entomology 

ENT(ZO)425 General Entomology 

ENT 502 Insect Diversity 

ENT 503 Functional Systems of Insects 

Fisherieg-Wildlife 

FW (FOR) 404 Forest Wildlife Management 
FW (ZO) 420 Fishery Science 
FW (ZO) 515 Fish Physiology 

Food Science 

FS 331 Food Engineering 

FS 402 Food Chemistry 

FS 403 Food Analysis 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology 

FS 504 Food Proteins and Enzymes 

FS ( M B ) 506 Advanced Food M icrobiology 

Forestry 

FOR (WPS) 273 Quantitative Methods in Forest 

Resources 
FOR (MEA. PM) 386 Agricultural and 

Forest Meteorology 
FOR (FW) 404 Forest Wildlife Management 

Genetics 

GN41I Principles of Genetics 
GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 
GN 504 Human Genetics 

GN (ANS) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement 
GN (ZO) 540 Evolution 
GN (BCH) 561 Biochemical and Microbial 
Genetics 

Marine. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences^ 

Appropriate courses. 

Mathematics^ 

Appropriate Courses 

Microbiology 

MB 200 Microbiology and World Affairs 

MB 401 General Microbiology 

M B ( FS) 405 Food M icrobiology 

MB411 Medical Microbiology 

MB 501 Advanced Microbiology I 

MB 502 Advi'nced Microbiology II 

MB (FS) 506 Advanced Food Microbiology 

MB 514 Microbial Metabolic Regulation 

MB (SSC) 532 Soil Microbiology 

MB 551 Immunology I 

Nutrition 

NTR ( ANS. PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 
NTR (ANS) 419 Human Nutrition in Health 

and Disease 
NTR (ANS) 516 A.B.C.D Animal Nutrition 

Research Methods 



Physicsf 

Appropriate Courses 

Physiotoffy 

PHY (ANS) 502 Reproductive Physiology of 

Vertebrates 
PHY (ZO) 503 General Physiolog>' I 
PHY (ZO) 504 General Physiologj- II 
PHY (ZO) 513 Comparative Physiology 

Plant Pathology 

PP 501 Phytopathology I 
PP 502 Phytopatholgy II 

Poultry Science 

PO 405 Avian Physiology 

PO (ANS, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition 

PO (ZO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology 



Soil Sciencef 



SSC 200 
SSC 511 
SSC 520 
SSC 522 



Soil Science 

Soil Physics 

Soil and Plant Analysis 

Soil Chemistry 



SSC (MB) 532 Soil Microbiology 

Statistics^ 

Appropriate Courses 

Zoology 

ZO 201 General Zoology 

ZO 205 Introduction to Cellular and 

Departmental Zoolog>' 
ZO 208 Introduction to Organismal and 

Evolutionary Zoologj' 
ZO 212 Basic Anatomy and Physiology 
ZO (MEA) 220 Marine Biology 
ZO 303 Vertebrate Zoology 

ZO 305 Cellular and Animal Physiology Laboratory 
ZO 315 General Parasitology 
ZO 323 Comparative Anatomy 
ZO 345 Histology 

ZO(BO)360 Introduction to Ecology 
ZO 361 Principles of Embryonic Development 
ZO (BO) 365 Ecolog>' Laboratory 
ZO 402 Invertebrate Zoologj' 
ZO 403 Invertebrate Zoology Laboratory 
ZO 410 Intro, to Animal Behavior 
ZO(BO)414 Cell Biology 
ZO ( FW) 420 Fishery Science 
Z0 421 Principles of Physiology 
ZO 422 Biological Clocks 
ZO (ENT) 425 General Entomology 
Z0 441 Biolog>' of Fishes 
ZO 442 Biology of Fishes Laboratory 
ZO 450 Evolutionary Biology 
ZO 460 Aquatic Natural History Laboratory 
ZO 480 Laboratory Techniques in Cellular Biology 
ZO (PHY) 503 General Phvsiolog>' I 
ZO (PHY) 504 General Physiology II 
ZO (PHY) 513 Comparative Physiology 
ZO (FW) 515 Fish Physiologj- 
ZO 517 Population Ecologj' 
ZO (PO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology 
ZO(GN)540 Evolution 

tCourses in these blocks are considered Physical 
Sciences. 



84 



Group B 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 



Accounting 



ACC210 

ACC 220 

ACC 280 
ACC 310 
ACC 311 
ACC 320 
ACC 330 
ACC 340 
ACC 410 
ACC 420 
ACC 430 
ACC 450 
ACC 460 



Accounting I— Concepts of Financial 

Reporting 

Accounting II— Introduction to Managerial 

Accounting 

Managerial Accounting 

Intermediate Financial Accounting I 

Intermediate Financial Accounting II 

Managerial Uses of Cost Data 

An Introduction to Income Taxation 

Accounting Information Systems 

Advanced Financial Accounting 

Production Cost Analysis and Control 

Advanced Income Tax 

Auditing Financial Information 

Specialized Financial Reporting 

Theory and Practice 



Economics and Bvniness 

EB 303 Farm Management 

EB 306 Agricultural Law 

EB 307 Business Law I 

EB 308 Business Law II 

EB 311 Agricultural Markets 

EB 313 Marketing Methods 

EB 320 Financial Management 

EB 325 Managerial Economics 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 

EB 332 Industrial Relations 

EB 346 International Business 

EB (ST) 350 Economics and Business Statistics 

EB 405 Regulatory Law 

EB415 Farm Appraisal and Finance 

EB 420 Financial Management of Corporations 

EB 422 Investments and Portfolio Management 

EB 425 Quantitative Methods of Management 

EB 451 Introduction to Econometrics 

EB 460 Marketing Research 

EB 465 Advertising and Promotion Management 

EB (TAM) 482 Textile Marketing Management 

EB (WPS) 485 Management Development Seminar 

Mathematics 

MA 122 Mathematics of Finance 

Stati,'itics 

ST (EB) 350 Economies and Business Statistics 

Group C 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Affricultural Communicatiomf 

AC 311 Communication Methods and Media 
AC 470 Agricultural Communications 
AC (FW) 485 Natural Resource Advocacy 

Animal Science 

ANS 100 Perspectives in Animal Science 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science 

ANS 201 Techniques of Animal Care 

ANS 202 Techniques of Horse Care 

ANS (PO) 204 Feeds and Feeding 

ANS 210 Microcomputers in Animal Production 

ANS 300 Animal Production Field Study Trip 

ANS(FS, NTR)301 Modern Nutrition 

ANS 302 Livestock and Dairy Evaluation 

ANS 303 Principles of Equine Evaluation 



ANS 308 Advanced Livestock Judging 

ANS 310 Basic Horse Husbandry 

ANS 311 Livestock Breeding and Improvement 

ANS (FS.PO) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 

ANS (FS) 324 Milk and Dairy Products 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 

ANS 403 Swine Management 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 

ANS 406 Sheep Management 

ANS 410 Equine Management 

ANS 412 Applied Animal Breeding 

ANS 510 Advanced Livestock Management 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering 

BAE 151 Elements of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering I 
BAE 201 Shop Processes and Management 
BAE 211 Farm Machinery 
BAE 221 Agricultural Systems I: Microcomputer 

Applications 
BAE 222 Agricultural Systems II: Methodologies 

and Approaches 
BAE 241 Computer Applications in Agriculture 
BAE 252 Elements of Biological and Agricultural 

Engineering II 
BAE 311 Agricultural Power and Machinery 
BAE (SSC) 323 Water Management 
BAE (SSC) 324 Elementary Surveying 
BAE 331 Agricultural Systems III: Management 

Techniques 
BAE 332 Farm Structures 
BAE 333 Processing Agricultural Products 
BAE 342 Agricultural Processing 
BAE 343 Agricultural Electrification 
BAE 344 Circuits and Controls 
BAE 411 Farm Power and Machinery 
BAE 433 Processing Agricultural Products 
BAE 441 Agricultural Systems IV: Modelling and 

Analysis 
BAE 442 Agricultural Systems V: Senior Project 
BAE 471 Soil and Water Engineering 
BAE 481 Agricultural Structures and Environment 
BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management 

Botany 

BO (CS, ENT. PM, PP) 525 Biological Control 

Civil Engineering 

CE (BAE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management 

Crop Science 

CS211 Introduction to Crop Plant 

CS 213 Crops: Adaptation and Production 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops 

CS 316 Soybean Production 

CS 317 Corn Production 

CS 318 Corn and Soybean Production 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production 

CS413 Plant Breeding 

CS 414 Weed Science 

CS 415 Agronomic Pest Management Systems 

CS (SSC) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems 

CS 51 1 Tobacco Technology 

CS 513 Physiological Aspects of Crop Production 

CS (HS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science 

CS (BO. ENT. PM. PP) 525 Biological Control 

Entomology 

ENT 203 Introduction to the Honey Bee and 

Beekeeping 
ENT (BO, CS, PM. PPt 525 Biological Control 



85 



ENT 550 Fundamentals of Insect Control 

ENT 562 Insect Pest Manaffement in Ajaricultural 

Crops 
ENT (ZO) 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology 

Fixheries- Wildlife 

FW (ZO) 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 
FW (FOR) 310 Fisheries and Wildlife 

Inventory and Management 
FW (ZOI 353 Wildlife Management 
FW (ZOl 430 Fisheries-Wildlife Administration 
FW (AC) 485 Natural Resource Advocacy 

Food Science 

FS 201 Food Science and the Consumer 
FS (ANS. NTR) 301 Modern Nutrition 
FS (ANS. PO) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 
FS (ANS) 324 Milk and Dairy Products 
FS 400 Principles of Human Nutrition 
FS 416 Quality Control of Food Products 
FS 421 Food Preservation 
FS 423 Muscle Food Technology 
FS 425 Processing Dairy Products 
FS ( HS ) 462 Postharvest Physiology 

Genet icx 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 
GN (PO) 520 Poultry Breeding 

Horticultural Science 

HS 100 Home Horticulture 

HS 101 Plants for Home and Pleasure 

HS201 Principles of Horticulture 

HS 211 OrnamenUl Plants I 

HS 212 Ornamental Plants H 

HS 301 Plant Propagation 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 

HS371 Interior Plantseapes 

HS400 Residential Landscaping 

HS411 Nursery Management 

HS 416 Principles of Ornamental Planting Design 

HS 421 Tree Fruit Production 

HS 422 Small Fruit Production 

HS 431 Vegetable Production 

HS 440 Greenhouse Management 

HS441 Floriculture I 

HS442 Floriculture II 

H S ( FS ) 462 Postharvest Physiology 

HS 471 Tree and Ground Maintenance 

HS (CS) 514 Principles and Methods in Weed Science 

HS 531 Physiology of Landscape Plants 

S'utrilion 

NTR (ANS. FS) 301 Modern Nutrition 

Group D 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES^ 

The stucient is required to complete 21 semester hours of Group D courses in all degree 
programs in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The student must take 6 semester 
hours from Area I and 6 semester hours from Area II courses. The remaining 9 hours may 
come from any courses in Area III. Not more than 6 semester hours are to come from one 
department. A course in Economics and a course in Sociology are highly recommended. 

'Includes only courses in humanities and social sciences on approved Master Lists available from 115 Patterson Hall or 
adviser. 



Pest Management 

PM 111 Introduction to Integrated Pest Management 
PM (SSC) 370 Altef-native Agricultural Systems 
PM (FOR. MEA) 386 Agricultural and Forest 

Meteorology 
PM 405 Theory and Practice of 

Integrated Pest Management 
PM (BO, CS. ENT. PP) 525 Biological Control 

Plant Patholoffy 

PP 315 Principles of Plant Pathology 

PP (FOR) 318 Forest Pathology 

PP415 Plant Disease Control 

PP 505 Histopatholog^' 

PP (BO. CS, ENT. PM) 525 Biological Control 

Poultry Science 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production 

PO (ANS) 204 Feeds and Feeding 

PO 301 Evaluation of Live Poultry 

PO (ANS, FS.) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 

PO 351 Grading and Evaluation of Poultry Products 

PO 410 Production and Management of Game Birds 

in Confinement 
PO 420 Turkey Production 
PO 421 Commercial Egg Production 
PO 422 Incubation and Hatchery Management 
PO 423 Broiler Production 
PO (GN) 520 Poultry Breeding 

Soil Science 

SSC (BAE) 323 Water Management 
SSC (BAE) 324 Elementary Surveying 
SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 
SSC 342 Soil Fertility Laboratory 
SSC 361 Non-Agricultural Land Use and 

Management 
SSC (PM) 370 Alternative Agricultural Systems 
SSC 452 Soil Classification 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties and Plant Growth 
SSC (CS) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems 
SSC 472 Forest Soils 

Veterinary Science 



Poultry Diseases 
Diseases of Farm Animals 



VMF401 
VMF 420 

Zooloffy 

ZO (FW) 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 

ZO (FW) ,353 Wildlife Management 

ZO 419 Limnology 

ZO (FW) 430 Fisheries-Wildlife Administration 

ZO (ENT) 582 Medical and Veterinary Entomology 



86 



AREA I 

HumanitieK (6 xemexter hours) 

Courses from approved Master List I in the following 
disciplines: 

English Lanpjage Literature 
Foreign Language— courses at 200-level or above- 
History 
History of Art 

Music— courses at 200-level or above 
Philosophy 
Religion 

AREA II 

Social Seienceis (6 semester hours) 

Courses from approved Master List II in the following 
disciplines: 

Anthropology 
Economics-Business 



Political Science 

Psychology 

Sociology 

AREA III 

Humanities or Social Sciences (9 semester hours) 

Courses from any of the three approved Master Lists: 

Any Master List I course— Humanities 

Any Master List II course— Social Sciences 

Any Master List III course— Supplemental courses 

(Architecture, Communication, Design, 
Education, English Language Writing, 
Landscape Architecture, Political Science, 
Recreation Resources Administration, 
Social Work, Multidisciplinary Studies) 

'Foreign language at the 100-level may be used to 
satisfy the college language requirement. 



ADULT AND COMMUNITY 
COLLEGE EDUCATION 

(See Graduate Catalog.) 



AGRONOMY 



Williams Hall 

Professor J. C. Wynne, Head of the Crop Science Department 

Professor E. J. Kamprath, Head of the Soil Science Department 

Associate Professor 3. M. DiPaola, Undergraduate Coordinator— Crop Science 

Associate Professor H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Coordinator— Soil Science 

Agronomy is the development and practical application of plant and soil sciences to 
produce abundant, high quality food, feed, fiber and other crops. Agronomists serve a vital 
role in world agriculture and environmental quality. Student may earn a Bachelor of 
Science degree under the technology curriculum of the College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences with a major of Agronomy. The agronomy curriculum is administered jointly by 
the Departments of Crop Science and Soil Science. Crop science related primarily to the 
genetics, breeding, physiology, and management of field and turf crops. Soil science is 
oriented toward soil physics, chemistry, origin, microbiology, fertility, and management. 
For further information, see Crop Science or Soil Science. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRONOMY 
TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 



ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 



Credits 
1 



87 



iMnguages (12 Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 1 10 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 CrediU) 

Electives (EB 212 required for CP. SS, and TM; EB 212 and EB 202 or EB 301 for Agr B; ENG 333 for SS) 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(31-35 Credits) 

BO 421 Plant Physiology or 

MB 401 General Microbiology (SS) 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry (BS, SS) 4 

MA 1 1 1 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry 3 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A (BS.SS and Agr-B) or 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 4-3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Physical Education and Free Electives 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education 3 

Free Electives 13 

Agronomy Requirements 
(22-2J, Credits) 

CS 21 1 Introduction to the Crop Plant 2 

CS 212 Introduction to Crop Management 2 

CS 411 Environmental Aspects of Crop Production 2 

CS 413 Plant Breeding (except SS) 2 

CS 414 Weed Science 4 

CS 490 Senior Seminar in Crop Science or 

SSC 490 Senior Seminar in Soil Science 1 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers 3 

SSC 342 Soil Fertility and Fertilizers Lab 1 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 4 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties and Plant Growth 3 

Advised Electives (21-25 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry (CP. TM. Agr B. SS) or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I (BS) 4 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN 4 1 1 Principles of Genetics (except SS) 3-4 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical (SS) Z 

MEA 110 Geology I Ub (SS) 1 

Concentrations (Students are to select one concentration and complete the requirement as listed) 14-18 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation i;iO 

CROP PRODUCTION (CP) 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 

CS 312 Pastures and Forage Crops ;} 

EB 303 Farm Management 3 

PP 315 Principles of Plant Pathology or 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Entomology 4-3 

SSC (CS) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems 3 

Elective 2-4 

15-18 



I 



TURFGRASS MANAGEMENT (TM) 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 

CS ;U5 Turf Management 3 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 3 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 3 

PP 315 Principles of Plant Pathology or 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Entomology 4-3 

Elective ■ • • 2-4 

15-18 

BASIC SCIENCES (BS) 

BCH 451 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry H 4 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 

MB 401 General Microbiology or 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biolog>' 4-3 

PP 315 Principles of Plant Pathology or 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Entomolog>' 4-3 

14-16 

SOIL SCIENCES (SS) 

BAE (SSC) 323 Water Management 4 

CS 214 Crop Science Laboratory 1 

SSC 361 Non-Agricultural Land Use & Management 3 

SSC (CS) 462 Soil-Crop Management 3 

Advised Elective 3 

Statistics or Computer Sci. Elective 3 

17 

AGRONOMIC BUSINESS (AGR B) 

Crops and Soils 
PP 315 Principles of Plant Pathology or 

ENT 312 Introduction to Economic Entomology 4-3 

SSC (CS) 462 Soil-Crop Management Systems 3 

Principles of Economics 
EB 202 Economics II' or EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics' 
EB 212 Economics of Agriculture' 
' Taken a^i Social Science/Humanities (Group D) electives 

Principles of Accounting 
ACC 210 Accounting I 3 

Business Courses (Select one course from each of two of the following six areas) • 6 

15-16 

Managerial Economics 

EB 303 Farm Management 

EB 325 Managerial Economics 
Finance 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance 

EB 420 Financial Management of Corporations 
Personnel 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 

EB 332 Industrial Relations 

EB 431 Labor Economics^ 
Marketing 

EB 31 1 Agricultural Markets 

EB 313 Marketing Methods 

EB 430 Agricultural Price Analysis- 
Laif 

EB 306 Agricultural Law 

Public Policy 
EB410 Public Finance^ 

EB 413 Competition. Monopoly, and Public Policy^ 
EB 436 Environmental Economics^ 
EB 433 U.S. Agricultural Policy- 

2 Require EB 301 as prerequisite. EB 301 may be taken as an extraelective or may be substituted for EB 202 above. 

89 



AGRICULTURAL AND RESOURCE ECONOMICS 

Patterson Hall (Room 216) 

Professor R. A. Schrimper. Interim Head 

Professor C. L. Moore, Associate Head and Extension Specialist-in-Charge 

Professor D. K. Pearce. Administrator, Economics Graduate Programs 

Professor L. A. Ihnen, Undergraduate Programs Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Profesnorii: G. A. Carlson. A.J. Coutu. A. R. Gallant. T. J. Grennes. D. M . Hoover. P. R. Johnson. T. Johnson. E. C. Pasour. 
Jr.. R. J. Peeler. Jr.. R. K. Perrin. D. A. Sumner. M. K. Wohlgenant: Adjunct Professor: J. B. Hunt. Jr.: Profesors 
Emeriti: R. A. Kin?. J. A. Seagraves. R. L. Simmons. J. G. Sutherland (USDA). W. D. Toussaint. J. C. Williamson. Jr.; 
Axsociate Professors: R. B. Palmquist. R. R. Rucker. W. N. Thurman: Associate Professor Emeritus: H. C. Gilliam. Jr. 
(USDA); Assistant Professors: J . C. Beghin. R. N. Collender. P. L. Fackler. W. E. Foster; Assistant Professor Emeritus: 
J. C. Matthews. Jr.: Lecturers: A. M. Deals. Jr.. J. W. Bertha. S. C. Rhudy. S. L. Robinson. H. A. Sampson. Ill; Adjunct 
Instructor: W. A. Graham, HI. 

EXTENSION 

Professors: R. D. Dahle. L. E. Danielson. J. E. Easley. Jr.. W. D. Eickhoff, H. L. Liner. D. F. Neuman. M. L, Walden. R. C. 
Wells: Professors Emeriti: R. C. Brooks. D. G. Harwood. Jr.. T. E. Nichols. Jr.. C. R. Pugh. W. L. Turner. C. R. Weathers: 
Associate Professors: G. A. Benson. E. A. Estes. D. L. Hoag. C. D. Safley. K. D. Zering: Associate Professors Emeriti: J. G. 
Allgood. R. S. Boal. D. D. Robinson. P. S. Stone: Assistant Professors: T. R. Fortenbery. A. R. Oltmans: Assistant 
Professor Emeritus: E. M. Stallings: Extension Specialists: R. N. Barnes. R. H. Usry. 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics serves agriculture, resource 
and related industries through its extension, research and teaching programs. Applying 
principles of economics and related disciplines, these programs develop understanding of 
contemporary economic and business problems and equip students with a knowledge of 
business organization fundamentals and decision-making skills useful in the operation and 
management of business firms. 

The department offers undergraduate programs leading to Bachelor of Science degrees 
in agricultural business management and in agricultural economics. A concentration in 
biological sciences is also offered within the agricultural business management program. 
The agricultural business management program prepares graduates for management, 
marketing, sales, finance and related careers. The agricultural economics program pro- 
vides a similar background in economics and business together with the opportunity for 
more extensive coursework in basic and applied sciences and prepares graduates for 
business careers and advanced study. The concentration in biological sciences prepares 
graduates for management, marketing, and sales careers in fields such as biotechnology, 
pharmaceuticals, health care, environmental protection, food processing and finance deal- 
ing with biological issues. This concentration is designed to be an attractive option for 
students with a strong background and interest in science who seek alternative to technical 
science careers. 

For a description of related programs offered by the Division of Economics and Business, 
see the listing under the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The growing number of specialized business firms producing and marketing services 
and products in agriculture, resource and life science-related industries has created an 
increasing demand for graduates trained in agricultural and biological business manage- 
ment and agricultural economics. Employment opportunities include careers with com- 
panies purchasing, processing, and marketing food, fiber and realted products; firms 
producing and marketing production inputs (feed, equipment, chemicals, drugs, etc.) and 
services; banks; other financial and credit agencies; and cooperatives. 

Many graduates pursue careers in research and education with various agencies of the 
federal and state governments. These agencies include the Agricultural Extension Service, 



90 



the Agricultural Research Service, the State Department of Agriculture and the United 
States Department of Agriculture. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 



Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking or 

COM (SP) 146 Business and Prof. Commun 3 

Elective English or foreign language 

literature) 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

EB 202 Economics II 3 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

Electives (Group D) 15 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(29 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biolog>' 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Their Uses or 
BAE 241 Computer Applications in Agri. & 

Life Sci 3 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra & Trigonometry 3 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math. Appl 3 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus, or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Bio. Sci. Elect. (From Group A or 

GN 301. NTR 301 or SSC 200) 3 



Physical Education and Free Electii'es 
(I? Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Departmental Reguirements and Electives 
(50 Credits) 
ACC 210 Accounting I. or 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 

EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 

EB 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

EB 303 Farm Management, or 

EB 325 Managerial Economics 3 

EB306 Agricultural Law. or 

EB 307 Business Law I 3 

EB 311 Agricultural Markets, or 

EB 313 Marketing Methods 3 

EB 326 Human Resource Management, or 
EB 332 Industrial Relations, or 

EB 431 Labor Economics 3 

EB (ST) 350 Economics and Business Statistics ... 3 

EB 320 Financial Mgmt. or 

EB415 Farm Appraisal & Finance or 

EB 404 Money. Financial Markets & the 

Economy 3 

EB 433 U. S. Agricultural Policy 3 

Technical agriculture electives 

(from Group C or Forestry) 9 

Departmental or technical 

agriculture electives 11 

Minimum hours for graduation 130 



CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT WITH 
CONCENTRATION IN BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 



Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking or 

COM (SP) 146 Bus. & Prof. Communication 3 

Elective (English or Foreign Language 

Literature 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 3 

HI 341 Technology- in History 3 

COM (SP) 201 Persuasion Theory 3 

Elective (Ethics. Philosophy or Religion) 3 

Elective (Group D) 3 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(12 Credits) 
BAE 221 Agri. Microcomputer Appl. or 

BAE 241 Computer Application in ALS 3 

BO 200 Plant Life or 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

BO (ZO) 360 Intro, to Ecology mth 
BO (ZO) 365 Ecology Laboratory or 
BO 400 Plant Diversity or 

ZO 330 Vertebrate Zoology or 4 

ZO 450 Evolutionary Biology 3 

BS 100 General Biolog>' 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 3 

GN411 Principles of Genetics 4 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math, or 

MA 231 Anly. Geometry & Calculus B 3 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Anly. Geometry & Calculus A 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

ZO 201 General Zoology or 

ZO 205 Intro. Cell & Dev. Zoo. or 

ZO 208 Intro. Org. & Evol. Zoo 4 



91 



EB 320 Financial Management or 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance 3 

EB 325 Managerial Economics 3 

EB(ST)350 Econ. & Bus. Sut. or 

St 361 Intro. Stat, for Engineers 3 

ENG 331 Commun. for Engr. & Tech. or 
ENG 332 Commun. for Bus. Mgt. or 

ENG 333 Commun. for Sci. & Res 3 

DepartmenUl Elective (from DARE courses) 3 

Departmental Electives (from DARE or 
other CALS courses 11 

Minimum Hours for Graduation 130* 

•Must include at least 6 hours of 400 or 500 level courses. 



Pkyneai Education and Frtt EUetives 
116 CrtdiU) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physic*! Education Electivea 3 

Fre* Electives 12 

Drpartmrntal RtffuirrmrnU and Electives 
(J>i CrrdxU) 
ACC 280 Managerial Accounting or 

ACC 220 Accounting U 3 

EB302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

EB306 Agricultural Law 3 

EB 31 1 Agricultural Markets or 

EB .^n Markftinu Methods 3 

MINOR IN AGRICULTURAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics offers a minor in Agricultural 
Business Management. This minor provides students an opportunity to learn basic concepts 
useful in manv careers in agricultural business. A total of 15 hours of coursework is 
required, including EB 212. ACC 280. EB 303or EB 311 and twoadditional courses chosen 
from a list of selected agricultural economics and business-related courses. Consult the 
Department for specific information. 

CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
SCIENCE PROGRAM 



CrediU 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (li Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Elective (English or foreign language literature) ... 3 

Elective (Language or communication) 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(it Credits) 

EB 202 Economics I 3 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

Electives (Group D) 15 

Physical Biological Sciences 
(36 Credits) 
BS 100 General Biology, or 

BS 105 Biolog>' in the Modern World 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

CSC 200 Introduction to Computers, or 

BAE 241 Comp Appl. in Agri. & Life Sci 3 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry ..3 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B 3 

FY 221 College Physics 5 

Bio. Sci. Elec. (From Group A or 

GN 301. NTR 301 or SSC 200) 3 



Physical Education & Free Electii>es 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Group A and C Electives 
(11 Credits) 

Electives 11 

Departmental Recfuirements and Electives 
(S2 Credits) 
ACC 210 Accounting I. or 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 

EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 

EB302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

EB (ST) 350 Economics and Business Statistics ... 3 

EB 433 U.S. Agricultural Policy 3 

Electives (Agricultural Economics. EB 

303. 311. 415. 430. 436. 515. 521. 

523. 533. or 551) 9 

Electives (Any ACC or EB or other 

course approved by Undergraduate 

Coordinator) 8 

Minimum hours for graduation 130 



MINOR IN AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

The Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics offers a minor in Agricultural 
Economics. This minor provides students an introduction to agricultural economics train- 
ing that complements training in agriculture and applied sciences and will be especially 
useful for further training at the graduate level. A total of 15 hours of coursework is 
required, including EB 212 or EB201. EB301, EB 433 and twoadditional courses chosen 
from a selected list of agricultural economics courses. Consult the department for addi- 
tional information. 



92 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 

Polk Hall (Room 123) 

Professor L. S. Bull, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor M. T. Coffey, dissociate Department Head for Extension 

Associate Professor J. C. Cornwell, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Associate Professor K. L. Esbenshade, Graduate Administrator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Distinguished University Research Professor: C. L. Markert 
Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: K. R. Pond 
William Neat Reifnolds Professors: J. G. Lecce, E. J. Eisen 

Professors: J. H. Britt, E. V. Caruolo. A. J. Clawson. W. J. Croom. Jr.. D. G. Davenport. R. W. Harvey. W. L. Johnson. E. E. 
Jones. C. L. Market. B. T. McDaniel. R. M. Fetters. B. R. Poulton. A. H. Rakes. H. A. Ramsey. 0. W. Robison. J. W. 
Spears. J. C. Wilk: Professors Emeriti: E. R. Barrick. L. Goode. C. A. Lassiter. J. M. Leatherwood. J. E. Legates. R. D. 
Mochrie. R. M. Myers.'l. D. Porterfield. F. H. Smith. L. C. Ulberg. G. H. Wise: Associate Professors: B. P. Alston-Mills. 
M. D. Whitacre: Adjunct Associate Professors: F. C. Gunsett. E. C. Segerson. Jr.: Associate Professors Emeriti: E. U. 
Dillard. J. J. McNeiV. Assistant Professors: J. D.Armstrong. C. E. Farin. U.G. Whitworth. Jr.:L«'c<urer.D.T. Barnett: 
Research Associates: J. M. Luginbuhl. K. Momoi. M. L. Reed. M. D. Sanchez: Teaching Technician: M. G. Hamm. 
Associate Members of the Faculty: J. C. Burns (Crop Science). R. G. Crickenberger (NCAES). W. M. Hagler (Plant 
Pathologj'. Poultry Science), D. K. Larick (Food Science). 

EXTENSION 

Associate Professor R. L. McCraw, Coordinator Animal Husbandry 
Professor D. P. Wesen, Coordinator Dairy Husbandry 
Associate Professor M. T. Coffey, Coordinator, Swine Husbandry 
Associate Professor: R. A. Mowrey, Jr., Coordinator, Horse Husbandry 

Professors: K. R. Butcher. J. R. Jones. F. D. Sargent. CM. Stanislaw. L. W. Whitlow: Professors Emeriti: A. V. Allen. R. F. 
Behlow. T. C. Blalock. J. S. Buchanan. G. Hyatt. Jr.. F.N. Knott. G. S. Parsons. J. W. Patterson. J. R. Woodard: Associate 
Professor: R. E. Lichtenwalner:>l,ssi'.s7a>i?/'ro/V.ssors; W. L. Flowers. B. A. Hopkins. W. E. M. Morrow. M. H. Poore. W. 
D. Schoenherr. S. P. Washburn: Extension Specialists: B. C. Allison. M. C. Claeys. J. S. Clay. G. M. Gregory. J. H. 
Gregory. R. M. Hughes. D. C. Miller. J. W. Parker. Jr.. R. W. Swain. 

Animal Science is a broad field centered on the biology, production, and management of 
economically important farm and companion animals. Domestic livestock have, through- 
out history provided man with a major source of food, fiber, pleasure and companionship. 
Undergraduate students study subjects related to various phases of animal science. Courses 
are offered in nutrition, physiolog>', breeding and management, and there are opportuni- 
ties for the application of basic scientific training in the husbandry areas. Options for 
course selection by each student make it possible for those with varying backgrounds and 
wide-ranging interests to become involved in stimulating and rewarding experiences. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Opportunities for animal scientists are boundless and the areas of emphasis are diverse. 
Animal Science graduates are qualified for positions in a wide variety of areas such as: 
livestock management, feed and animal health product companies, livestock marketing, 
meat processing industries, feedlot managers or consultants, state and federal departments 
of agriculture, breed associations, education, financial institutions, livestock publications, 
technical service managers, animal technicians, media specialists, agricultural extension 
service and public relations. Animal scientists can be found across the nation and around 
the world in all phases of production, research, sales, service, business and education. Many 
students in pre-veterinary medicine obtain degrees in animal science. Students may elect 
graduate study, after which they will find opportunities in teaching, research and exten- 
sion. See listing of graduate degrees offered. 

93 



CURRICULA IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

The depree of Bachelor of Science with a major in animal science may be obtained under 
either the science or technologr>' curricula offered in Agriculture and Life Sciences. For the 
basic requirements and freshman year refer to those sections under College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

CrediU 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 1 10 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences (21 Credits) 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

Electives 18 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(26-31 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry 3 

MA VAX Analytic Geometry & Calculus A or 

MA 1 14 Intro, to Finite Math with Appl 4-3 

PY221 College Phvsics or 

PY 21 1 & 212 College Physics 1,11 5-8 

ZO .S03 Vertebrate Zoology or 

ZO 323 Comparative Anatomy or 

ZO 421 Principles of Physiology 4-3 

Physical Education and Free Electives (17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Group A. B, C. Courses (26-29 Credits) 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 2^3 Organic Chemistry II 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

Other (Recommend inclusion of BCH 451. ST 311. EB 303. ANS 210 or BAE 241 or CSC 200) 10-13 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

ANS 100 Perpectives in Animal Science 1 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science 4 

ANS (PO) 204 Feeds and Feeding 4 

ANS 31 1 Livestock Breeding and Improvement 3 

ANS ;«0 Reproductive Physiology 3 

ANS (PO, NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

ANS 490 Seminar in Animal Science 1 

Select a minimum of 8 credits from: (At least 6 hrs. must be from management** courses) 

ANS 201 Techniques of Animal Care 2 

ANS 202 Techniques of Horse Care 2 

ANS 300 Animal Production Field Study Trip 1 

ANS .302 Livestock and Dairy Evaluation 3 

ANS .303 Principlesof Equine Evaluation 2 

ANS 310 Basic Horse Husbandry 3 

ANS (FS) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 3 

ANS (FS) 324 Milk and Dairy Production 3 

••ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 3 

••ANS 403 Swine Management 3 

••ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 3 

ANS 405 locution 3 



94 



**ANS 406 Sheep Management 3 

**ANS 410 Equine Management 3 

ANS 412 Applied Animal Breeding 1-4 

VMF 420 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

(See also Pre-Professional Program in Veterinary Medicine) 
TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 1 10 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences (21 Credits) 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

Electives 18 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(27-31 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry 3 

MA 131 Analytical Geometry & Calculus A or 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Math with Appl 4-3 

FY 221 College Physics or 

FY 211 & 212 College Physics I. II 5-8 

Biological Science Elective 4 

Physical Education and Free Electives (16 Credits) 

FE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Group A. B, C Electives (25 Credits) 

ANS 330 Reproductive Physiology 3 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry 4 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 3-4 

Group A, BorC Electives(Recommend inclusion of ANS 210 

or BAE 241 or CSC 200) 9 

Group B Electives (Recommend inclusion of EB 303) 6 

Departmental Requirements and Electives (27 Credits) 

ANS 100 Perspectives in Animal Science 1 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science 4 

ANS 204 Feeds and Feeding 4 

ANS 311 Livestock Breeding and Improvement 3 

ANS (NTR. PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

ANS 490 Seminar in Animal Science 1 

Select a minimum of 9 credits from: (At least 6 hrs. must be from management** courses) 

ANS (FS) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 3 

ANS (FS) 324 Milk and Dairy Products 3 

**ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 3 

**ANS 403 Swine Management 3 

**ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 3 

ANS 405 Lactation 3 

**ANS 406 Sheep Management 3 

**ANS 410 Equine Management 3 

VMF 420 Diseases of Farm Animals 3 

Select a minimum of 2 hours from: 

ANS 201 Techniques of Animal Care 2 

ANS 202 Techniques of Horse Care 2 

ANS 300 Animal Production Field Study Trip 1 

ANS 302 Livestock and Dairy Evaluation 3 

95 



ANS 303 Principles of Equine Evaluation 

ANS 310 Basic Horse Husbandn- 

ANS (FS. PO) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs ^ 

ANS (FS) 324 Milk and Dairy Products ^ 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management 

ANS 403 Swine Management 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management ^ 

ANS 405 Lactation ^ „ 

ANS 406 Sheep Management ^ 

ANS 410 Horse Science ^ 

ANS 412 Applied Animal Breeding 



1-4 



VMF 420 Diseases of Farm Animals ^ 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

MINOR IN ANIMAL SCIENCE 

A minor in Animal Science is open to all interested baccalaureate students. This minor is 
designed primarily to complement curricula in Agricultural Business Management. Agri- 
cultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Agronomy, Food Science. Poultry Science, 
and Zoology. Students completing a minor in Animal Science will become familiar with 
animal production and with its related industries, their fundamental components, ternrii- 
nology. and dynamic nature. The minor requires a minimum of 15 credit hours, and its 
course of study is flexible in order that students may emphasize the discipline or species of 
their interest. 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

Polk Hall (Room 128) 

Professor P. F. Agris, Head of the Department 

Professor H. R. Horton, Undergraduate Coordinator 

University Professors: F. R. Armstrong, E. C. Theil 

Aluynni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: H. 
R. Horton 

Profexnom: W. L. Miller. J. D. Otvos, E. C. Sisler; Profeaxors Emeriti: F. B. Armstrong, J. S. Kahn. I. S. Longmuir. S. B. 
Tove: AxHociate Profexsom: J. A. Knopp. E. S. Maxwell; Adjunct Axsociate Professor: E. L. Treadwell; Ansiatatit 
ProfexHors: L. K. Hanley-Bowdoin, C. C. Hardin: Research Associates: J. Chen, P. N. Lin; Associate Members of the 
Faculty: E. E. Jones (Animal Science), R. R. Sederoff (Forestry. Genetics) H. E. Swaisgood (Food Science). 

The Biochemistry program provides B.S. graduates with the scientific background and 
skills required for employment in university, industrial, state, and federal research labora- 
tories. The curriculum is especially suite(i to students preparing for graduate study in 
biochemistry, molecular biology, biotechnology, medical, and related fields. It emphasizes 
the fundamentals of biological and physical sciences, offering students breadth of knowl- 
edge and depth of understanding. The curriculum provides students with broad experience 
in biological and chemical laboratories and encourages the development of experimental 
skills. Opportunities are provided for highly qualified students to undertake honors 
research during their junior and/or senior years. 

BIOCHEMISTRY CURRICULUM 

AI„S Ki:^ Inlro<luclory Topics in ALS 1 

Laufftiages il2 Creditx) 

F.NG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

FL Foreign language 6 



96 



Humanities and Social Sciences (21 Credits) 

Electives must include 6 credit hours each from the humanities and the social sciences 21 

Also, at least one literature course must be included within the required 21 credit hours. 

Mathematical Science and Physics (21-23' Credits) 

MA 141'. 241'. 242' Analytic Geometry and Calculus I. II. and III (4.4.4) 

or 

MA i;n. 231. ST 311 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A and B (4,3) and Introduction to Statistics (3) 12'-10 

Computer. Mathematics, or Statistics elective (3) 3 

PY 205'. 208' General Physics (4.4) 

or 
PY 211. 212 College Physics I. II (4.4) 8 

Chemistry and Laboratory Analysis (23-26' Credits) 

CH 101. 107 General Chemistry (4) and Principles of Chemistry (4) 8 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chemistry I and II (4.4) 8 

CH 431'. 433' Physical Chemistry I and II (3.3) or 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry 6'-4 

Laboratory Analysis elective: e.g.. CH 315 (4) or CH 428' (3) 4-3' 

Life Sciences (31,-35 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Life Sciences electives (must include both animal and plant science courses, and a course in physiology 

or cell biology) 11-12 

BCH 150 Introductory Biochemical Concepts 2 

BCH 451. 452 Introductory Biochemistry and Laboratory (3,2) 5 

BCH 453 Introduction to Molecular Biology and Metabolism 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 4 

Laboratory or Library Research (e.g.. BCH 490) 1 

Electives (16-18 Credits) 

Technical electives (Advised) 0-2 

Free electives 12 

Physical Education (PE 100 plus Physical Education Electives) ■■ 4 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

' Recommended for students preparing for graduate study in Biochemistry. 



BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

(Also see Engineering.) 
David S. Weaver Laboratories (Room 100) 
Professor J. H. Ruff, Head of Department 
Professor R. S. Sowell, Graduate Administrator 
Professor G. B. Blum, Jr., Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Alumni Disting^iished Undergraduate Professor: G. B. Blum, Jr. 
William Neal Reynolds Professor: R. W. Skaggs 

Professors: C. F. Abrams. Jr.. E. G. Humphries. W. H. Johnson. G. J. Kriz. W. F. McClure. R. P. Rohrbach. L. M. Safley. 
Jr.. R. W. Skaggs. L. F. Stikeleather. C. W. Suggs. P. W. Westerman. T. B. Whitaker (USDA). D. H. Willits. J. H. Young: 
Professors Emeriti: H. D. Bowen.J. W. Dickens. J. M. Fore.G. W.Giles. F.J. Hassler. E. L. Howell. D. H. Howells. J. W. 
Weaver. Jr.. E. H. Wiser: Associate Professor: G. R. Baughman. R. W. Bottcher. C. G. Bowers. Jr.: Assistant Professors: 
R. D. Huffman. J. E. Parsons: Adjunct Assistant Professors: G. M. Jividen. S. K. Seymour: Instntctor: M. D. Boyette; 
Research Associate: C. Murugaboopathi: Associate Members of the Facxdty: D. D. Hamann. V. A. Jones. T. M. Losordo 
(Zoology). K. R. Swartzel (Food Science): A. E. Hassan (Forestry). D. C. Richardson (Companion Animal & Special 
Species Medicine). T. M. Losordo (Zoology): Senior Researcher: S. C. Mohapatra. 

97 



EXTENSION 

Frufessor: F. J. Humenik, Associate Head in Charge of Extension 

Profrfon.}. C. Barker. L B. Driggers. R. E. Sneed; Professors Emeriti- E. 0. Beasley. H. M. Ellis. J. W. Glover. R. W. 
Watkins AucciaU Profemor: A. R. Rubin: Associate Professor Emeritus: W. C. Warrick; Assistant Professor: G. D. 
Jennings; Eitrnxion SpecialisU:J. A. Arnold. S. L. Brichford, S. W. Coffey. R. 0. Evans. Jr.. R. L. McLymore. 

Biological and Agricultural Engineering is the engineering discipline that uses engi- 
neering principles to solve problems and improve situations involving biological and agri- 
cultural systems. The goals are to improve efficiency, conserve natural resources, protect 
the environment and, in general, to contribute to improving the quality of life as impacted 
bv biological and agricultural systems. 

Two curricula are offered. Biological and Agricultural Engineering and Agricultural 
Systems Technology. The Biological and Agricultural Engineering curriculum, which is 
accredited by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the 
degree Bachelor of Science in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Graduates of the 
Agricultural Systems Technology curriculum receive the degree Bachelor of Science in 
Agricultural System Technology. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of the Biological and Agricultural Engineering curriculum are qualified for 
positions in design, development and research in public institutions and in industry. This 
curriculum also provides adequate preparation for post-graduate work leading to 
advanced degrees. (See listing of graduate degrees offered.) 

Those receiving degrees in Agricultural Systems Technology are qualified for positions 
in sales, services, and management of agribusinesses such as farm machinery, irrigation 
systems, etc.; as county agents or farmers; and for various types of agricultural advisory 
work. 

CURRICULUM BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

ENGINEERING PROGRAM 

The engineering curriculum provides an educational program for students which uni- 
quely prepares them for dealing with engineering problems in the biological and agricul- 
tural areas. Emphasis is placed on basic science and engineering courses such as mathe- 
matics, physics, mechanics, biology, soils, and thermodynamics which provide a sound 
background for the application of engineering to agricultural and biological problems. 

Since biological and agricultural engineering involves the disciplines of biology, agricul- 
ture and engineering, the curriculum is a joint administered by the Colleges of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences and Engineering. Undergraduate freshmen entering this curriculum 
should enroll in the College of Engineering undesignated program and indicate SBU as 
their curriculum choice. After successfully completing the Engineering undesignated 
requirements the student will enter the Department of Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering. 

For the engineering program in biological and agricultural engineering, refer to the 
College of Engineering section of the catalog. 

AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

The Agricultural Systems Technology curriculum is intended to provide a broad over- 
view of agricultural systems. The curriculum integrates courses from the physical, biologi- 
cal, and earth sciences with courses in agricultural production, mechanization, and man- 
agement. Graduates are prepared to apply shop, mechanical, and information technology to 
the farm or agribusiness. 



98 



Listed below are the departmental requirements in the agricultural systems technology 
program. 



Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Lanffuages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

Group D Electives 12 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

ENG 331 Commun. for Engr. & Tech 3 

SOC 241 Sociology Agr. and Rural Life 3 

Mathematics and Statistics 
(13 CrediUi) 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry .. 3 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

ST 350 Economics and Business Statistics or 

ST 361 Intro, to Statistics for Engineers 3 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(28 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

PY211 College Physics I 4 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Group A Electives (Biological Science) 4 



Physical Education and Free Electives 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(SH CrediUi) 

BAE 201 Shop Processes and Management 3 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery 3 

BAE 221 Agr. Systems I 3 

BAE 222 Agr. Systems II 3 

BAE 311 Agr. Power and Machinery 3 

BAE (SSC) 323 Water Management 3 

BAE (SSC) 324 Elementary Surveying 1 

BAE 331 Agr. Systems III 2 

BAE 332 Farm Structures 3 

BAE 333 Processing Agr. Products 4 

BAE 343 Agr. Electrification 3 

BAE 344 Circuits and Controls 1 

BAE 441 Agr. Systems IV 3 

BAE 442 Agr. Systems V 2 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 130 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

Bostian Hall (Room 2717) 

Professor C. F. Lytle, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Associate Professors: R. L.Beckmann. Jr. (Botany), M.N. Feaver (Zoology), B.C. Haning(Plant Pathology), B. M. Parker 
(Entomology): Assistant Professor: J. E. Mickle (Botany): Teaching Technicians: C. K. Heinsohn (Zoology), M. T. 
Lassiter (Entomologj'). 

The biological sciences constitute a rapidly developing field offering many challenging 
and rewarding opportunities for well-trained students. The Biological Sciences Interde- 
partmental Program offers a B.S. degree in biological sciences for students seeking a 
comprehensive training in biology and the supporting sciences. 

Many graduates of this program continue further studies in graduate schools in such 
diverse fields as botany, zoology, marine biology, physiology, genetics, biochemistry, bio- 
technology, pharmacology, and microbiology. Others attend professional schools in medi- 
cine, optometry, and veterinary medicine as well as other health-related fields. 

The biological science curriculum provides a modern, flexible undergraduate program 
to prepare students for rewarding careers in research and teaching as well as in business, 
industry, research institutes and governmental agencies. A wide range of career opportun- 
ities are available in technical sales, manufacturing and quality control, environmental 
management, and other positions with pharmaceutical companies, food manufacturers, 
medical laboratories, public utilities, and other industries. 



99 



Biological science majors may elect a general program of study or one of several options 
and emphases includingentomology. microbiology, and nutrition. A joint program with the 
Department of Mathematics and Science Education leads to a double major and a teaching 
certificate. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES CURRICULUM AND CONCENTRATIONS 

GENERAL 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Foreign Language 6 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

Humanities Eleclives 6 

Social Science Electives 6 

Humanities, Soc. Science or Supplimental Group D courses 9 

Biological Sciences (37-38 Credits) 

BCH 451 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

BO 200 Plant Life or BO 400 Plant Diversity 4 

BO (Z0» .360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

BO (Z0» 365 Ecology Lab 1 

BO 421 Plant Pathology or 
B0(Z0)414 Cell Biology or 

ZO 421 Principles of Physiology 3-4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

B.S 490 Senior Seminar 1 

BS 492 External Learning Experience or 

BS 493 S|>ecial Problems in Biological Science or 

ALS 499 Honors Research/Teaching II 3 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 4 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Lab 1 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

ZO201 General Zoology or 

ZO 303 Vertebrate Zoology or 

ZO 402 + ZO 403 Invertebrate Zoology and Lab 4 

NOTE: Students electing ZO 421 or BO (ZO) 414 must also elect either 
ZO 305 Cellular and Animal Physiology Laboratory or 
BCH 452 Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory 2 

Physical Sciences and Mathematics 
(3i-S6 Credits) 

CH lol (ieneral Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chemistrr I and II ^ ^^^^^^.^ ......... S 

MA 131. 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A and B and 7 

BAE 221 Agricultural Systems I; Microcomputer Applications or 
CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Their Uses or 

ST 31 1 Intro, to Statistics 3 

or 

MA 141. 241. 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I. II and III 12 

PY 21 1. 212 College Physics I, II 8 

Physical Education and Electives (25-27 Credits)' 

Restricted Electives from Groups A. B, C. and D 9-11 

Krw Electives j2 

I'E KM) Health & Physical Fitness ...!!!!!!''!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"!!!!!!!!!!!!!!. 1 

Phymcal Education 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

' Group A mcludes the physical and biological sciences; Group B, economics and business management; Group C. applied 
science and technology; Group D, humanities and social sciences. 



100 



ENTOMOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

In addition to the general curriculum for the biological sciences, three additional ento- 
mology electives are required: ENT 312 or ENT 425 and ENT 503, plus three additional 
hours of entomology. For graduation, 130 semester credits hours are required. 

NUTRITION CONCENTRATION 

The nutrition concentration follows the general curricular requirements for the biologi- 
cal sciences program, except that students must take two courses from two departments in 
Group I: BO 200 or BO 400, ZO 201, ZO 303 or 402 or 403; one course from Group II: BO (ZO) 
414. BO 421, ZO 421; and four courses in nutrition (FS 400, NTR 415, NTR 490, and NTR 
516) are specifically required. 

MICROBIOLOGY OPTION 

Along with the general curriculum for the biological sciences, three additional microbi- 
olog>' electives are required: MB 411 and MB 501 are usually recommended. MB 401 is 
required in the BLS curriculum. For graduation, 130 semester credit hours are required. 

(See also Pre-Professional Program in Veterinary Medicine.) 



MINOR IN NUTRITION 

The minor in nutrition will provide knowledge of the principles of nutrition that are 
needed to formulate balanced diets and to evaluate information and policies concerning 
foods and dietary practicers. Students may select courses to emphasize human or animal 
nutrition or a combination of these. For additional information consult Nutrition Program, 
220B Polk Hall (737-2763). 



BOTANY 

Gardner Hall (Room 2214) 

Professor E. D. Seneca, Head of Department 

Professor C. G. Van Dyke, Undergraduate Coordinator and Graduate Administrator 

University Research Professor: W. F. Thompson 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: R. L. Beckmann 

Professors: C. E. Anderson, U. Blum. R. J. Downs. R. C. Files, J. W. Hardin. W, W, Heck ( USDA), R. L. Mott, H . E. Pattee 
(USDA), J. R. Troyer. T. R, Wentworth. A. M. Witherspoon: Professors Emeriti: D. B. Anderson. G. R. Noggie, H. T, 
Scofield. L. A. Whitford; Associate Professors: W. F, Boss. J. M. Stucky. J. F. Thomas: Assistant Professors: R. S. Boston, 
J. M. Burkholder, J. E. M'\ck\e. Adjunct Assistant Professors:!). E. Blume, R. A. Linthurst: Teaching Technician: D. S. 
Wright: Research Associates: G. C. Allen. F. L. Booker, W. H. Gross, G. E. Hall, P. Venkatasubbaiah. M. J. White, D. W. 
Wolff: >l.s\wfja?('A/em6er.so/MpFac"/^(/.E.C.Sisler (Biochemistry), J. M.Anderson(USDA).K.O.Burkey (USDA). S. 
C. Huber (USDA). T. W. Rufty, Jr. (USDA). H. Seltmann (USDA) (Crop Science), D. E. Moreland (USDA) (Crop 
Science, Forestry), H. V. Amerson (Forestry), M. M. Goodman (Crop Science. Statistics. Genetics). L. B. Crowder 
(Zoologj). 

The instructional program provides classroom, laboratory, and field experience in the 
major areas of plant science. Undergraduates majoring in botany are given a broad 
background in the humanities and physical sciences and are encouraged to participate in 
independent study in the senior year. Majors, as preprofessionals in the plant sciences, are 
prepared for advanced study in botany and other biological fields, as well as in the applied 

101 



plant sciences such as horticulture, crop science, plant pathology, resource management 
and environmental biologj'. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The undergraduate degree is an excellent preprofessional degree in the plant sciences. 
Many majors continue with graduate studies: see list of graduate degrees. After obtaining a 
graduate degree, the undergraduate major will be qualified for teaching positions in 
community and junior colleges, colleges and universities, for research positions in federal 
and state government laboratories and in private industry. 

Research technician positions in many other life science areas in governmental and 
industrial laboratories are also career possibilities. The field of biotechnology provides 
additional technical opportunities. Field botanists and naturalists find employment in state 
and national park systems and nature interpretation programs. 

CURRICULUM IN BOTANY 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in botany is offered under the science 
curriculum of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. See the freshman year program 
listed. See also other basic requirements listed. 

The Bachelor of Science degree with double concentration — one in economics, English, 
history, philosophy or political science, and another in botany— is available in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences. For details, refer to section on College of Humanities and 
Social Sciences. 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languaqex (12 Credit.i) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

ENG;i33 Commun. for Science & Res 3 

LanfTuafre or Communication Elective 3 

Hiimanitiex and Social Sciences 
(■-iJ Credits) 

PHI 20.") Problems and Types of Philosophy or 

PH 1 .3:^3 Theory of Knowledge or 

PHI 340 Philosophy of Science or 

HI 321 Ancient and Medieval Science or 

H I 322 Rise of Modern Science 3 

Electives from Group D- 18 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(.il Creditt) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 (Jeneral Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 1 1 1 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry . . 3 
MA 131 Analylic(;eometry and Calculus A' 4 

PY 211. 212 College Physics I, II 8 

ZO 201 General Zoology or 

Z() 302 Invertebrate Zoology or 

ZO 402 + 403 Vertebrate Zoology and Lab 4 



Restricted Elect ires from Groups A and C 
(22 Credits) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry' 4 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming 3 

GN 412 Elementary Genetics Laboratory 1 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Three credit hours of 200 level or above course 

with the following abbreviations CS. FS. HS and 

PP or FW(ZO) 221 or FW(ZO) 353 3 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(28 Credits) 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

BO (ZO) 365 Ecologv Lab 1 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 4 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 4 

BO 413 Introductory Plant Anatomy 4 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 4 

Physical Education and Free Electires 
(16 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 12 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 131- 

'The proposed program meets the minimum require- 
ments for graduate work: however, additional courses 
are encouraged in mathematical and physical sciences 
for students who are planning advanced study. See 
adviser. 

''Completion of one course in literature is required. 



102 



I 



MINOR IN BOTANY 

The 15 credit minor in Botany is offered to any undergraduate degree student interested 
in gaining a basic knowledge of plants. It is intended both to complement other curricula 
that are related to the plant sciences and to give students a basic appreciation of plants. 
Such appreciation includes an understanding of plant-human interactions, plant structure 
and how plants function, plant identification, and the pervasive roles of plants and plant 
products in human society. It is not intended to prepare students for a professional career in 
Botany, and additional courses are recommended for students who plan graduate work in 
the plant sciences. 



CONSERVATION 

(Also see Forest Resources.) 
Williams (Room 2321) and Biltmore (Room 2028) Halls 

Associate Professor H. J. Kleiss, Major Adviser, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 
Professor A. W. Cooper, Major Adviser, College of Forest Resources 

Conservation is the wise use, perpetuation, or improvement of natural resources, for the 
long-time benefit of society. This baccalaureate degree program is offered jointly by the 
Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences and Forest Resources. Faculty members in 
several departments of the two colleges are directly involved in the varied aspects of natural 
resource management. 

Rapid urbanization and industrialization concomitant with population growth and 
changes in lifestyles are bringing increased pressures on the use of land for providing food, 
water, fiber, wood and recreation. These trends present challenges to resource managers 
who must be well trained in the basic concepts of several disciplines in order to apply a 
conservation philosophy to many of our current resource problems. 

CONSERVATION CURRICULUM 

Students may enroll in either Agriculture and Life Sciences or Forest Resources, depend- 
ing on their primary area of interest in conservation. The freshman common core of courses 
for either college is acceptable. All students take a prescribed core of subjects in conserva- 
tion plus specified courses in one of five concentrations: soil conservation; environmental 
technology: environmental education: natural resource management and administration; 
communications. A dual degree program involving the conservation curriculum with 
another curriculum, e.g., science education, recreation, agronomy, forestry is very feasible 
and highly recommended. 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

CrediUf 

ALS 10.3 Introductory Topics in ALS' 1 

Lariffuages (12 Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

ENG 333 Commun. for Science & Res 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(^1 Credits) 

EB212 Econ. of Agriculture 3 

PS 201 Introduction to American Government .... 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Eiectives 12 



Physical and Biological Sciences (2H Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 111 Precaiculus Algebra and Trig^)nometry ..3 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

ZO 201 General Zoology or 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 



103 



Phynieal Education and Electives 
tn CredUs) 

PK UK) Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 10 

Drpatimrnlal Requirements and Eleeth'es 
(Sli Credits) 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

BO (ZO) 366 Ecoloffy Lab 1 

FOR 252 FundamenUls of Forest Mgmt 3 

FOR 401 For. Hydro. & Watershed Mgmt 4 

FOR 472 Renew Resource Pol. & Mffint 4 

MEA 110 Physical Geolojfy Lab 1 

MEA 120 Elements of Physical Geology 2 

RRA241 Natural Resource Recreation or 

RRA :150 Outdoor Recreation Management 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

ST 311 Introduction to Sutistics 3 

ZO (FW) 221 Conser. of Nat. Resources 3 

ZO (FW) 353 Wildlife Management or 

ZO (FW) 420 Fishery Science 3 

Biological Science Electives 6 

Conservation Electives ■ ■ 16 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 131 
SOIL CONSERVATION CONCENTRATION 

PMUl Integrated Pest Management 1 

SSC(BAE)323 Water Management 3 

SSC 361 Non-Agri. Land Use & Management ..3 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 4 

SSC 461 Soil Phy. Prop. & Plant Growth 3 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science 1 

15 

ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 
CONCENTRATION' 

BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste 

Management' 3 

FS(MB)405 Food Microbiology 3 

SSC 361 Non-Agricultural Land Use and 

Management 3 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 4 

Z0 419 Limnology 3 



16 



NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND 
ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION* 

EB 307 Business Law I 3 

EB 410 Public Finance 3 

EB 436 Environmental Economics 3 

FOR 491 Spec. Topics in For. & Related Nat. 

Resources (1-4) or 

PS 491 Internship in Political Science or 

SSC 490 Sr. Seminar in Soil Science 1 

MEA 200 Intro, to the Marine Environment .... 3 
PS 312 Introduction to Public Administration ..3 

16-19 

ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION 
CONCENTRATIONS 

ED 203 Intro, to Teach. Math. & Sci 3 

ED 296D Special Topics in Science Education . . 1 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science 3 

Electives 9 

16 

COMMUNICATIONS CONCENTRATION^ 

ENG 214 Copyediting 3 

ENG 215 Prin. of News Article Writing 3 

COM (SP) 112 Basic Prin. of Interpersonal Comm. ...3 
COM (SP) 201 Theories of Persuasive 

Communication 3 

COM (SP) 298 Special Proj. in Speech Commun. or 
FOR 491 Spec. Topics in For. & Relat. 
Resources or 

SSC 490 Senior Seminar in Soil Science 1-4 

Elective 3 

16-19 

' For students enrolled in College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences: students enrolled in College of Forest Re- 
sources not taking ALS 103 will increase free electives 
by one hour. 

-MB 401 is a required biological sciences elective. 

•'or BAE (SSC) 321 

*PS 202 and EB 301 are required Group D electives. 

'PHI 304 is a required Group D elective. 

*SOC 302 is a required Group D elective. 



CROP SCIENCE 

Williams HalMRoom 2210) 

Professor i. C. Wynne, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor J. M. DiPaola, Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AKO RESEARCH 

Distinguished University Professor: M. M. Goodman 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: D. A. Emery. W. T. Fike, Jr., R. P. 
Patterson 

William Neal Reynolds Professors: M. M. Goodman, E. A. Wernsman 



104 



Professors: J. C. Burns (USDA). J. W. Burton (USDA). B. E. Caldwell, D. S. Chamblee. H. D. Coble. F. T. Corbin, H. D. 
Gross. S. C. Huber (USDA). R. C. Long:. D. E. Moreland (USDA). H. Seltmann (USDA). H. T. Stalker. D. H. Timothy. J. 
B. Weber. W. W. Weeks. R. F. Wilson (USDA). A. D. Worsham; Adjittict Proft'ssors: D. G. Oblinger. D. T. Patterson. G. 
M. Werner: Professors Emeriti: C. A. Brim. J. F. Chaplin. W. A. Cope. D. U. Gerstel. W. B. Gilbert. W. C. Gregory. G. R. 
Gwynn.P. H. Harvey. G.C. Klingman. J. A. Lee. R. L. Lovvorn. R. P. Moore. L. L. Phillips. J. C. Rice. D. L.Thompson. J. 
A. Wevbrew: Associate Professors: J. M. Anderson (USDA). D. T. Bowman. K. 0. Burkey (USDA). T. E. Carter 
(USDA). D. A. Danehower. E. L. Fiscus(USDA). D. S. Fisher (USDA). T. G. Isleib. R. D. Keys, J. E. Miller (USDA). J. 
P. Murphy. C. H. Peacock. R. C. Rufty. T. W. Rufty. Jr. (USDA). G. G. Wilkerson: Adjunct Associate Professor: P. S. 
Zorner: Assistant Professors: S. H. Kay. P. Kwanyueh (USDA). M. G. Redinbaugh (USDA). S. M. Reed (USDA). P. H. 
Sisco (USDA). V. A. Sisson (USDA). A. K. Weissinger. R. Wells: Associate Members of the Faculty: S. M. Schneider 
(Biomathematics. Plant Pathology). T. J. Sheets (Entomology, Horticultural Science). C. T. Young (Food Science). 

EXTENSION 

Philip Morris Professors: W. K. Collins, G. F. Peedin 

Professor W. K. Collins, Associate Head & Specialist-in-Charge, Crop Science Extension 

Professors: E. J. Dunphy, J. T. Green. Jr., W. M. Lewis, F. W. McLaughlin. J. P. Mueller. G. A. Sullivan, A. C. York; 
Professors Emeriti: R. R. Bennett. C. T. Blake. S. H. Dobson. S. N. Hawks. G. L. Jones. A. Perry. A. D. Stuart: Associate 
Professors:]. R. Anderson, Jr., A. H. Bruneau, R. L. Davis. R. E. Jarrett. H. M. Linker. W. D. Sm\th; Associate Professor 
Emeritm:W. G. Toomey: Assistant Professors: J. M. Ferguson: Extension Specialists: D. W. Daniel, D. S. Guthrie, G. E. 
Martin. Jr.. F. H. Yelverton. 

Crop scientists seek to improve the productivity, profitability and quality of our major 
food, feed, and fiber crops; enhance the quality of our turf and vegetable cover, and improve 
the nutrient and economic health of our world. The Crop Science four-year undergraduate 
program is offered within the Agronomy curriculum and administered jointly by the Crop 
Science and Soil Science departments. Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree 
under the technology curriculum with a major in Agronomy. See Agronomy curriculum. 

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Agronomy major graduates find employment as consultants, extension agents, farm 
managers, golf course superintendents, landscape specialists, research scientists, seed 
production specialists, sod production specialists, soil survey specialists, soil conservation- 
ists, technical sales representatives, and waste management specialists. The Agronomy 
curriculum can be found in this catalog under College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. For 
Crop Science graduate programs, see the Graduate catalog. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

Students may earn a Bachelor of Science degree under the technology curriculum with a 
major in agronomy. The agronomy option is administered jointly by the Departments of 
Crop Science and Soil Science. See agronomy curriculum. 



DAIRY SCIENCE 

(See Animal Science.) 



105 



ENTOMOLOGY 

Gardner Hall (Room 2301) 

Professor J. D. Harper. Head of the Department 

Professor J. R. Meyer. Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: C. G. Wright 

Pro/riwyn: R. C. Axtell. J. R. Bradley. Jr.. W. M. Brooks. M. H. Farrier. F. L. Gould. F. P. Hain. G. G. Kennedy. R. J. Kuhr. 
H. H. Neunzitt. G. C. Rock. R. E. Stinner: Adjunct Profexxor: F. L. Hastings: Profeasom Emeriti: W. V. Campbell. K. L. 
Kniifht. W. J. Mistric. Jr.. H. B. Moore. R. L. Rabb. C. F. Smith. D. A. Young; An.iociate Professors: L. L. Deitz. D. M. 
Jackson (USDA». E. P. Lampert. B. M. Parker. R. M. Roe: Adjunct Associate Professor: C. Y. Kawanishi: Assistant 
Proffiworx: M. E. Barbercheck. D. W. Keever (USDA): Adjunct Assistant Professor: K. J. Giroux: Research Associates: 
S. P. Cook. M. E. Derrick. M. G. Fletcher. K. J. Patel. L. R. Wilhoit: Teaching Technician: M. T. Lassiter: Associate 
Memhem of the Faculty: W. C. Dauterman (Toxicology). B. C. Haning (Plant Pathologj'). H. M. Linker (Crop Science). 

EXTENSION 

Associate Professor P. S. Southern, Specialist-in-Charge 
Philip Morris Professor: J. W. Van Duyn 

Profeiaor»:i.'V. Ambrose. C. S. Apperson. J. S. Bacheler. J. R. Baker. K. A. Sorensen: Professors Emeriti: G. D.Jones. R. L. 
Robertson: /IxKoria/f Professors:i.J. Arends. R. L. Brandenberg, R. C. }i\\lTna.n; Assistant Professor: J. F. Walgenbach: 
Extension SpecialisU- S. B. Bambara. D. L. Stephan, S. J. Toth. M. G. Waldvogel. 

Undergraduate instruction in entomology is designed to provide introductory and 
advanced courses in the basic science of entomology and on the management of beneficial 
and pest insects. These courses serve students majoring in biological sciences, agronomy, 
horticultural science, agricultural education, and forestry. They also provide fundamental 
training for graduate study in entomology (See listing of graduate degrees). 

OPPORTUNITIES 

For graduates with advanced degrees in entomology, opportunities include research 
teaching, and extension positions in universities: research, development, production, con- 
trol, and sales positions in private industries; consultative positions in pest management: 
and research and regulatory positions with state and federal agencies. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULUM 

There is no entomolog>' undergraduate major. Those students with a primary interest in 
entomology who plan to go on to graduate studies are advised to take the general biological 
sciences curriculum and develop a strong knowledge base in the basic biological sciences. 
Electives from entomology courses may be selected. 



FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 

(;ardncr Hall (Room 2115) 

Professor R L. Noble. Undergraduate Coordinator 

(See curriculum in Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences under Department of Zoology.) 



106 



FOOD SCIENCE 

Schaub Food Science Building (Room 100) 
Professor D. R. Lineback, Head of the Department 
Professor V. A. Jones, Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

William Neal Reynolds Professor: H. E. Swaisgood 

ProffSKors: H. R. Ball. Jr.. D. E. Carroll, Jr.. G. L. Catignani. Jr.. H. P. FlemingdJSDA), D, D. Hamann. H. M. Hassan. T. 
R. Klaenhammer. T. C. Lanier. R. F. McFeeters(USDA). J. L. Oblinger. K. R. Swartzel, L. G. Turner. W. M. Walter. Jr. 
(USDA). C. T. Younfr; Adjunct Pro/r.s-.sor.s; J. P. Adams. N. B. Webb; Pro/cs.sor.s Emcrili: L. W. Aurand. T. A. Bell. T. N. 
Blumer. H. B. Craig. M. W. Hoover. A. E. Purcell. W. M. Roberts. M. L. Speck. F. G. Warren: ^l.s.sofia/c Professors: E. A. 
Foegeding. P. M. Foegeding. A. P. Hansen. D. K. Larick. S. J. Schwartz, B. W. Sheldon: Assistant Professors: J. C. 
Allen. L. C. Boyd: Research Associates: D. K. Arora. H. Chen. G. S. Ganesan. A. Kumar. S. Oh. C. J. Soodeen: Associate 
Members of Facutty: H. R. Horton (Biochemistry): C.J. Lackey (Foods and Nutrition): H. E. Pattee( Botany): N. F. Tope 
(Foods and Nutrition). 

EXTENSION 

Associate Professor D. R. Ward, Specialist In Charge 

Professors: R. E. Carawan, M. E. Gregory: Professors Emeriti: J. A. Christian. E. S. Cofer. L D. Jones. N. C. Miller. Jr.. F. 
R. Tarver. Jr.. F. B. Thomas: Associate Professors: D. H. Pilkington. J. E. Rushing: Specialist: D. P. Green. 

The Department of Food Science provides undergraduate and graduate programs for the 
application and integration of chemistry, biology, and engineering to the development, 
processing, packaging, quality control, distribution and utilization of foods. The depart- 
ment maintains modern fully-equipped laboratories for teaching and research in the 
disciplines of food microbiology, food chemistry/biochemistry, food engineering, and nutri- 
tion; and the product areas of dairy, fruit, meats, poultry, seafood, and vegetable products. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Increasing consumer demands for greater varieties of nutritious and convenience foods 
of uniformly high quality create many varied career opportunities in the food and allied 
industries. 

Career opportunities in food industries are: management, research and development, 
process supervision, quality control, procurement, distribution, sales and merchandising. 
Positions include sales and services in allied industries, consulting and trade association 
activities and promotional and educational services. 

Food Science graduates hold teaching, research and extension positions with colleges and 
universities. Governmental agencies employ food scientists whose work is directed toward 
research, regulatory control and the development of food standards. 

The food industry provides both merit and financial need scholarships to encourage 
students preparing for careers in food science. Phi Tau Sigma Honor Society invites 
outstanding seniors to membership, and all students are encouraged to participate in the 
Food Science Club, a student branch of the Institute of Food Technologists. 

CURRICULA IN FOOD SCIENCE 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in food science is offered through curricula 
with a science emphasis or a technology emphasis. The science program is designed for 
students with interest in graduate school or for those desiring more rigorous science courses 
for technical careers in the food industry. Students more interested in business opportuni- 
ties for technically trained individuals find the technology program permits greater flexi- 
bility in complementing food science coursework with business and agricultural commod- 
ity courses. 

See listing of graduate degrees offered. 



107 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Creditx 
ALS 103 Inlroduclory Topics in ALS 1 

Ixinguagex {li C reditu) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

LanKuaire Elective 6' 

Humnnitiex and Social Sciences 
HI Credit*) 

Electives 21' 

MathematicK and StatiMicx (IS Creditg) 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra & TrifTonometry ... 3 

MA \.i\ Analytic Geometry & Calc. A 4 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B 3 

ST 31 1 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Chi-nimtry (19 Credits) 

BCH 451 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

Biological Sciences (H Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 



Physics (8 Crediti) 

PY211 College Physics I 4 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

Food Science (31 Credits) 

FS 201 Food Science and the Consumer 3 

FS 331 Food Engineering 3 

FS400 Principlesof Human Nutrition 3 

FS402 Food Chemistry 3 

FS 403 Food Analysis 3 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology 3 

FS 421 Food Preservation 3 

FS(ANS. PO)322 Muscle Foods and Eggs or 
FS(ANS)324 Milk & Dairy Products or 
FS 423 Muscle Food Technology or 

FS 425 Processing Dairy Products 3 

FS490 Food Science Seminar 1 

Food Science Electives 6 

Physical Education and Free Electitvs 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . 130 



'Any English, foreign language or communication course may be used as language elective. A literature course or 
200-level foreign language course must be included in the curriculum. 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

COM(SP)110 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

Mathematics (10 Credits) 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry .. 3 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math. Appl. or 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B 3 

.MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A 4 

Chemistry (12-16 Credits) 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry 11 or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistr)- 4 

CH 220 Introduction to Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I and 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4-8 

Biological Sciences (H Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

'[)ependent on whether CH 220 or CH 221-223 and PY 221 or PY 21 1-212 are elected. 



Physics 
(5 Credits) 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Groups A. B, C Electives 
(10-17 Crediti)' 

Electives 10-17 

Food Science (27 Credits) 

FS201 Food Science & the Consumer 3 

FS 331 Food Engineering 3 

FS402 Food Chemistry 3 

FS 403 Food Analysis 3 

FS (MB) 405 Food Microbiology 3 

FS 416 Quality Control of Food Products 3 

FS 42 1 Food Preservation 3 

FS 490 Food Science Seminar 1 

Food Science Elective 2 

Food Processing Elective (FS 322. 324. 

423 or 425) 3 

Physical Education and Free Electiivs 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 130 



108 



MINOR IN FOOD SCIENCE 

The minor in Food Science is designed to provide important food science principles and 
concepts to students seeking to improve their understanding of food and its manufacture 
and, especially, to those seeking employment as chemists, microbiologists, engineers, nutri- 
tionists, business specialists, or technical writers in the food and pharmaceutical industry. 
One introductory course (FS 201) is required, and 12 additional hours at the 300 or 400 level 
may be selected to complement a variety of majors. 



GENETICS 

Gardner Hall (Room 3513) 

Professor D. F. Matzinger, Interim Department Head 

Professor W. H. McKenzie, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: C. S. Levings 

Distinguished University Professor: 3 . G. Scandal ios 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: W. H. McKenzie 

Professors: W. R. Atchley. W. D. Hanson, W. E. Kloos, R. H. Moll, G. Namkoong (USFS), C. W. Stuber (USDA). A. C. 
Triantaphyllou: Adjunct Professor: M. D. Chilton: Professors Emeriti: C. H. Bostian. D. S. Grosch, T. J. Mann. L. E. 
Mettler: Associate Professors: S. E. Curtis. T. H. Emigh, T. F. C. Mackay, S. L. Spiker; Assij<tant Professors: M. T. 
Andrews. M. A. Conkling. J. W. Mahaffey: Research Associates: R. E. Cannon. D. E. Cowley. R. F. Lyman, M. E. 
Williams.J.D. Williamson; A.ssooa^p Members o/MfFacw/fi/.H. E.Schaffer( Academic Computing). E.J. Eisen.C.L. 
Markert. B. T. McDaniel. R. M. Fetters. 0. W. Robison (Animal Science); F. B. Armstrong(Biochemistry); R. S. Boston, 
W. F. Thompson (Botany); E. A. Wernsman, (Crop Science); M. M. Goodman (Crop Science. Statistics, Botany); D. H. 
Timothy (Crop Science); C. C. Cockerham. J. 0. Rawlings. B. S. Weir (Statistics); R. R. Sederoff (Biochemistry. 
Forestry); K. G. Tatchell (Microbiology); J. L. Apple (Plant Pathology). 

The genetics faculty offers instruction at advanced undergraduate and graduate levels. 
The undergraduate courses are designed to support other departments, giving students a 
background in genetics. Since there is no genetics baccalaureate program, interested 
undergraduates are encouraged to pursue a biological sciences program. The graduate 
program is designed to train scientists for research and teaching careers in basic genetics 
and in its application in plant and animal breeding. See listing of graduate degrees offered. 

MINOR IN GENETICS 

The academic minor in Genetics is intended to provide the undergraduate student with a 
strong preparation in the principles of genetics in order to complement their academic 
major. This minor is appropriate for (but not limited to) students with majors in Animal 
Science, Biochemistry, Botany, Conservation. Crop Science, Fisheries and Wildlife Sci- 
ences, Horticultural Science, Microbiology, Poultry Science and Zoolo^. Ten hours of 
required courses and 6 hours of electives are necessary to complete the minor. 



109 



HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

Kilgore Hall (Room 114) 

Professor T. J. Monaco, Head of the Department 

Urtitrer B. H. Lane, Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: B. H. Lane 

frvfrxKom: J . R. Ballinfrton. Jr.. F. A. Blazich. W. W. Collins. A. A. De Hertogh. P. R. Fantz. R. A. Larson. P. V, Nelson. D. 
M. Pharr. J. C. Raulston. C. R. Unrath. T. C. Wehner. D.J. Werner. E. Young: Adjunct Professors: P. L. Accatino(Peru). 
D. T. Patterson (Duke University). R. L. Sawyer (Peru): Professors Emeriti: W. E. Baliinger. F. D. Cochran. F. L. 
Haynes. Jr.. J. M. Jenkins. T. R. Konsler. C. H. Miller. D. T. Pope: Associate Professors: T. E. Bilderback. S. M. 
Blankenship. W. C. Fonteno. R. G. Gardner. W. R. Henderson, L. E. Hinesley. W. E. Hooker. M. M. Peet: Adjunct 
AMociatf Professor: P. S. Zorner (Myeogen Corp.): Adjunct Associate Professor: D. R. Carlson: Associate Professor 
Kmrnlus: D. C. Zeiger: Assistant Professors: J. D. Burton. J. M. Davis. T. G. Ranney. S. L. Warren: Lecturer: M. E. 
Traer: Research Associates: N. L. Hubbard. W. K. Kroen. M. J. Wannamaker; Associate Members of the Faculty: D. E. 
Carroll. Jr. (Food Science). R. J. Downs. R. L. Mott (Botany). R. H. Moll (Genetics). T. J. Sheets (Toxicology. Crop 
Science). R. J. Volk (Soil Science). 

EXTENSION 

Professor M. A. Powell, Jr., Extension Specialist, In Charge 

Professors: C. M. Mainland. D. C. Sanders. W. A. Skroch. J. H. Wilson. Jr.. L. G. Wilson: Professors Emeriti: A. A. 
Banadyga. J. F. Brooks. Jr.. H. M.Covington. J. H. Harris. G. R. Hughes, M. H. Kolbe. J. W. hove: Associate Professors: 
K. B. Perry. E. B. Poling: Associate Professors Emeriti: T. F. Cannon. W. W. Reid: Assistant Professors: D. A. Bailey. D. 
W. Monks. M. L. Parker. J. R. Schultheis: Extension Specialists: L. Bass. R. E. Bir. G. L. Johnson. 

Horticulture is a dynamic segment of agriculture. The development, growth, distribu- 
tion, and utilization of fruits, vegetables, flowers and ornamental plants plus the arts of 
floral design and landscaping enrich our lives with nutritious foods and more attractive 
surroundings. North Carolina's varied climatic conditions favor the production of a wide 
variety of horticultural crops on a commercial scale as well as the development of parks and 
gardens. The population and amount of industry in the state are increasing, and with them 
the use of ornamental plants. Designers skilled in residential and commercial landscaping, 
interior plantscaping, and plant maintenance are in demand. All this in turn has created a 
growth in interest in horticulture education. 

Undergraduate programs in horticultural science offer a broad based education in 
physical and biological sciences and a sound cultural background. Students can concen- 
trate in areas of fruit and vegetable science, floriculture, woody ornamental plant science, 
landscape horticulture, or pursue a general approach which encompasses all the special- 
ties. They are prepared for graduate study or for diverse professional service. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Horticulture graduates fill positions in production, processing, sales and service. Among 
these are county extension agents: vocational agricultural teachers; landscapers and land- 
scape contractors: farm operators: orchard, nursery, greenhouse and flower shop man- 
agers; research, production and promotional specialists with commercial seed, floral, 
fertilizer, chemical and food companies; inspectors and quality control technologists; 
USDA specialists and as leaders in other phases of agricultural and industrial develop- 
ments. The student may also prepare for a career in research, teaching, extension, etc. in 
horticulture. 

CURRICULA IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in horticultural science can be earned in 
either science or technology— offered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. 
Under the science curriculum, specialized education is offered in fruit and vegetable crops. 



110 



p 



floriculture, and ornamental horticulture. Under the technolo^ curriculum, education is 
offered in landscape horticulture, or in a general approach which includes all the commod- 
ity areas. 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (l.i Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
Group D (21 Credit.'i) 

Electives (Incl. EB 212) 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(31-32 Credits) 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

MA 1 11 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry ... 3 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math. Appl. or 

MA 121 Elementsof Calculus, or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A 4-3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Physical Education And Free Electives 
(16-17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 12-132 

Group A and C Courses' 
(21 Credits) 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

ENT 312 Intro, to Economic Entomology 3 

ENT 425 General Entomology (HG) 3 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 3 

HS 301 Plant Propagation (FL,FV,HG,OH) 4 

HS 411 Nursery Management (HG.LH) 3 

HS 440 Greenhouse Management (HG) 3 

HS 441 Floriculture I (FL) 3 

HS471 Tree & Grounds Maintenance (LH) 4 

PP 315 Plant Diseases 4 

SSC 341 Soil Fertility & Fertilizers (FV.OH) 3 

'Students entering the curriculum after spring 1990 may choose from either HG-General Horticulture or LH-Landscape 
Horticulture. The concentrations FV-Fruits & Vegetables, FL-Floriculture. and OH-Ornamental are being phased out 
through 1/95. 

-Students choosing GN 411 (4) over GN 301 (3) have a free elective requirement of 12 hrs. instead of 13 hrs. 

^Hours Required for Graduation in LH are 137. 



Departmental Requirement'i and Electives 
(2I>-:U Credits) 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 
GN411 Principles of Genetics 

(FL.FV.HG.OH) 3-4^ 

HS211 Ornamental Plants (LH.OH)(HG or) 3 

HS212 Ornamental Plants II (FL,HG.LH,OH) ...3 

HS342 Landscape Horticulture (LH.OH) 3 

HS 400 Residential Landscape (LH) 6 

HS 411 Nursery Management (OH) 3 

HS 416 Princ. Ornamental Plant Design or 

DN 433 Native Plants in Environ. Design (LH) ... 3 

HS421 Tree Fruit Production (FV)(HG or) 3 

HS 422 Small Fruit Production (FV,HG) 3 

HS 431 Vegetable Production (HG.FV) 4 

HS 440 Greenhouse Management (FL) 3 

HS442 Floriculture II (FL.HG) 3 

HS 471 Tree and Grounds Maintenance (HG.OH) 4 

HS 490 Horticultural Science Seminar 1 

HS(FS)462 Postharvest Physiology (HG) 3 

LAR 234 Intro, to Environmental Design (LH) .... 3 

LAR 400 Intermed. Landscape Arch. Desg. (LH) 6 

LAR 430 Site Planning (LH) 3 

LAR 457 Landsc. Mat'ls. & Construct. I (LH) 3 

EB or ACC Elective (FL.FV.OH) 6 

Departmental Electives (FL 7-8) (FV-3-4) (OH-1) 
HG — Select one 3 cr. course from the following: 

HS 211 Ornamental Plants I 

HS 212 Ornamental Plants II 

HS 342 Landscape Horticulture 

HS371 Interior Plantscapes 

HS 421 Tree Fruit Production 

HS 422 Small Fruit Production 

HS441 Floriculture I 

HS 531 Physiology of Landscape Plants 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 130^ 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Langitages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective/Foreign Language 3 



Humanities and Social Sciences- 
Group D (21 Credits) 

Electives (Incl. EB 212) 21 



111 



Departmental Requirements and Electii'es 
(26 Credits) 



BO 200 
BS 100 
CH 101 
CH 107 
MA 111 
MA 131 
PY221 



GN411 
GN412 
HS201 
HS211 
HS212 
HS301 
HS411 
HS421 
HS422 
HS431 
HS 440 
HS441 
HS442 
HS471 
HS490 



Ph^ieal and Biological Sciences 
as Crrdits) 

Plant Life 4 

(ieneral Biolojfy * 

General Chemistry I 4 

Principles of Chemistry 4 

Precalculus Alirebra and Trigonometry . . 3 

Analytic Geometry & Calc. A 4 

Collejfe Physics 5 

Phyfical Education and Free Eleetir-es 
(16 Credits) 

n ''''h& Physical Fitness 1 

i aion Electives 3 

F^ - 12 

(rroup A and C Courses 
(26 Credits) 

BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 3 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 4 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chemistry I. 11 8 

ENT 312 Intro, to Economic Entomology 3 

PP 315 Principles of Plant Pathology 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

FV — Fruits and Vegetables. OH— Ornamentals. FL— Floriculture 

MINOR IN HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

The academic minor in Horticultural Science is offered to students who desire a strong 
foundation in the principles of horticultural science. Students may choose to enhance their 
own major by selecting courses in a specialized area of horticulture such as fruits and 
vegetables, ornamentals, floriculture, or landscape horticulture, or they may pursue a more 
general approach to the entire field of study. 



The Principles of Genetics 4 

Genetics Lab 1 

Principles of Horticulture 3 

Ornamental Plants I (OH) 3 

Ornamental Plants U (OH.FL) 3 

Plant Propagation (OH.FL) 4 

Nursery Management (OH) 3 

Tree Fruit Production (FV) 3 

Small Fruit Production (FV) 3 

Vegetable Production (FV) 4 

Greenhouse Management (FL) 3 

Floriculture I (FL) 3 

Floriculture II (FL) 3 

Tree and Grounds Maintenance (OH) 4 

Hort. Science Seminar 1 

HS (FS) 462 Post Harvest Physiology (FV) 3 

Departmental Elective (FV-4)(FL-1) variable 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 130 



INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY PROGRAM 

Patterson Hall (Room 115) 

Professor J. L. Oblinger, Associate Dean and Director of Academic Affairs 

The individualized study program entails a curriculum planned by the student with the 
assistance of a faculty advisory committee. Interested students are requested to follow 
details of the program through the Director of Academic Affairs. 115 Patterson Hall. 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Gardner Hall (Room 1627) 

Professor G. C. Miller, Undergraduate Coordinator 

(See Scienct Program in Medical Technology under Department of Zoology.) 



112 



MICROBIOLOGY 

Gardner Hall (Room 4515) 

Professor L. W. Parks, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor G. H. Luginbuhl, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Professors: P. E. Bishop (USDA), W. J. Dobrogosz. G. H. Elkan, J. J. Perry: Adjunct Professors: C. R. Bunn. W. R. 
Finnerty. R. E. Kanich; Associate Professors: J. M. McKenzie. Jr.. T. Melton, K. G. Tatchell: Adjunct Associate 
Professor: K. T. Kleeman: Assistant Professors: S. M. Laster. E. S. Miller; Adjunct Assistant Professor: W. S. Dallas. S. 
H. Shore; Research Associates: J. N. Lee, R. T. Lorenz, S. Thompson-Jaeger; Teachiny Technicians: V. M. Knowlton, C. 
S. Riehter; Associate Members of the Faculty: J. C. Leece (Animal Science); P. M. Foegeding, H. M. Hassan, T. R. 
Klaenhammer (Food Science): W. E. Kloos (Genetics); P. B. Hamilton (Poultry Science): F. J. Fuller (Veterinary 
Medicine). 

The microbiology program provides basic preparation for professional microbiologists, a 
microbiology background for students in other sciences, and an awareness of the microbial 
world as it relates to our daily lives for non-science majors. 

Microbiology is concerned with the growth and development, physiology, classification, 
ecology, genetics and other aspects of the life processes of an array of microscopic, generally 
single-celled, organisms. These organisms frequently serve as model systems for elucida- 
tion of fundamental processes that are common to all living cells. Most of the major 
discoveries that have produced the spectacular advances in biology during the past decade 
have resulted from studies of microbial systems. Future developments in biotechnology, 
production of food and fuel, and human health, will rely heavily on understanding micro- 
bial processes. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Microbiologists are employed in university, governmental and industrial research labo- 
ratories, diagnostic and control laboratories, teaching, and technical sales and service 
positions. 

CURRICULUM 

There is a microbiology option under the biological sciences curriculum. (See curriculum 
under biological sciences.) This requires three courses (9 credits) in microbiology in addi- 
tion to MB 401, which is part of the basic biological sciences requirement. (See listing of 
graduate degree programs.) 



PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Gardner Hall (Room 2518) 

Professor L. F. Grand, Interim Head of the Department and Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

University Distinguished Scholar: A. Kelman 

Professors: J. L. Apple. K. R. Barker. D. F. Bateman, D. M. Benson, M. K. Beute, J. M. Davis. E. Echandi. G. V. Gooding. 
Jr.. A. S. Heagle (USDA). J. S. Huang. W, L. Klarman, L. T. Lucas, C. E. Main. R. D. Milholland, J. W. Moyer. G. A. 
Payne. R. A. Reinert (USDA), H. W, Spurr, Jr. (USDA), T. B. Sutton. H. H. Triantaphyllou; Professors Emeriti: R. 
Aycock, C. N. Clayton. D. E. Ellis. T. T. Hebert. G. B. Lucas, J. P. Ross. J. N. Sasser, D. L. Strider, F. L. Wellman. N. N. 
Winstead; Associate Professors: R. L Bruck, C. L. Campbell. M. L. Carson (USDA), M. E. Daub. B. C. Haning, H. D. 
Shew; Assistant Professors: V. J. Elliott (USDA). S. Leath (USDA). P. B. Lindgren. S. A. Lommel, C. H. Opperman. J. 
B, Ristaino.S. M. Schneider(USDA),S. R. Shafer(USDA). R.G. Upchurch(USDA);/lrf;'MnrM».si.s<an<Pro/c.s,sor.s. J. L. 
Imbriani (NCDA). S. Spencer (NCDA); Research Associates: K. L. Everts(USDA). D. A. Neher. L. A. Urban. K. Verma. 
Z. Xiong. K. Zagula; Associate Meml)ers of the Faculty: C. G. VanDyke (Botany). R. C. Rufty (Crop Science). E. B. 
Cowling. M. P. Levi (Forestry), C. B. Davey (Forestry. Soil Science). J. H. Wilson. Jr. (Horticulture). W. M, Hagler. Jr. 
(Animal Science, Poultry Science). 

113 



EXTENSION 

Prufessor R. K. Jones, In Charge 

Prufriuioni: C. W. Averre. III. H. E. Duncan. P. B. Shoemaker; Professors Emeriti: N. T. Powell. F. A. Todd. J. C. Wells: 
Annociate Pro/eHHors: } . E. Bailey. D. F. Riichie: Assistant Professor: T. A. Melton. \\l; Research/ Extension Specialist: 
W. 0. CMine. 

Undergraduate instruction in plant pathology is designed to provide introductory and 
advanced courses on the nature and control of plant diseases to students majoring in crop 
science, horticultural science, agricultural education and forestry. It also provides funda- 
mental training necessary for graduate study in plant pathology. 

The Department of Plant Pathology does not offer an undergraduate major in plant 
pathology. (See listing of graduate degrees offered.) 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Employment in research, extension and teaching is available to graduates with advanced 
degrees in plant pathology. Research openings are with the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, state experiment stations and in industry. The rapid development of agricultural 
chemicals and other methods for disease control offers numerous opportunities. 



POULTRY SCIENCE 

Scott Hall (Room 120) 

Professor G. B. Havenstein, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor S. L. Pardue, Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: C. R. Parkhurst 
William Neal Reynolds Professors: C. H. Hill, W. E. Donaldson 

Professors: J. T. Brake. V. L. Christensen, R. E. Cook. F. W. Edens. J. D. Garlich, W. M. Hagler. Jr.. P. B. Hamilton, J. F. 
Ort. J. C. H. Shih. T. D. Siopes; Adjuw;t Professors: K. K. Krueger. K. N. May. D. I. McRee. J. P. Thaxton; Professor 
Emeriti: E. W. Glazener; Adjunct Associate Professor: N. Chernoff, C. A. Ricks. J. K. Tyczkowski; Assistant Professors: 
J.N. Petitte. M. A. Qureshi; v4d7i/«<7 Assistant Professors: T. L. Fredericksen. R. P. Gildersleeve, J. W. Laskey; Research 
Associate: E. S. Casale: Associate Members of the Faculty: W. J. Croom. Jr. (Animal Science). H. R. Ball. Jr.. B. W. 
Sheldon (Food Science). D. P. Wages (College of Veterinary Medicine). 

EXTENSION 

Professor T. A. Carter, In Charge 

Professor: F. T. Jones: Professors Emeriti: W. G. Andrews. J. R. Harris. G. A. Martin. W. C. Mills. Jr., T. B. Morris: 
Assuriale Professor: M. J. Wineland: Assistant Professors: K. E. Anderson. P. R. Ferket. D. V. Rives. S. E. Scheideler: 
AsKislant Professor Emeritus: J. R. West: Extension Specialists: C. E. Brewer, G. S. Davis. 

The Department of Poultry Science provides instruction in the principles of vertically 
integrated poultry production and in such related fields as nutrition, physiology, genetics, 
toxicology and biotechnology. Through teaching, research and extension, the department 
serves students, poultry producers and allied industries. Poultry production has increased 
rapidly during the last two decades and ranks first in North Carolina as a source of 
agricultural income. North Carolina ranks third nationally in the production of poultry 
products; the climatic and economic conditions in the state provide a sound base for 
continued expansion. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The change from small-farm operations to large commercial poultry enterprises has 
created more specialized positions than there are available poultry graduates. Production- 

114 



oriented positions and off-the-farm operations in activities such as processing and distribu- 
tion offer new job opportunities. The allied industries— feed, equipment, financing, phar- 
maceutical and other supplies— need more employees trained in poultry science. Graduates 
hold positions as managers and field representatives for businesses identified with, or 
serving the poultry industry. Graduates are also employed in communication and public 
relations and as teachers and extension and research specialists. Some graduates have their 
own poultry businesses. 

CURRICULA IN POULTRY SCIENCE 

Students desiring the Bachelor of Science with a major in poultry science may choose 
either the science or technology curriculum offered by the Department of Poultry Science. 
(See listing of graduate degrees.) One may obtain a double major in certain other curricula 
through careful use of electives and/or summer school attendance. The student should 
consult the undergraduate advisers in the department(s) concerned. Currently, the pre- 
veterinary science student may utilize all requirements toward a Bachelor of Science 
degree in the science option. 

See the freshman year and basic requirements for College of Agriculture and Life 
Sciences. 

SCIENCE PROGRAM 

This curriculum is for the student interested in the basic biological and physical sciences. 
The student is better prepared for advanced study in various disciplines such as genetics, 
nutrition, physiology and pathology. Several pre-veterinary students are currently en- 
rolled in this curriculum and are seeking a Bachelor of Science degree in poultry science. 
(See Pre-Professional Program in Veterinary Medicine). 



Credits 
1 



ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS . 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences (21 Credits) 
Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(27-31 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MAUI Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry .. 3 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Mathematics or 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Cal. A or 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I .3-4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

PY 211-212 College Physics I, II or 

PY 221 College Physics 8-5 

Physical Education and Free Electives 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 



Group A. B. C Courses 
(22-26 Credits) 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry 4 

EB 306 Agricultural Law, or 

EB 307 Business Law I or 

EB 326 Human Resource Management or 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 4 

Group A Electives (Biological Science) 4 

Group A Electives 0-4 

Group B or C Electives 3 

Departmental Requirements and Electii^es 
(26 Credits) 

PO201 Poultry Science and Production 4 

PO (ANS. FS) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 3 

PO 405 Avian Physiology 4 

PO(ANS. NTR)415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

PO 490 Poultry Seminar 1 

PO (GN) 520 Poultry Breeding 3 

PO (ZO) 524 Comparative Endocrinology 4 

VMF 401 Poultry Diseases 4 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 130 



115 



TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM 

The technology curriculum in poultry science is designed to prepare students for direct 
entry into the poultry industry upon graduation; allows a greater selection of courses in the 
applied science and technology areas; and offers a student both basic and applied knowl- 
edge in poultry production which can be used directly in a family poultry operation upon 
graduation. 



Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Language (12 Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

COM (SP) no Public Speaking 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

Electives 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(31-S5 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry ..3 
MA 114 Intro, to Finite Mathematics or 
MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Analytical Geometry & Calc. A 3-4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

PY 211-212 College Physics I. II or 

PY 221 College Physics 5-8 

Elective in Group A (Biological Science) 4 

Physical Education and Free Electives 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Phystical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 



Group A, B. C Courses 
(16-20 CrediU) 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry or 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

EB 306 Agricultural Law or 

EB 307 Business Law I or 

EB 326 Human Resource Management or 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 

GN411 The Principles of Genetics 4 

Electives in A, B. or C Courses 5-9 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(28 Credits) 

PO 201 Poultry Science and Production 4 

PO 301 Evaluation of Live Poultry 2 

PO (ANS. FS) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs 3 

PO 405 Avian Physiology 4 

PO (ANS. NTR) 415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

VMF 401 Poultry Diseases 4 

Select a minimum of two courses from: 4 

PO 420 Turkey Production (2) 

PO 421 Commercial Egg Production (2) 

PO 422 Incubation and Hatchery Management (2) 

PO 423 Broiler Production (2) 

PO 490 Poultry Seminar 1 

PO (GN) 520 Poultry Breeding 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 130 



PREMEDICAL SCIENCES 

Premedical. predental, preoptometry, prepharmacy, preveterinary, and other allied 
health preprofessional programs are offered as foundation courses in several curricular 
tracks with emphasis on the physical and biological sciences. Requirements for most 
premedical sciences are similar. A number of students are accepted each year in leading 
medical colleges; several have received outstanding scholarships. 

For the premedical, predental, and preoptometry programs, see zoology, biochemistry 
and the biological sciences curricula and consult Dr. William C. Grant, 111 Patterson Hall, 
Chairman of the University Preprofessional Health Science Committee. 



116 



SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY 
AND SOCIAL WORK 

(Also see Humanities and Social Sciences) 
1911 Building (Room 301) 
Professor L. B. Otto, Head of the Department 

Professor W. B. Clifford, Associate Head, CALS Teaching and Research 
Associate Professor M. P. Atkinson, Associate Head, CHASS Teaching and Research 
Associate Professor A. C. Davis, Undergraduate Coordinator (Applied Sociology) 
Professor E. M. Crawford, Graduate Administrator 
Associate Professor G. D. Hill, Undergraduate Administrator 

SOCIOLOGY TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Professors: L. R. Delia Fave, V. A. Hiday, R. L. Moxley. M. M. Sawhney, M. D. Schulman, R. C. Wimberley; Adjunct 
Professor: R. D. Mustian; Professors Emeriti: J. N. Collins, L. W. Drabick. C. P. Marsh, J. N. Young: Associate 
Professors: R. C. Brisson, F. R. Czaja, G. D. Hill. J. C. Leiter, R. J. Thomson, M. S. Thompson, D. T. Tomaskovic-Devey, 
K. M. Troost, E. M. Woodrum, M. T. ZingrafUAssistant Professors: P. L. McCall, M. L. Schwalbe, A. E, Thompson. C. R. 
Zimmer: Assistant Professors Emeriti: C. G. Dawson. T. M. Hyman; Associate Member of the Faculty: R. D. Mustian 
(Adult and Community College Education). 

SOCIOLOGY EXTENSION 

Associate Professor S. K. Garber, Specialist in Charge 

Professors: V. C. Hamilton. T. N. Hobgood. Jr.; Professors Emeriti: P. P. Thompson. M. E. Voland; Associate Professors: S. 
K. Garber, S. C. Lilley: Assistant Professor: T. J. Hoban. 

ANTHROPOLOGY TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Associate Professor J. M. Wallace, Coordinator 

Associate Professors: G. S. Nickerson, I. Rovner. M. L. Walek; Associat£ Professor Emeritus: J. G. Peck; Assistant 
Professor: R. S. Ellovich. 

SOCIAL WORK TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Associate Professor W. C. Peebles-Wilkins, Director 

Professor: R. N. Reid: Associate Professor: W. C. Peebles-Wilkins; Associate Professor Emeritus: I. E. Russell; Assistant 
Professors: J. S. Brown. L. A. Smith; Lecturer: L. R. Williams. 

This department teaches students the principles and techniques for understanding 
human group behavior. Most specifically the department seeks: (1) to educate students to 
understand communities and organizations and the people who live and work within them; 
(2) to qualify exceptional students at the undergraduate and graduate level for sociological 
research, teaching, and extension careers; (3) to solve problems in human group relations. 
Applied sociology is good training for a wide variety of careers. It is useful for any job which 
involves work with people, organizations or communities. It is also good preparation for 
professional careers in local government, personnel relations, law, the clergy, business and 
management. 

CURRICULUM IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 

The degree of Bachelor of Science with a major in applied sociology is offered under the 
science curriculum of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. In addition to topics in 
agricultural and community sociology, majors in this department have the option of con- 
centrating in criminal justice. 



117 



SCIENCE PROGRAM 

Credits 
ALS \M Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

IjanguagtH IW Creditx) 

F.Ni; 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

IjiUgutLge or Literature Elective 6 

Humanities and Social Sciencen 
(.'I Credits) 

A NT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

EB 2111 Economics I or 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

I'S 201 Introduction to American Government or 

I'S 202 State and Local Government 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Electives (Six hours must come from Humanities- 
Group D. Area I Discipline) 9 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(29 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology or 

BS 105 Biology in the Modern World 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I or 

CH 1 1 1 Foundations of Chemistry 4 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers and Their 
Uses or 

CSC Elective 3 

MA 1 1 1 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry . . 3 
MA i:n Analytic Geometry & Calc. A or 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

ST 311 Introduction to Sutistics 3 

Physical or Biological Science Elective 3 

Physical Education and Free Electives 
(17 Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 13 

Group A, B. C, D Courses 
(22 Credits) 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3 

GN HOI Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN411 The Principles of Genetics 3-4 

SOC 351 Population and Planning 3 

Electives in A. B. C. or D Courses 12-13 

Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(2H Credits) 

SOC 241 Rural Society. USA 3 

SOC 300 Sociological Research Methods 4 



SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

SOC 311 Community Relationships 3 

SOC 342 Rural Soc. Around World 3 

SOC 400 Theories of Social Structure or 

SOC 401 Theories of Social Interaction 3 

SOC 410 Formal Organizations 3 

SOC 485 Ind. Field Work in Applied Soc 3 

SOC Elective at 400 level or above 3 

Strongly Recommended: For students interested in app- 
lied quantitative methods, PS 471, SOC 590 and addi- 
tional courses in statistics. 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 130 

CONCENTRATION IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

(ALS 103, Languages, Physical and Biological Sciences, 
Physical Education and Free Electives are same as 
above,) 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

EB 201 Economics I or 

EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

PS 201 Introduction to American Government 3 

PS 311 Criminal Justice Policy Process 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Electives from Humanities— Group D 

Area I discipline 6 

Group A. B. C. D Courses 
(22 Credits) 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology 3 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN411 The Principles of Genetics 3-4 

SOC 306 Criminolog>' 3 

SOC 351 Population and Planning 3 

SOC (PS) 413 Criminal Justice Field Work 4 

Political Science Elective 3 

Electives 2-3 

Departmental Requirements 
(28 CrediU) 

SOC 241 Rural Society USA 3 

SOC .300 Sociological Research Methods 4 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

SOC 342 Rur Soc Around World 3 

SOC 400 Theories of Social Structure or 

SOC 401 Theories of Social Interaction 3 

Criminal Justice Electives 12 

(must include one course in Sociology and one course 
in Political Science . . . See adviser for listing.) 



MINOR IN APPLIED SOCIOLOGY 

The Minor in Applied Sociology is a 15-hour program aimed at providing students the 
basic conceptual framework of sociology and the information necessary for applying this 
approach to the resolution of problems, especially in the work and organizational 
environments. 



118 



SOIL SCIENCE 

Williams Hall (Room 2234) 

Professor E. J. Kamprath, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor H. J. Kleiss, Undergraduate Coordinator 

TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professors: S. W. Buol, W. A. Jackson 
William Neal Reynolds Professors: W. A. Jackson, E. J. Kamprath 

Professors: D. K. Cassel. F. R. Cox. C. B. Davey. J. W. Gilliam. D. W. Israel (USDA), L. D. King. G. S. Miner. C. D. Raper. 
Jr.. P. A. Sanchez. R. J. Volk. S. B. Weed. A. G. Wollum: Adjunct Professors: P. G. Hunt. R. J. McCracken: Professors 
Emeriti: W. V. Bartholomew. G. A. Cummings, R. W. Cummings. J. W. Fitts. C. B. McCants. W. G. Woltz: Associate 
Professors: A. Amoozegar, S. W. Broome. G. D. Hoyt. J. E. Shelton. M.J. Vepraskas; Adjunct Associate Professor: M. R. 
Tucker: Associate Professors Emeriti: W. D. Lee. R. E. McCoUum: Assistant Professors: T. J. Smyth. M. G. Wagger; 
Assistant Professors Emeriti: L. E. Aull. C. K. Martin: Senior Researcher: W. P. Robarge: Research Associates: E. W. 
Harmsen. H. K. Mwandemere. P. D. Smithson: Associate Membersof the Faculty: E. D. Seneca (Botany): H. L. Allen. Jr., 
L. T. Henry. R. Lea (Forestry). S. R. Shafer (Plant Pathologj'): R- W. Skaggs(Biological & Agricultural Engineering): J. 
B. Weber (Crop Science). 

EXTENSION 

Professor J. P. Zublena, In Charge 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M. G. Cook 

Professor: J. V. Baird: Professor Emeritus: J. A. Phillips: Associate Professors: M. T. Hoover, J. P. Lilly. G. C. Naderman, 
Jr. 

The Department of Soil Science trains students in fundamentals of soils, develops an 
understanding and appreciation of soils as a resource, and presents principles of soil 
management and utilization for both farm and non-agricultural purposes. Soils constitute 
one of the largest capital investments in farming and proper soil management is essential 
for efficient production. Future world food needs will require people conversant in soil 
resources and use of fertilizers. Soil properties are important considerations in urban- 
suburban planning and development. Also, knowledge of soil and its interactions with 
potential pollutants is essential in maintaining environmental quality. Therefore, the 
demand for people trained in soils by private consultants, agribusiness, research, service, 
planning-development, education and conservation-related agencies should continue to be 
great. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Soil science graduates fill positions of leadership and service in land resource planning, 
conservation and agriculture. Among these are opportunities as farm operators and man- 
agers, county agricultural extension agents and employees of other public advisory agen- 
cies. Soil Conservation Service and other conservation-related agencies concerned with soil 
resources. Graduates also serve as technical representatives and salesmen in fertilizer 
companies and in other agribusiness activities. Many opportunities exist for private con- 
sulting soil scientists who serve a variety of clientele needs. 

Provision is made for students wishing a more thorough training in biological sciences, 
chemistry, mathematics and physics leading to graduate study. (See listing of graduate 
degrees.) Students with advanced degrees have wide opportunities in teaching, research, 
service and extension with state, federal and private educational and research institutions 
and agencies. 



119 



SOIL SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 

The Bachelor of Science degree may be obtained through programs in agronomy or 
conservation. The agronomy program is administered jointly with the Crop Science 
Department. A soil science concentration is available in the agronomy curriculum. A soils 
concentration is also available in the conservation curriculum. (The agronomy and conser- 
vation curricula are shown earlier under College of Agriculture and Life Sciences). 

MINOR IN SOIL SCIENCE 

The academic minor in Soil Science is offered to students desiring a strong knowledge of 
the principles of Soil Science to complement their major. It is intended to strengthen the 
understanding of basic physical and chemical soil properties that would be relevant to a 
student's particular land management interest. These interests may include but are not 
limited to conservation, forestry, geology, landscape architecture, horticulture, biological 
and agricultural engineering, agricultural business management, or agricultural educa- 
tion. Fifteen hours of required courses and three hours of electives are necessary to com- 
plete the minor. 



PRE-PROFESSIONAL PROGRAM IN 
VETERINARY MEDICINE 

Students with interests in veterinary medicine who enroll in the undergraduate pro- 
grams at North Carolina State University should pursue a baccalaureate degree in a major 
area that fulfills the requirements of the pre-professional program. Pre-professional 
courses are designed to give students a background in animal health, poultry health and 
laboratory animal care. At the present time a preveterinary curriculum is offered in the 
College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. A student may major in animal science, poultry 
science, biochemistry, zoology, biological sciences, or biological sciences options, as well as 
in other science curricula. The choice of the degree program should be carefully considered 
to encompass alternate career objectives. If a student is accepted to veterinary college 
before completion of his or her undergraduate degree, some course credits may be trans- 
ferred from the veterinary program toward completion of the Bachelor of Science degree. 
Arrangements for this procedure should be made with the degree-granting college or 
department prior to entering veterinary college. 

The courses listed below are minimum requirements for all students applying for 
entrance to the College of Veterinary Medicine at N. C. State University. A grade of C or 
better on each course and an overall grade point average of 2.75 or above is required for 
application. 

Language* Credits 

ENG 111. 1 12 English Composition 6 

Phyxical Srieneex 

BCH 4.51 Introduction to Biochemistry '. 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chemistry I & II 8 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus or 

MA 131 Analytical Geometry & Calc. A 4 

PY 21 1. 21-^ College Phvsics I. II or 

PY 221 College Physics 8-5 

ST 31 1 Introduction to Statistics 3 

hiolofftcal ScienreK 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

G.S 4 1 1 The Principles of Genetics 4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 



120 



Nutrition 

At least one course in animal nutrition is necessary. 

ANS (PO) 204 Feeds and Feeding or 

ANS (FS, NTR) 301 Modern Nutrition or 

ANS (NTR, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition 3-4 

Faculty advisors have a list of suggested courses for pre-professional students. 



TOXICOLOGY 

Method-Unit IV 

Professor E. Hodgson. Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor R. C. Smart, Graduate Administrator 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: 
E. Hodgson 

Professors: W. C. Dauterman, T. J. Sheets; Adjunct Professors: A. L. Chasson, J. R. Fouts, J. A. Goldstein. R. J. 
Langenbach, R. M. Philpot: Professor Emeritus: F. E. Guthrie: Associate Professor: P. E. Levi: Adjunct Associate 
Professor: H. B. Matthews: Assistant Professors: G. A. LeBlanc. M. B. St. Clair: Adjunct Assuttant Professor: P. A. 
James: Research Associates: D. G. Presuitti. R. L. Rose. J. R. Schiavone. K. Venkatesh. 

The Department of Toxicology offers courses of study leading to the Master of Toxicology, 
Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. The Department of Toxicology trains 
qualified individuals to conduct basic and applied scientific research on the mechanisms of 
chemically induced toxicity, to advance toxicology as a science and to communicate con- 
cepts of toxicology. 



ZOOLOGY 

Gardner Hall (Room 1627— South Wing) 

Professor J. F. Roberts, Interim Head of the Department 

Professor G. C. Miller, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: J. F. Roberts 

Professors: G. T. Barthalmus. P. C. Bradbury. B. J. Copeland. P. D. Doerr. W. C. Grant, C. F. Lytle, J. M. Miller. R. L. 
Noble. D. E. Smith. H. A. Underwood, J. G. Vandenbergh: ^d;unc<Pro/e.s.sors.F. A. Cross. J. B. Funderburg. Jr.. J. D. 
Hair. D. E. Hoss. G. R. Huntsman: Professors Emeriti: D. E. Davis. W. W. Hassler. M. T. Huish, T. L. Quay: Associate 
Professors: B. L. Black, P. T. Bromley. L. B. Crowder, M. N. Feaver. W. J. Fleming (USDI). J. F. Gilliam. R. M. 
Grossfeld. R. G. Hodson. S. C. Mozley. R. A. Powell. J. R. Walters: Adjunct Associate Professors: D. E. Hoss. C. S. 
Manooch, III, D. S. Peters, L. W. Reiter, G. J. SanJulian, G. W. Thayer: Assistant Professors: J . A. Collazo(USDI), J. M. 
Hinshaw, T. M. Losordo, J. A. Rice, C. V. Sullivan: Adjunct Assistayit Professors: S. V. Chiavetta, D. R. Colby, R. J. 
Ksivhck: Adjunct Instructor: R. B. Hamilton: Research Associates:C. A. Caldwell, M. L. Moser. W. J. Zielinski: Teaching 
Technicians: C. K. Heinsohn. J. W. Zimmerman: Associate Members of the Faculty: B. H. Grimes (Interdisciplinary 
Studies). E. J. Jones (Extension Forest Resources). R. A. Lancia (Forest Resources), K. H. Pollock (Statistics), T. G, 
Wolcott (Engineering and Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences). 

Affiliated Faculty, Medical Technology Programs 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine/N. C. Baptist Hospital- 
Michael O'Connor, M.D., Medical Director 
Lenora Flynn, MT(ASCP), A.B., M.Ed. 

Carolinas Medical Center- 
Edward H. Lipford, III, M.D., Medical Director 
Elizabeth T. Anderson, MHDL, MT(ASCP), CLS(NCA), Program Director 



121 



Duke University Medical Center- 
Frances K. Widmann. M.D.. Medical Director 
Mariraret Schmidt. MT(ASCP). SH. CLS(NCA). M.A.. Profrram Director 

Moms Cone Memorial Hospital- 
Mary C. Steuterman. M.D.. Medical Director 
Jean G. Smith. MT (ASCP>. M.Ed. 

The Department of Zoology provides undergraduate and graduate instruction in special- 
ized biological sciences areas. Undergraduates study all levels of biological organization 
from the molecular to the community. Zoology majors are well prepared for graduate work 
in zoolog>' and related fields of sciences. (See listing of graduate degrees.) Participation in 
supervised programs of research is strongly encouraged. A strong science background is 
provided for students planning to enter dentistry, medicine, optometry, veterinary medi- 
cine and allied health sciences, such as medical technology. Ecology, including wildlife, 
fisheries, parasitology and marine biology are strong areas. Cellular and molecular biol- 
ogy, including neurobiology, also are emphasized. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Bachelor of Science graduates in zoology have many career options. Graduates are well 
prepared for employment in various government agencies or private industries. Graduates 
may continue their education with studies leading to advanced degrees in many areas of 
biological sciences such as zoology, cell biology, wildlife and fisheries science, marine 
science and biomedical subdisciplines. Many also choose to enter professional schools for 
degrees in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine and other health related areas. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science degree with a major in zoology, fisheries and wildlife sciences or 
medical technology is offered under the science curriculum of the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. Within these majors a student may specialize depending upon interest 
and ability. 

The zoology curriculum prepares students for graduate school, medical, dental, and 
veterinary schools. Certain professional schools have specific requirements which differ 
slightly from the zoology curriculum. Students should consult catalogs of specific profes- 
sional schools to ensure completion of any special requirements. 

Other curricula include the fisheries and wildlife sciences program and the medical 
technology program. The clinical year for the medical technology program is by competi- 
tive selection at an affiliated hospital. Students are advised by faculty in their special areas 
of interest. 



CURRICULUM IN ZOOLOGY 

Credits 
ALS ion Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

iMVffutmeK (12 Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric .3 

ENG 112 Composition and Readint; 3 

Literature Elective 3 

I^niruaKe or Communication Elective 3 

HumanitieH and Social Sciences 
(Jl Credits) 

Electives (no more than two 
in any one department) 21 



Pkyitical and Biological Sciences 
(il Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN411 Principles of Genetics 3-4 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trig 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A 4 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

Mathematical Science Elective: second calculus or 
computer science or ST 31 1 3 



122 



Physical Education and Free Electire.s Departmental Requirements and Elective^ 

(17 Credits) (SO Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 ZO 205 Intro, to Cellular & Dev'mt. Zool 4 

Physical Education Electives 3 ZO 208 Intro, to Orffanismal & Evolu. Zool 4 

Free Electives 13 ZO 305 Cell & Animal Physiology Lab 2 

Selected Zoolo^ Electives' 16 

Group A Electives Selected Laboratory Courses^ 4 

(H Credits) ,, 

Hours Required for Graduation 130 

Restricted Electives 8 

'ZOOLOGY ELECTIVES— 16 credit hours to be selected from the following with at least one course from each catepory. 

Organuimal Level Systems Level 

ZO303 (4) Z0 421 (3) 

Z0 315 (3) Z0 323 (4) 

ZO402 (2) Z0 361 (3) 

Cellular and Molecular Level Supraorganismal Level 

BCH 451 (3) BO/ZO 360 (3) 

BO/Z0 414{3) ZO410(3) 

ZO 345 (4) ZO 450 (3) 

■■'ZOOLOGY LABORATORIES— 4 credit hours of 
laboratory work are to be selected from the following: 

ALS 499 (1-3)— must be laboratory research 

ZO 365 (D— ZO 360 (3) is a corequisite 

ZO 403 (2) 

ZO 460 (2) 

ZO 480 (3) 

ZO 590 (1-3)— must be laboratory research 

SPECIFIC RECOMMENDATIONS FOR RESTRICTED ELECTIVES 

(SDM) Medical Schools and Dental Schools: 

ZO 315. 323, 345; BCH 451; GN 412; MB 401, 411; CH 315 (required by many dental schools) 
(SZO) Zoology; 

BO 200; BCH 451; ENT 425; FW 221, 420; MB401. 411; GN 412; ZO 212, 221. 315, 323.410. 420. 425, 441 and any 500 level 

course; and any approved computer science, statistics, or mathematics course. 

(See also Pre-Professional Program in Veterinary Medicine). 

MINOR IN ZOOLOGY 

A minor in zoology is available to undergraduates majoring in any department other than 
zoology. This minor will be useful to students applying to professional schools such as 
medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, and other health sciences. Basic knowledge in 
animal biology may also be useful to students seeking careers in government, industry, or 
education. The minor consists of a minimum of 15 credit hours, including two core courses, 
ZO 205 and ZO 208. The remaining courses must be selected from three- or four-credit 
courses at the 300 or 400 level with at least one course having a laboratory. 

SCIENCE PROGRAM IN MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 

Professor G. C. Miller, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Two programs are available in medical technology. The first is a four-year collegiate 
curriculum with a Bachelor of Science degree in zoology (see above) followed by a year of 
training in any hospital clinical laboratory approved by the American Medical Association. 
The second program is designed to be completed in four calendar years. The student takes 
the prescribed curriculum (see below) for three years at North Carolina State University 
and a fourth year (12 months) of clinical training at an affiliated hospital. Successful 
completion of this program qualifies the student for a Bachelor of Science degree in medical 
technology from N. C. State. Acceptance by the clinical laboratory is competitive and 
students in either program outlined above must apply for clinical training. After comple- 
tion of either program the student is eligible to take the national examination for certifica- 
tion as a registered Medical Technologist. 

123 



Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

lAinfruagen iJ2 Credits) 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

ENC 1 12 Composition & Reading 3 

Eniflish. Communication, or Laniruage Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Humanitiea and Social Sciences 
(21 Credits) 

Electives (no more than two courses 

in any one department) 21 

Physical and Biological Sciences 
(27 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistrj' 4 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry ..3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Caic. A 4 

FY 211. 212 CoilegePhysicsI.il 8 

Physical Editcation and Free Electives 
(9 Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 5 

Group A Courses 
(19-20 Credits) 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chem. I & II 8 

GN411 The Principles of Genetics or 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3-4 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 

MB 411 Medical Microbiology 4 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(11 Credits) 

ZO 201 General Zoology 4 

ZO 303 Vert. Zoology 4 

ZO(BO)414 Cell Biology or 

ZO 421 Principles of Physiology 3 

100 

plus 
Twelve-month course in Medical 
Technology at one of the affiliated 
hospital programs. 
Microbiology 
Clinical Chemistry 

Hematology 35-50 hours 

Histology & (variable in the 

Cytology four programs) 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 135 

The affiliated programs are: 

Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem. N.C. 

Carolinas Medical Center. Charlotte. N.C. 

Moses H. Cone Hospital. Greensboro. N.C. 

Duke Univ. Medical Center. Durham. N.C. 



FISHERIES AND WILDLIFE SCIENCES 

Professor R. L. Noble. Undergraduate Coordinator 

The Departments of Zoology and Forestry jointly administer the program in Fisheries 
and Wildlife Sciences. Undergraduate education emphasizes ecological principles and 
their application to research problems and natural resource management needs. Majors 
are well prepared for graduate work and entry-level professional positions. 

Credits 
ALS 103 Introductory Topics in ALS 1 

Languages (12 Credits) 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

EN(; 1 12 Composition & Reading 3 

ENG .'533 Commun. for Science & Res 3 

COM(SP)110 Public Speaking 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences (21 Credits) 

Economics Electives 6 

Literature Elective 3 

Political Science Electives 6 

Electi^'es (3 credits must come from Humanities— 

(iroup D. A.-ea I Discipline) 6 



124 



Physical and Biological Sciences (J,9-50 Credits) 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 

BO (ZO) 365 Ecology Lab 

BS 100 General Biology 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 

CH 221 and CH 223 Organic Chemistry I and II or 

CH 220 Intro. Organic Chem. and Phys. Sci. Elective (4 hours) 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN 411 Principles of Genetics 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 

PY 221 College Physics 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics and one of the following: 

BAE 241. CSC 200. FOR 273. MA 214, MA 231 

ZO 201 General Zoology 

ZO 421 Principles of Physiology 

Physical Education and Free Electives (12 Credits) 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 

Physical Education Electives 

Electives 



Group A. B, C Courses 
(9 hours, imldtife) (12 hours, fisheries} 

Credits 

ANS(PO. NTR)415 Comparative Nutrition 3 

ANS 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates 3 

BO 565 Plant Community Ecology 4 

BO 574 Phycology 3 

CE 486 Sanitary Engineering Measurements of 

Water Quality 3 

ENT(ZO)425 General Entomology 3 

FOR 210 Dendrology-Gymnosperms 2 

FOR 211 Dendrology-Angiosperms 2 

FOR 272 Forest Mensuration 3 

FOR 353 Air Photo Interpretation 3 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management 3 

FOR 501 Forest Influences and Watershed Management 3 

FOR 591 Forestry Problems Arranged 

FW (ZO) 515 Growth and Reproduction of Fishes 3 

FW (ZO) 554 Wildlife Field Studies 3 

FW (ZO) 586 Aquaculture I 3 

FW (ZO) 587 Aquaculture I Laboratory 1 

MB 501 Advanced Microbiology I 3 

MEA200 Introduction to the Marine Environment 3 

MEA(ZO)520 Principles of Biological Oceanography 3 

RRA 442 Wildland Recreation Environments 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

SSC452 Soil Classification 4 

ZO 315 General Parasitology 3 

ZO 323 Comparative Anatomy 4 

Z0 441 Biologj' of Fishes 3 

ZO 442 Biology of Fishes Laboratory 1 

ZO501 Ornithology 3 

ZO 517 Population Ecology 3 

ZO 419 Introduction to Limnology 4 

ZO 544 Mammalogy 3 



Fisheries 
X 
X 



Wildlife 
X 
X 
X 



125 



Departmental Requirements and Electives 
(32 hours, midlife) (29 hours, fisheries) 

Credits Fisheries Wildlife 

BO 21)0 Plant Life '• ^ 

BO -JOS Systematic BoUny 4 ^ 

FW(ZO)221 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 X X 

FW(FOR»310 Fisheries and Wildlife Inventory 

& Management 6 X X 

FW(Z0).H5;i Wildlife Managrement 3 X X 

FW (FORI 404 Forest Wildlife Management 3 X 

FW(ZO)420 Fishery Science 3 X X 

FW (ZO) 430 Fish and Wildlife Administration, 

Policy and Law 3 X X 

FW(ZO;553 Principles of Wildlife Science 3 X X 

Z0 441 Biology of Fishes 3 X 

ZO 442 Biology of Fishes Laboratory 1 X 

Z0 419 Introduction to Limnology 4 X 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 136 



N.C. AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE 

D. F. Bateman, Dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

R. J. Kuhr, Associate Dean and Director of N.C. Agricultural Research Service 

G. J. Kriz. Associate Director of Research 

W. H. Johnson. Assistant Director of Research 

The North Carolina Agricultural Research Service is the agricultural life sciences, 
forestry, and home economics research agency of the State of North Carolina. It is funded 
principally by appropriations from the North Carolina General Assembly, federal formula 
funds and grants and contracts. 

The purpose of the N.C. Agricultural Research Service is to conduct research on (1) the 
development and maintenance of an effective agricultural and forestry industry in North 
Carolina, including economically sound sources of supplies and equipment needed in 
agriculture and forestry and market outlets for the products of agriculture and forestry. (2) 
the improvement of rural homes, rural life and rural environment, and (3) the maintenance 
of a reliable supply of agricultural and forestry products for the consuming public. This 
requires research to solve current problems and research to provide a foundation of 
scientific knowledge in the biological, physical and social sciences. 

The N.C. Agricultural Research Service faculty brings well-trained personnel to the 
university, whose teaching in many specialized fields agricultural, biological and social 
sciences assures the maintenance of curricula of high standards. It contributes to the 
advanced training of students who are destined to become the leaders, teachers and investi- 
gators necessary in the maintenance of agriculture and forestry on a sound economic plane. 

PUBLICATIONS 

The N.C. Agricultural Research Service publishes bulletins and scientific papers on 
research results conducted by the staff. Copies of bulletins may be obtained from the 
Department of Agricultural Communications and scientific papers from the author. 

SERVICES 

The faculty of the N.C. Agricultural Research Service conduct original and other 
research bearing directly on and contributing to the establishment and maintenance of 
permanent and effective agricultural and forestry industries in North Carolina. This 
research includes field and laboratory experimentation in the biological, physical, social, 
and environmental sciences. Primary emphasis is given to the production, processing. 

126 



distribution, and consumption of the many agricultural and forestry commodities pro- 
duced throughout the state. Also, major attention is given to research programs aimed at 
improving the quality of life of both rural and urban peoples. 



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

D. F. Bateman, Dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

R. C. Wells, Associate Dean and Director of the Agricultural Extension Service 

T. N. Hobgood, Interim Associate Director of Extension 

The Agricultural Extension Service of North Carolina State University is a cooperative 
undertaking among the United States Department of Agriculture, the State of North 
Carolina, the 100 counties in the state and the Cherokee Indian Reservation. Its work is 
supported by federal funds made available under the Smith-Lever Act of 1914, as amended, 
by state and county appropriations, and by grants and contracts. 

The federal and state appropriations are used to maintain an administrative and special- 
ist staff and to pay a portion of the salary and the travel expenses of the county extension 
agents. Under this cooperative arrangement, the Agricultural Extension Service serves as 
the "educational arm" of the United States Department of Agriculture, and as the "field 
faculty" of North Carolina State University in the areas of agriculture and natural re- 
sources; family living; 4-H and youth; and, community and rural development. 

The primary purpose of the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service is to take to 
the people of the state the latest and best information obtainable— particularly that which is 
related to agriculture and natural resources; home economics and youth; and, rural 
development— and help them to interpret and use this information in building a more 
prosperous and satisfying life. 

This program has sufficient flexibility to permit special attention to the problems, needs 
and interests of the people in each county. County Advisory Councils are utilized to deter- 
mine and prioritize the county educational program content. Assistance is given to individ- 
uals, families, communities, agricultural and seafood processing and marketing firms, 
other businesses and certain organizations. This includes work with adults and youth m 
both the city and rural areas. . 

In carrying out this educational program, a variety of methods and techniques are 
employed: method and result demonstrations; meetings; visits to farms, homes and busi- 
nesses; organized groups of men, women and youth; tours; leaflets, pamphlets and other 
printed materials and mass media. 

The basic sources of information to be taught through this educational program are the 
findings and recommendations resulting from research conducted by the Agricultural 
Research Service in this and other states and by the United States Department of 
Agriculture. 



127 



AGRICULTURAL INSTITUTE 

Patterson Hall (Room 107) 

D. F. Bateman, Dean of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

J. L. Oblinger. Associate Dean and Director of Academic Affairs 

J. F. Ort. Assistant Director of Academic Affairs and Director of the Agricultural Institute 

W. C. Grant. Assistant Director of Academic Affairs 

The Agricultural Institute is a two-year, terminal academic program which provides 
education and training in food, agriculture, horticulture, turfgrass management and 
agribusiness. It is part of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at North Carolina 
State University. This program began in 1959 and was funded by legislative appropriation. 
Its objective is to train those desiring a comprehensive education in the food and agricultu- 
ral sciences and agribusiness. 

Individuals with institute training command attractive salaries, assume a more promi- 
nent role of leadership and become a distinct asset to various segments of the industry 
related to food and agriculture. They make significant contributions to their community, 
state and nation by being involved in the world's most vital industry. 

The instructional programs are organized and conducted as a part of the over-all resident 
instruction program for Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Institute is an addition to and 
not a substitute for, the college's regular degree granting program. However, the faculty in 
residence for the four-year programs are responsible for organizing and teaching courses 
offered by the Institute. 

People with training similar to that of the Institute are in demand by food and agricultu- 
ral industries. As demand changes, courses will be evaluated and alterations will be made 
accordingly. Such a re-evaluation also aids the technical manpower needs of industry. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Rapid technical advancement has been important in changing agriculture from a small 
production industry to the nation's largest industry. Closely associated with production 
agriculture are those areas related to recreation and beautification such as turfgrass 
management, flowers and ornamental plants. Increased production and consumer demand 
for convenience-type foods have stimulated the food processing industry, in turn increasing 
food distribution requirements. 

Today's complex agriculture requires a larger work force. This work force must be able 
to deal with a vast array of problems and opportunities and Institute graduates can assume 
responsible positions in the total agricultural industry. Some career examples are: agricul- 
tural lending institution agent, farm and herd managers, research technicians, salesmen, 
retail farm supply and equipment outlet managers, golf course superintendents, nursery 
managers, agricultural pest control specialists, quality control technicians, food service 
supervisors and others. More job opportunities than graduates make salaries attractive. 

The college maintains a Placement Office to assist graduates in finding employment. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Any individual who has received a diploma from an accredited high school or has passed 
the high school equivalency examination administered by the State Department of Public 
Instruction is eligible for admission consideration. Each application will be reviewed and 
evaluated oy the Institute Director. 

For additional information write: Director, Agricultural Institute, Box 7642, 107 Patter- 
son Hall. N.C. State University, Raleigh, N.C. 27695-7642, Telephone (919) 737-3248. 



128 



PROGRAMS OF STUDY 

Graduates of the Agricultural Institute are awarded the Associate in Applied Science 
degree. The nine programs of study are: Agribusiness Management; Agricultural Mechan- 
ization and Management; Agricultural Pest Control; Field Crops Technology; Ornamen- 
tals and Landscape Technology; Food Processing, Distribution and Service; General Agri- 
culture; Livestock Management and Technology (animal husbandry option, dairy hus- 
bandry option, swine husbandry option); and Turfgrass Management. 



SCHOOL OF DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 

J. T. Regan, Dean 

D. W. Dalton, Associate Dean and Coordinator of Advising 

J. P. Rand, Assistant Dean 

G. J. Hardie, Director of Research 

V. W. Aldridge, Administrative Assistant 

C. Carlton, Librarian, Design Library 

W. K. Bayley, Learning Resources Specialist, Media Center 

Wayne Godwin, Acting Learning Resources Specialist, Computer Center 

R. Goldberg, Learning Resources Specialist, Materials Processing Lab 

The School of Design, since its beginning in 1948, has addressed design in the broadest 
sense involving the disciplines of architecture, landscape architecture, product and visual 
design in a context of educational innovation. While the designer's traditional role is 
understood as that of giving meaningful form to the environment, the school gives attention 
to the larger responsibility of design in human, social, economic, political and behavioral 
terms. The school seeks to develop the designer's perception, knowledge base, skills and 
analytical problem solving abilities. 

The expanding range of career opportunities in design, professional and otherwise, is 
equaled by the varied interests possessed by our students. Through a selective admissions 
process, the school's student population is highly motivated and heterogeneous. The faculty 
represents an equally broad spectrum of educational and professional expertise. The 
diversity of the faculty, both professionally and philosophically, provides unique opportuni- 
ties for student development. These three factors in our educational matrix (career oppor- 
tunities, student interests, and faculty expertise) are supported with a curriculum which 
affords each student the ability to shape, with faculty advice, a plan of study capable of 
facilitating his or her interests. While the school embraces the design disciplines of archi- 
tecture, design, landscape architecture, product and visual design within a departmental 
structure, it functions as a unified educational center, interactive and dedicated to prepar- 
ing designers who are capable of shaping the environment in whatever scale they choose but 
in response to the needs of society. 

CURRICULA AND DEGREES 

The School of Design offers undergraduate instruction leading to a Bachelor of Envir- 
onmental Design degree in the disciplines of architecture, design, landscape architecture, 
product design and visual design. 



129 



The learninjr activities for our students are divided into three curriculum areas: (1) 
jrenerai education courses including English, mathematics, humanities, social sciences, 
and natural sciences: (2) core courses which deal with bodies of knowledge and skills 
applicable to design and common to all disciplines, including communication and graphics, 
behavior, environment, history and philosophy, physical elements and systems, methods 
and management (these courses are largely taught within the school but include selected 
university courses as well): (3) studio courses providing the arena in which students apply 
their skills and knowledge to problems that are both real and theoretical. These synthetic 
activities are time intensive and are fundamental to design education. 

After the common experience in first year, these studios relate to the student's declared 
disciplinary major. The flexibility of this curriculum plan affords the student the opportun- 
ity to concentrate in a single discipline but facilitates his or her contact with other design 
principles. The curriculum reflects the reality of the environmental marketplace— where, 
in addition to their faculty mentors, our students are exposed to a broad range of design 
professionals— through guest lectures, juries, projects and workshops. 

(Graduate studies are also offered in architecture, landscape architecture and product 
design. See the Graduate Catalog for information on the Master's programs. 



DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 

Associate Professor C. E. Joyner, Head of the Department 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: C. D. Cox, M. Pause 

Profexnorx.M. Pause. E. W. Taylor: Professors Emeriti: G. L. Bireline. J. H. Cox, D. R. Stuart; Associate Professors: C. Cox. 
B. Schulman. S. Toplikar. S. Wilchins: Assistant Professors: L. M. Diaz. M. Porter. D. Raymond. 

In the Bachelor of Environmental Design degree, design is used as the vehicle for a 
broadly based, multidisciplinary undergraduate education experience which fully utilizes 
the range of diverse faculty capabilities. Through flexible curriculum structure and course 
sequencing, students are able to assemble optional learning paths which meet their indi- 
vidual needs. This degree provides an alternative for students who have specific interests 
and capabilities outside the school's existing degree tracks and students who desire a 
broader design education taking advantage of the range and diversity of the school's 
offerings. Additionally, a concentration in Fibers and Surface Design is available within 
this program. Those students selecting the Bachelor of Environmental Design degree may 
wish to use it as a foundation for later graduate study in a specific design discipline. 

The Department of Design firmly believes that there is an essential need for students in a 
research and technically based university to engage in course work that fosters creative 
thinking. To meet this need, the Department of Design offers a Minor in Design, available to 
majors in any field. Four specific tracks are currently available: fibers and surface design, 
painting, drawing, and sculpture. To complete the minor, 9 hours of prerequisites and 15 
hours of specified design courses are required. 

The Department of Design also provides a common first year experience for all students 
entering the School of Design. Design Fundamentals focuses on exposure to basic design 
concepts and provides a general introduction to the fields of design. 



130 



ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semexter Credits 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio I 6 DF 102 Desiprn Fundamentals Studio II 6 

ENCilll Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 Humanities and Social Sciences Elective* 3 

Humanities and Social Sciences Elective' 3 Mathematics' 4/3 

Mathematics' 4 Physical Education 1 

1? 16/17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio- 6 Studio^ 6 

Natural Science Elective^ 4 Natural Science Elective' 4 

Humanities and Social Sciences Elective* 3 Humanities and Social Sciences Elective* 3 

Core"- 3 Core'' 3 

Physical Education 1 Physical Education 1 

l7 17 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio- 6 Studio^ 6 

Humanities and Social Sciences Elective* 3 Humanities and Social Sciences Elective* 3 

Core' 3 Core* 3 

Core^ 3 Core* 3 



15 



Free Elective 3 

18 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Seinester Credits 

Studio^ 6 Studio" 6 

Core* 3 Core=' 3 

Core' 3 Core* 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

Is Is 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130* 

'Must includeonecalculuscourseandmay include any of the courses on the departmental listingof courses acceptable 

toward this requirement. 

-A minimum of six 400-series studios are required. No more than one studio may be taken in any semester. 
'Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer science courses. For 

further clarification, see departmental listing of courses acceptable toward this requirement. 
*The University requires 18 hours in the humanities/social sciences area, a minimum of six hours in social sciences and 

six hours in humanities. The remaining courses are not limited to any specific department. For further clarification. 

see the departmental listing of courses applicable toward this requirement. 
*Each student is required to take a minimum of .'W credit hours which are to be selected from the six cores (Graphics and 

Communications. Behavior. Environment. History and Philosophy. Physical Elements and Systems, and Methods and 

Management). A student pursuing a degree in this department must have a Design faculty member as an advisor. 

*In order to receive two degrees from the School of Design, a student must complete 30 credit hours above the 129 hour 
requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studios and 12 credits in core courses above those 
described above. 

MINOR IN DESIGN 

Before entering into a minor in the Department of Design, students must first complete 9 
hours of prerequisite courses which provide an essential foundation in design: 
DF 111— Two-Dimensional Design for Non-Design Majors 
DF 112— Three-Dimensional Design for Non-Design Majors 
DN 311-F— Drawing 



131 



To complete the minor program, students will take 15 hours of design courses, 12 hours of 
which must be above the 100 level, at least 6 of which must be at the 300 level or above. Four 
specific tracks are available in the minor: fibers and surface design, painting, drawing, and 
sculpture. Courses are chosen from a list of recommended courses in each track in consulta- , 
tion with the adviser. Application forms may be obtained from the department head. Each 
student will be assigned an adviser consistent with his/her track selection. 



ARCHITECTURE 

Brook.s Hall 

Professor Robert P. Burns, Head of the Department 

Alumni Distinguished Und£rgraduate Professor: V. F. Shogren 

ProfuKora: P. Batchelor. G. Bizios. R. H. Clark. J. T. Regan, G. J. P. Reuer. H. Sanoff, V. Shogren; Professors Eviertt, H 
H. Harris: Amoctate Professors: F. Harmon, W. Place. J. P. Rand. L. Sanders. J. 0. lector, P. Tesar; Adjur^t Assoc mt, 
Professor: E. F. Harris. Jr.: Associate Professor Emeritus: D. W. Barnes: Assistant Professor: F. Rifki: Adjunct Lecturer:i 
T. C. Howard. 

In a world of changing social and cultural conditions, economics, technology, urbaniza-; 
tion and aesthetic consciousness, the central task of the architect remains— to give mean-| 
ingful form to the physical environment. However, these rapid changes force today's! 
architects to look at their world differently than did earlier generations. Modern architects! 
must concern themselves not only with traditional design issues, but also with such emerg-t 
ing concerns as the preservation and adaptive use of older buildings and neighborhoods,! 
energy conservation, and the form of rapidly expanding urban centers. The aesthetic 
revolution of the past few decades has freed architects from the rigidity of earlier theory, 
allowing greater diversity and expressiveness in architectural design. 

The architecture curriculum balances professional studies with a broad general educa-j 
tion. University requirements in mathematics, English, natural science, social sciences and! 
humanities are integrated with architectural design studios and a rich selection of designj 
support courses. Central to the curriculum is the design studio— a working laboratory inj 
which analysis and synthesis become real and meaningful activities to the architecture 
student. 

To address the diversity of roles and responsibilities in architecture, the Department of 
Architecture offers several curricula. The undergraduate Bachelor of Environmental 
Design in Architecture stresses the education of the individual and serves as the foundation' 
for advanced study in the discipline. The first year is spent on design fundamentals in aj 
curriculum common to all students in the School of Design. In the following years students] 
receive a broad introduction to architectural theory, history, technology and design process! 
while exploring other educational opportunities within the university. 

Following this pre-professional program students may continue their studies in either of! 
two professional programs— the one-year, post-graduate Bachelor of Architecture or thei 
two-year Master of Architecture program (see the NCSU Graduate Catalog for informa- 
tion on the latter program). Entry into both advanced programs is competitive: and, to be 
accepted, students must demonstrate potential for professional accomplishment, capability 
in design, and satisfy a specific set of professionally-oriented undergraduate course 
requirements. Many students spend one or more years gaining professional experience in 
architecture firms or related fields before pursuing the advanced degrees. 

Educational enrichment is an important characteristic of the architectural program. 
The School of Design regularly presents public lectures by leading professionals and 
exhibitions of design and art work. Electives are available in related disciplines— painting,! 
sculpture, photography, landscape architecture, product and visual design. Further design 
exposure is available through a variety of foreign study programs and field trips to 
buildings and urban centers of architectural interest. 



132 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates with the pre-professional Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture 
degree pursue careers in private architectural practice, building construction, develop- 
ment, and public agencies. North Carolina and many other states are increasingly restrict- 
ing professional licensing in architecture to holders of accredited advanced degrees such as 
the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master of Architecture. This educational requirement 
must be followed by three years of professional experience and completion of a comprehen- 
sive examination to qualify for professional certification as an architect. 

ARCHITECTURE CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Architecture 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Fall Semester Credit'! Spring Semester Credits 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio I 6 DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio II 6 

ENGlll Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 Humanities/Social Sciences Elective* 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective' 3 Mathematics' 3-4 

Mathematics' ^ Physical Education ■■■■ 1 

le 16-17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio^ 6 Studio^ 6 

Core* 3 Core 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective* 3 Humanities/Social Sciences Elective* 3 

Natural Science Elective^ 4 Natural Science Elective^ 4 

Physical Education ■_!_ Physical Education ^ 

1? 17 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio^ 6 Studio^ 6 

Core^ 3 Core^ 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective* 3 Humanities/Social Sciences Elective* _3 

Free Elective 3 j5 

Is 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Studio^ 6 Studio^ 6 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Core* 3 Core* 3 

Free elective 3 Free elective 3 

Is Is 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 1291* 

'Must include one calculus course and may include any of the courses on the departmental listing of courses acceptable 

towards this requirement. 
-A minimum of six 400 series studios are required withaminimumof four of the six being ARC. No more than one studio 

may be taken in any semester. 
'Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer science courses. For further 

clarification, see departmental listing of courses acceptable towards this requirement. 
"The university requires 18 hours in social science/humanities area. The courses are not limited to any specific 

department but are to show a distribution between the social sciences and humanities. For further clarification, see the 

departmental listing of courses acceptable towards this requirement. 
*Each student is required to take a minimum of 30 credit hours which are to be selected from the six cores (Graphics and 

Communications. Behavior. Environment, History and Philosophy. Physical Elements and Systems, and Methods and 

Management). 
*In order to receive two degrees from the School of Design, a student must complete 30 credit hours above the 129 hour 

requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studios and 12 credits in core courses above those 

described above. 



133 



ARCHITECTURE CURRICULUM (Fifth Year) 

Degree: Bachelor of Architecture 

The prcrcqu {sites for entry into the fifth year are: 

Credits 
42 



30 



University Requirements 

Free Electives 

Studios 

DF 101. 102 l^ 

ARC 400 f; 

ARC 400 or other 400 level studios ^-^ 

Core Courses 

Must include the following courses: 

History of Design (DN 141 or 142 or ARC 244) 3 

Structures (ARC 2.")1. :«1. ;}52) 9 

Architectural Materials (ARC 254) 3 

Environ. Control Systems (ARC 253) 3 

Desiirn Methods (ARC 261) 3 

The Profession of Architecture (ARC 263) 1 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 129 

The fifth year requirements are: 

Studios (ARC 501. 502) 12 

Site Planning (LAR 430) 3 

Architectural Construction Systems (ARC 432) 3 

History (ARC 441 or 447. or 448) 3 

Professional Practice (ARC 561) 3 

Elective from 400 or 500 level (ARC) courses in School of Design 6 

Fifth Year Minimum Hours _^ 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 159 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Profeasor A. R. Rice, Head of the Department 

Pnfexxorx: R. C. Moore. R. R. Wilkinson; Profexnorx Emeriti: R. E. Stipe. E. G. Thurlow: Axsociate Profesxorx: A. R. 
Abbate. D. W. Dalton. D. Wood: Axxixlant Profexxor: F. Magallanes: Axxociate Members of the faculty: W. E. Hooker. J. 
C. Raulston. M. K. Traer (Horticultural Science). 

Landscape architecture is the profession concerned with location, design, and develop- 
ment of residential, commercial, institutional, recreational and other community land uses. 
Preservation and conservation of visual amenities, unique natural areas, and historic 
resources, are important components of landscape architecture. The student studies history 
of landscape architecture, planting design, materials and construction, site planning, 
graphic communication and community design. These subjects are applied to actual design 
problems in landscape architecture studios. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

There are approximately 80,000 practicing landscape architects in the U.S. and growth is 
projected .a.s among the "Top Ten for the Eighties," by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. 
Landscape architects are employed by private firms and by agencies of government such as 
parks and recreation, forestry, and planning and environmental protection. Many pursue 
graduate degrees, qualifying them for careers in college teaching and more advanced 
assignments. 



134 



LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Landscape Architecture 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio I 6 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective- 3 

Mathematics Elective' 4 

17 

Spring Semester Credit 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio II 6 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Math Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Landscape Concentration'' 3 

Natural Science Elective^ 4 

Studio^ 6 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 
Spring Semester Credits 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Natural Science Elective' 4 

Studio* 6 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Advised Elective' 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Free Elective 3 

Spring Semester Credits 

Advised Elective* 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Studio* 6 

Free Elective 3 

li 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits 

Advised Elective* 3 

Advised Elective* 3 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Free Elective 3 

li 

Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Landscape Concentration' 3 

Studio* 6 

Free Elective 3 

Is 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 130' 

' May include any of the courses on the departmental listing of courses acceptable towards this requirement. 

^The university requires 18 hours in humanities/social science area. The courses are to show a distribution between the 

social sciences and humanities. For further clarification, see the departmental listing of courses acceptable towards 

this requirement. 
'Must include BS 100 or BO 200. The second science requirement may be met by taking 4 credit hours from the 

following courses: SSC 200 or MEA 101 or MEA 110 or MEA 120. 

* Landscape Concentrations: 27 credit hours required which must include the following courses (15 credit hours): LAR 
430. LAR 457. LAR 433. LAR 443 or LAR 444, and HS 211 or HS 212. The remaining 12 credit hours may be chosen 
from: HS 211 or HS 212, HS 342. HS 416, DN 221, DN 222, DN 421, DN 423, LAR 495, DN 495, SSC 200. SSC 361. 
MEA 101, ME A 1 10 or 120, MEA 208, MEA 300, BO 360, HS 531 or any LAR 500 level course open to undergraduate 
students. 

* A minimum of four 400 level studios are required with a minimum of 3of the 4 being LAR 400; however, one of the LAR 
400 studios may be satisfied by HS 400. Studios may be taken any time during the final six semesters: however, no more 
than one studio may be taken in any semester. 

'Advised electives are to be selected in consultation with the student's advisor. Six hours of the required twelve must 

include courses from one of the programs within the School of Design. They may not include credit for military science 

(AS, MS), music (MUS) below 200 level, or physical education. 
'In order to receive two degrees from the School of Design, a student must complete 30 credit hours above the 130 

requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studio and 12 credits in landscape concentration from 

courses described above. 



135 



PRODUCT/VISUAL DESIGN 

Brooks Hall 

Professor Haiff Khachatoorian, Head of the Department 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: V. M. Foote 

Profexsor: M. Davis. V. M. Foote. A. Lowrey; Associate Professors: A. V. Cooke. M. Lange. P. L. Middleton. S. Wilchins, J. 
Wittkamp; Adjunct Assocmle Professor: A. Merino; Assistant Professors: S. Ater. A. Kallish. 

Upon completion of design fundamentals requirements, the student selecting the Pro- 
duct/Visual Design Department elects as a major area of concentration either product or 
visual design. Product Design is concerned with all the human aspects of machine-made 
products and their relationship to the environment. This design discipline is often referred • 
to as industrial design. The designer is responsible for the product's human factors engi-, 
neering. safety, shape, color, texture, maintenance and cost. Product design deals with 
consumer as well as industrial products. In order to achieve these ends, designers must be 
involved in three major design and research activities: human behavior; the human- 
machine relationship; and the product itself. 

Areas of design investigation include furniture, housewares, appliances, transportation, 
tools, farm equipment, medical/electronic instruments, recreational support equipment 
and others. 

Graduates with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Product Design have career] 
opportunities in three general areas: corporate design offices in manufacturing companies, 1 
independent consulting offices, or governmental agencies. 

Visual Design, often referred to as graphic design, is concerned with all aspects of visual 
communication. The increasing importance of communication in our society has created a 
demand for designers, who have operational knowledge and creative abilities in various 
visual media. The elements of this field were historically found in various crafts/skills, 
commercial and production art. These have been integrated into a new design discipline; 
and the scope of educational development includes typography, photography, illustration, 
printing, production materials and methods. The applications include publication design 
(books, pamphlets and brochures), package design, sign and symbol design, advertising 
design (including newspapers, magazines, television and cinema), exhibit and display 
design. To achieve a broader view of the environment, the discipline analyzes the visual 
character of our urban environment and its relation to social and behavioral functions, and 
explores visual solutions to socially defined problems. Through a broad range of creative 
experiences, the student develops an understanding of the elements and principles of 
organization common to all visual communication. 

Graduates with a Bachelor of Environmental Design in Visual Design have career 
opportunities in professional design offices, corporate design offices, advertising agencies, 
corporations involved in printing, production, media development and communication. 

Within the Product/Visual Design Department, there is an additional concentration — 
Textile Design. Courses in this concentration are offered by both the School of Design and 
the College of Textiles. The program provides a strong awareness of the constraints of the 
textile industry and the requirements of the retail trade through appropriate project work, 
seminars and associated field trips. While offering a good general education that incorpo- 
rates aesthetics, technology and economics in the context of a particular industry, the 
concentration is particularly appropriate for people who wish to become practicing textile 
designers, either in an industrial setting or in private practice. 



136 



PRODUCT DESIGN CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Product Design 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits 

DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio I 6 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Math Elective' ^ 

16 
Spring Semester Credits 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio II 6 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Math Elective' 4-3 

Physical Education 1 

16-17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 

Cores 

Cores 

Core* 

Humanities/Soc. Sci 



Credits 

3 

3 

3 

Elective* 3 



Studio^ ^ 

18 
Spring Semester Credits 

Core* 3 

Core* 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Studio^ ^ 

15 
SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits 

Core* 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Studio^ 6 

Free Elective • 3 

15 
Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Studio^ 6 

Free Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 129^ 



Fall Semester Credits 

FD 255 Contemp. Mfg. Processes I^ 3 

PD 318 Ideation P 3 

Natural Science Elective' 4 

Studio^ 6 

Physical Education 1 

17 
Spring Semester Credits 

PD 256 Contemp. Mfg. Processes IP 3 

PD 418 Ideation IP 3 

Natural Science Elective' 4 

Studio^ 6 

Physical Education 1 

17 

'Must include one calculus course and may include any of the courses on the departmental listing of courses acceptable 

towards this requirement. 
2A minimum of six 400 series studios are required with a minimum of four of the six being PD. No more than one studio 

may be taken in any semester. 
'Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer science courses. For further 

clarification, see departmental listing of courses acceptable towards this requirement. 
*The university requires 18 hours in humanities/social science area. At least 6 of the 18 hours must be in humanities and 

at least 6 of the 18 must be in social sciences. For further clarification, see the departmental listing of courses acceptable 

towards this requirement. 
^Each student is required to take a minimum of 30 credit hours which are to be selected from the six cores (Graphics and 

Communications. Behavior, Environment, History and Philosophy, Physical Elements and Systems, and Methods and 

Management). Note: PD 255, 256, 318. and 418 are required as part of the 30 credit hours. A student in this program 

must have a product design faculty member as an advisor. 
'In order to receive two degrees from the School of Design, a student must complete 30 credit hours above the 129 hour 

requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studio and 12 credits in core courses above those 

described above. 

VISUAL DESIGN CURRICULUM 

Degree: Bachelor of Environmental Design in Visual Design 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



DF 101 Design Fundamentals Studio I 6 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Math Elective' 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

DF 102 Design Fundamentals Studio II 6 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Math Elective' 4-3 

Physical Education Elective ■■■ 1 

17-16 



137 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semetier Credits Spring Semester Credits | 

VD 217 Typography I' 3 VD 317 Typography IP 3 i 

VD 455 Visual Desi^ Mafls & Proc. I' 3 VD 456 Visual Design Mafls & Proc. IP 3 

Natural Science Elective' 4 Natural Science Elective' 4 

Studio' 6 Studio^ 6 I 

Physical Education Elective ^ Physical Education Elective M. j 

17 17 i 

JUNIOR YEAR ] 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Cor«» 3 Core* 3 

Core* 3 Core' 3 

Cf^ 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 

Huinanili«/Soc. Sci. Elective* 3 Studio^ _6 

Studio* ^ 15 

18 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Cof^ 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. JElective* 3 Studio^ 6 

Studio* 6 Free Elective 3 

Free Elective ^ Free Elective _3 

15 15 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 129* 

'Must include one calculus course and may include any of the courses on the departmental listing of courses acceptable 
towards this requirement. 
-A minimum of six 400 series studios are required with a minimum of four of the six being VD. No more than one studio 

may be taken in any semester. 

'Selected from natural, physical, or biological sciences, but not to include math or computer science courses. For further 
clarification, see departmental listing of courses acceptable towards this requirement. 

•The university requires 18 hours in social science/humanities area. The courses are not limited to any specific 
department but are to show a distribution between the social sciences and humanities. For further clarification, see the 
departmental listing of courses acceptable towards this requirement. 

'Each student is required to take a minimum of 30 credit hours which must include VD 217, 317, 455, and 456. The 
remaining 18 credits are to be selected from the six cores (Graphics and Communications, Behavior. Environment, 
History and Philosophy, Physical Elements and Systems, and Methods and Management). A student in this program 
must have a visual design faculty member as an advisor. 

«In order to receive two degrees from the School of Design, a student must complete 30 credit hours above the 129 hour 
requirement. These 30 hours are to include 18 credits in 400 level studio and 12 credits in core courses beyond those 
described above. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 
AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Poe Hall 

J. J. Michael, Dean 

H. A. Exum. Attsociate Dean 

R. T. Williams, dissociate Dean 

C. K. Jones, Director of Teacher Education 

A. P. Smith, Director of Student Services 

The College of Education and Psychology is concerned with the problems of human 
development from both psychological and educational perspectives. With emphases upon 
the preparation of middle grades, secondary, and post-secondary teachers, counselors, 



138 



I 



supervisors, administrators and psychologists, the college seeks students who are dedicated 
to the improvement of human beings through education and service and who are sensitive to 
the complexity of teaching/learning processes. The college is composed of the Departments 
of Adult and Community College Education, Counselor Education, Curriculum and 
Instruction. Educational Leadership and Program Evaluation, Mathematics and Science 
Education, Occupational Education and Psychology. 

Undergraduate degree programs are offered in agricultural education, education 
general studies, health occupations education, marketing education for teachers, mathe- 
matics education, science education, technical education, technology education, vocational 
industrial education, and psychology. In addition to being admitted to a curriculum, all 
teacher education candidates must meet program requirements for admission to candidacy 
in teacher education (including a 2.500 or higher overall grade point average after the 
sophomore year) and for admission to student teaching (including a 2.500 or higher GPA 
overall and in one's teaching field). 

Graduates of the undergraduate programs in education receive a Bachelor of Science 
degree in education, and normally qualify for an "A" certificate to teach in their chosen 
field. Graduates of the undergraduate program in psychology receive a Bachelor of Arts in 
Psychologv' degree. 

Seven degree programs (agricultural education, health occupations education, technol- 
ogy education, marketing education for teachers, mathematics education, science educa- 
tion, and vocational industrial education) named in the preceding paragraph lead to 
certification to teach in grades 9-12. In addition, the College of Education and Psychology 
offers middle grades degree programs (and certification for grades 6-9) with concentra- 
tions in language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies. Students seeking this 
certification will graduate with one or two fields of concentration. All teacher education 
graduates also complete the equivalent of a second major, outside of education. 

Professional education courses are provided for those students enrolled in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences who wish to become teachers of secondary English, 
French, Spanish, and social studies, with certification for grades 9-12. In the Humanities 
and Social Sciences section of this catalog, see the areas describing the teacher education 
options. Students enrolled in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences or in science and 
mathematics departments may double-major in the College of Education and Psychology 
and also obtain a North Carolina secondary teacher's certificate. 

Most of the college's teacher education programs are in fields of teacher shortage. 
Graduates have little difficulty finding teaching positions. Because of limited faculty 
resources, space in several programs is limited. 

Most of the education and psychology disciplines listed in the following pages also offer 
graduate-level curricula. In addition, the College of Education and Psychology has gradu- 
ate programs in: 

Adult and Community College Education Middle Grades Education 

Counselor Education Occupational Education 

Curriculum and Instruction Reading Education 

Education Administration Special Education 

See the Graduate Catalog or contact faculty members for information on master's and 
doctoral programs. 

Public school sixth-year (intermediate) certification programs are available in agricul- 
tural, occupational, and vocational industrial education; curriculum and instruction and 
supervision; administration; counseling; reading education; special education; mathemat- 
ics and science education; and school psychology. All of the bachelor's level and graduate 
level certification programs are approved by the North Carolina State Board of Education. 
All of the teacher education programs are accredited by the National Council for the 
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). 

The modern College of Education and Psychology building is named Poe Hall. It includes 
a Learning Resources Library, a Center for Learning Technologies, and an Instructional 
Computing Facility. The building houses laboratories for technology, reading, science, 
psychology, and guidance and testing activities, as well as a children's play area with an 
observation room. 



139 



SCHOLARSHIPS 

The College of Education and Psychology has a scholarship program distinct from the 
campus Merits Awards Program. Over 20 scholarships are awarded to undergraduates 
each year, including several scholarships reserved for minority students. 

North Carolina State University is one of 13 institutions participating in the N.C. 
Teaching Fellows Program and lias over 250 teaching fellows enrolled. Each fellow 
receives $5,000 per year for four years, in exchange for a commitment to teach for four 
years in the state. 

Other students hold the prestigious Paul Douglas Scholarship, or receive awards through 
the State Board of Education's Scholarship Loan Fund for Prospective Teachers and other 
sources. High school counselors receive information about, and applications for. all of these 
scholarships and awards. 

SCHOLARS AND HONORS PROGRAMS 

The College of Education and Psychology participates in the University Scholars Pro- 
gram, in which selected students each year participate in weekly activities that broaden 
and deepen their university experiences. The Psychology and Occupational Education 
Departments offer an optional curriculum for honors students. There is an honors society in 
psycholog\'. 

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Several faculty members have been involved in overseas projects, in China, Japan, Peru, 
Puerto Rico, and Sri Lanka. Some of the foreign language teacher education students spend 
a year in France or Spain in an exchange program. The enrollment of international 
students in the several education and psychology programs, and elsewhere at N. C. State. 
also offers multi-cultural opportunities without one's leaving the campus. 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Poe Hall (Room 602) 

Associate Professor L. R. Jewell, Coordinator of Advising 

Profexsor: G. E. Moore: Professors Emeriti: J . K. Coster, C. C. Scarborough: Associate Professors Emeriti: C. D. Bryant, J. 
R. riary. T. R. Miller: Assistant Professors: J . L. Flowers, B. H. Kirby. 

Agricultural education, in its broadest sense, encompasses areas of study which will 
enable one to participate effectively in planning, promoting and initiating educational 
programs in agriculture. A program leads to a Bachelor of Science degree and is designed 
to prepare teachers of vocational agriculture in the secondary schools, and in technical and 
community colleges. The demand for agricultural education teachers exceeds present 
supply. Graduates who obtain certification in the bachelor's program generally have a 
choice of positions in the Carolinas, Virginia, and throughout the nation. 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

REQUIREMENTS 

Majnr Futfl of Study Credits 

A NS 2()0 Introduction to Animal Science or PO 201 Poultry Science and Production 4 

BAE 201 Shop Procedures and Management 3 

FOR 252 Introduction to Forest Science 3 

ssc 200 Soil Science !!!!!!'.!!!'.!!!!!.'!!.'!.'!!!!!!!!! 4 

Plant Science Elective (Select from approved list of courses) 3 

17 



140 



Professional Education 

ECI 451 Improving Reading in Secondary Schools 2 

ELP 344 School and Society " 3 

EOE 101 Introduction to Occupational Education 1 

EOE 207 Introduction to Teaching Occupational Education 3 

EOE 322 Contemporary Vocational Agriculture 3 

EOE 424 Planning Educational Programs 3 

EOE 426 Methods of Teaching Agriculture 3 

EOE 427 Student Teaching in Agriculture 8 

EOE 492 Senior Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 

27 

English Courses 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

6 

Mathematics Courses 

Mathematics (but not 101 or 111), Logic, or Statistics Electives 6 

Humanities and Social Science Courses 

EB 201 Economics I or EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 376 Developmental Psychology or PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology or SOC 241 Sociology of Agriculture and Rural Society 3 

SOC 305 Racial and Ethnic Relations 3 

Communication Elective 3 

History Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

24 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

Chemistry Elective 4 

8 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 9 

13 

Agricultural Specialty or Acfrmiltural Electives 3-6 

Concentrations 

(Students are to select one concentration and complete the requirements as listed below) 18-24 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 128-129 

ANIMAL SCIENCE 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science 4 

ANS 204 Feeds and Feeding 4 

ANS 310 Basic Horse Husbandry 3 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management or ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management 3 

ANS 403 Swine Management or ANS 410 Horse Science 3 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3 

ZO 201 General Zoology 4 

24 
BOTANY 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

BO 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 1 

BO 400 Plant Diversity 4 

BO 403 Systematic Botany 4 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs 3 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

22 



141 



COMMUNICATION* 

AC :n 1 Communication Methods and Media 3 

AC 470 Agricultural Communications ^ 

COM (SP» 1 10 F'ublic Speakinjf ^ 

COM (SP) 201 Theories of Persuasive Communication ^ 

COM (SP) 226 Introduction to Public Relations f 

COM (SP» 326 Public Relations Applications ^ 

COM (SP) 446 Problems in Public Relations 3 

COM (SP) 456 Oriranizational Communication _3 

24 

ECONOMICS 

EB 303 Farm Management 3 

EB 306 Agricultural Law or EB 307 Business Law 3 

EB 31 1 Afrricultural Markets 3 

EB 313 Markelintr Methods 3 

EB 415 Farm Appraisal and Finance 3 

EB 475 Comparative Economic Systems 3 

Economics Elective ^ 

21 

HORTICULTURAL SCIENCE 

HO 201) Plant Life 4 

HS 201 Principles of Horticulture 3 

HS 301 Plant Propatration 4 

HS 371 Interior Plantscapes 3 

HS 411 Nursery Manajfement 3 

HS 431 Vetfetable Production 4 

HS 440 Greenhouse Management 3 

24 

SOCIOLOGY 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology 3 

SOC 204 Sociology of Family 3 

SOC 205 Work: Occupations and Professions 3 

SOC 301 Human Behavior 3 

SOC 311 Community Relations 3 

SOC 425 Juvenile Delinquency 3 

18 

ZOOLOGY 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

BO 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

BO 365 Ecology Lab 1 

ZO 201 General Zoology 4 

ZO 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

ZO 303 Vertebrate Zoology 4 

ZO 353 Wildlife Management 3 

22 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION EDUCATION CONCENTRATION 

The Agricultural Education/Agricultural Extension option is designed to prepare indi- 
viduals for extension agent positions. It is offered as a program track under the existing 
Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Education. Students are required not only to 
engage in classroom and laboratory studies on the North Carolina State University cam- 
pus, but also to engage in a closely supervised practicum in the field. Students will be 
required to complete a ten-week field work experience in an extension office during their 
sophomore year and a full-semester practicum experience during their senior year. 



•Note: Communication Concentration is not approved for Teacher Certification. 

142 



REQUIREMENTS 

Major Field of Study Credits 

AC 311 Communication Methods and Media 3 

BAE 201 Shop Procedures and Management 3 

EB 303 Farm Management 3 

FOR 252 Introduction to Forest Science 3 

SSC 321 Water Management 4 

Animal Science or Poultry Science Elective (Select from approved list) 4 

Plant Science Elective (Select from approved list) 3 

23 

Professional Education 

EAC 478 Extension as Non-Formal Education 3 

EOE 101 Introduction to Occupational Education 1 

EOE 226 Applications of Instructional Technology in Agricultural Education 3 

EOE 307 Field Work in Occupational Education 3 

EOE 323 Leadership Development in Agriculture 3 

EOE 422 Public Relations in Agriculture 3 

EOE 423 Practicum in Agricultural Extension/Industry 8 

EOE 426 Methods of Teaching Agriculture 3 

EOE 492 Senior Seminar in Agricultural Education 1 

28 

English Courses 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

6 

Mathematics Courses 

Mathematics (but not 101 or 111), Logic, or Statistics Electives 6 

Humanities and Social Scieiice Courses 

PS 201 Introduction to American Government 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

EB 201 Economics I or EB 212 Economics of Agriculture 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology or SOC 241 Sociology of Agriculture and Rural Society 3 

Communication Elective 3 

History Elective 3 

Humanities Elective (Select from approved courses) 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Science Elective (Select from approved courses) 3 

27 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 1 1 1 Foundations of Chemistry or PY 211 General Physics 4 

8 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 9 

13 

Agricultural Electives 6 

Agricultural Specialty 12 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 129 



143 



EDUCATION, GENERAL STUDIES 

Poe Hall (Room 608) 

Associate Professor R. C. Serow, Coordinator of Advising 

The Education. General Studies program has three areas of emphasis which serve the 
needs of the following groups of students: 1) those students who wish to seek a teaching 
certificate in fields not offered at North Carolina State University, but at another institu- 
tion: 2) those students who wish to work in fields which do not require certification; e.g., 
employee in juvenile home, residential school, state or local education-related agencies, or a 
paraprofessional in schools: and 3) those students enrolled in a teacher education program 
at North Carolina State University whose career goals in education have changed. Students 
enrolled in a teacher education program, upon the recommendation of their department 
and approval of the College of Education and Psychology's Associate Dean for Academic 
Affairs, may transfer to this program. 

REQUIREMENTS 
GENERAL STUDIES CredUs 
Communication ShitUi 9 

English composition (ENG 111.112) 

Communication (one course) 

Humanities 18 

Histor>(HI205and233) 

Fine Arts (at least one course) 

Literature (English or American; at least one course) 

Philosophy (PHI 205) 

Social Sciencei> 12 

Political Science or Economics (two-course sequence) 
Psychology ( PS Y 200) 
Sociology (SOC 202) 

Natural Sciences 7-8 

Includes at least one laboratory course 

Mathematics 6-7 

One mathematics course and an elective from mathematics, 
statistics, or computer science; but not MA 101 and MA 111 

Physical Education 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 
Three one-credit activity courses 

Eleciixts 10-13 

66-71 

MAJOR Credits 

( 'itre Courses: 

Introductory Course 3-4 

EOE 101 and .365.' or 101 and 322,* or EMS 203. or ECI 205 

ELP 201 Alternative Education Agencies 3 

ELP :i-14 School and Society 3 

ELP 496 Special Topics in Education: General Studies 3 

PSY .'104 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 376. 475. or 476 '..'..'.'.'.'..'.'.'.'.'..'.'. 3 

18-19 

F'.mphasis 1 (Certification in teaching area not at N.C. State University) 

(XiM (SP) 213 Oral InterpreUtion of Literature 3 

ECI 483 Introduction to Media and Instructional Technology 3 

PSY 310 or ,320 ! .... 3 

Courses per agreement to be Uken at a cooperating institution 18 

Restricted Elective* (An approved sequence in ED or PSY) 12 

"39 



144 



Emphasis 2 (Noneertified position in education or related occupations) 

COM (SP) 112 Interpersonal Communication 3 

ECI 483 Introduction to Media and Instructional Technology 3 

PSY 310 or 320 3 

SOC 305 and 31 1 6 

SOC 418 Sociolog:y of Education 3 

Restricted Electives (An approved sequence in ED or PSY) 21 

~39 

Emphasis 3 (Transfer from teacher certification to general studies program without certification) 

Teaching field 30 

Supporting courses 9 

^39 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 126 

*These courses must be taken in sequence, with a total of 4 credits. 



ENGLISH TEACHER EDUCATION 

Associate Professor R. J. Pritchard, Coordinator of English Education 

Assistant Professor C. A. Pope 

Students desiring to become secondary English teachers in grades 9-12 will be enrolled in 
the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. In that college's section of this Catalog, 
curriculum requirements for the teacher education option can be found under English. 
Students desiring to become language arts teachers in grades 6-9 will be enrolled in the 
College of Education and Psychology. For details, consult the Middle Grades Education 
description. 

FRENCH TEACHER EDUCATION 

Assistant Professor L. Salstad, Coordinator of Advising 

Lecturer D. Adler, Assistant Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become teachers of French will be enrolled in the College of Human- 
ities and Social Sciences. In that college's section of this Catalog, curriculum requirements 
for the teacher education option in French can be found under Foreign Languages and 
Literatures. 



GRAPHIC COMMUNICATIONS 

Poe Hall (Room 510) 

Lecturer G. K. Hilliard, Jr., Coordinator, Graphic Communications 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: J. L. Crow 

Assistant Professorf!: J . L. Crow, W. J. VanderWall; Lecfurers.T. J. Branoff, J. F. Freeman, G. C. Gull, S. P. Markley, A. Y. 
Scales. E. N. Wiebe: Lecturer Emeritus: B. D. Webb. 

A 15-hour minor is offered in Graphic Communications. The minor is designed to develop 
proficiency in selecting and applying graphic techniques in both career and leisure activi- 
ties, to provide in-depth manual and computer graphics skills, and to enrich visual percep- 
tion and critical thought in graphic areas. For additional information, consult the Graphic 
Communications Program, 510 Poe Hall (737-2234). 

145 



HEALTH OCCUPATIONS TEACHER EDUCATION 

Poe Hall (Room 502) 

Associate Professor H. D. Akroyd, Coordinator of Advising 

Assii>tant Professor R. M. Patterson 

The Health Occupations Teacher Education curriculum is designed to prepare qualified 
teachers for health occupations programs in secondary schools, community colleges, public 
health agencies, hospitals, and other health industry positions. Health Occupations Teacher 
Education offers a two track curriculum: 1) a certification track for those who desire 
teaching positions in the public secondary schools: and 2) a non-certification track for those 
not obtaining state secondary certification, but who desire positions within the health 
industry requiring education and supervisory skills. Both curriculum tracks are for stu- 
dents who have already developed competency in a health care specialty. Thirty hours of 
equivalency credit is granted by validation of a current credential in a health occupations 
specialty by the American Dental Association, American Medical Association-Committee 
on Allied Health Education and Accreditation, National League for Nursing, or Council on 
Professional Accreditation. 

HEALTH OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

REQUIREMENTS 

MnJor Field of Study 

ECI 451 Improving Reading in Secondary Schools' ... 9 

ELP 344 School and Society' ". '.'^'^'/^'.y.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 3 

EOE 101 Introduction to Occupational Education 1 

EOE 207 Introduction to Teaching Occup. Educ' n 

cnir IQI u l.u n f : o 



EOE 331 Health Professions 

EOE 332 Health Promotion and Disease Prevention 



_ --^"..■" » • ^inwLiuii aiiu L'lotraat; r icveilLiOri o 

EOE 333 Health Care Delivery '.'.'.'.'.'.'..'. 3 

EOE 335 Planning Classroom and Clinical Curricula q 

EOE 336 Strategies of Teaching a Health Occupation . o 

EOE 338 Medical Law and Ethics '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. t 

EOE 433 Health Occupations Specialty Practicum^ 3 g 

EOE 4.34 Clinical Supervision in Health Occupations^ o 

EOE 436 Evaluative Skills in Teaching Health Occup 3 

EOE 4,37 Health Occupations Teaching Practicum^ 00 

Health Credential (Two years of education in an approved accredited health professions programV '. '. '. '. '.'.'.'.'.'..'. 30 

61-68 
English Coursex 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading t 

6 
Mathematics Courses 

MA Elective (not 101 or 111) 

M A ( not 101 or 1 1 1 ). Logic, or Statistics y.y............ .....'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.[.[ 3 

6 
Humanities and Social Sciences 

PSY ,304 Educational Psychology' 

PSY 376 Developmental Psychology or ^ 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development' . „ 

C ommunication Elective ^ 

H istory Elective* ^ 

Humanities/Social Science Electives' ^ 

Literature Elective* 12-18 

3 

27 
Natural Sciences 

Natural Science Electives 



146 



I 



Free Elect ives 

To meet minimum total hours required for graduation 9-16 

Minimum hours required for graduate 124 

'Required only in the certification track. 
-Required only in the non-certification track. 

Certification students must enroll for eight hours, non-certification students are required to have a minimum of three 
hours. 
'Courses must be at the 300-400 level for students in the certification track. 



INDUSTRIAL AND TECHNICAL EDUCATION 

Poe Hall (Room 502) 

Associate Professor R. E. Peterson, Coordinator of Advising 

Professor Emeriti: D. M. Hanson. J. T. Nerden: Associate Professor Emeritus: F. S. Smith: Assistant Professor Emeritus: 
T. C. Shore. 

The Industrial and Technical Education program offers curricula to prepare teachers, 
supervisors and administrators in trade and/or technical areas for the public schools, area 
vocational schools, community colleges and technical colleges. Completion of a four-year 
curriculum in vocational industrial education or technical education leads to the Bachelor 
of Science in education. The curricula are planned to provide students with broad cultural 
and professional backgrounds to parallel occupational experience. 

VOCATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in Vocational Industrial Education is designed to prepare Industrial 
Cooperative Training teachers for secondary schools and coordinators for post-secondary 
school cooperative education programs. Graduates who teach in secondary schools are also 
prepared to teach Introduction to Industrial Education, which is the entry-level Trade and 
Industrial Education orientation course in the public schools. These teachers prepare 
students for employment in a wide range of industries through a cooperative arrangement 
between the schools and employers where theory, related instruction, and coordination are 
provided by the school and practice is provided by industry. The VIE curriculum combines 
general education, professional education, and a range of technical education and other 
courses which help the prospective ICT teacher or coordinator to understand modern 
industry. This area is one which usually has a high demand for graduates of the program. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major Field of Study 
Academic 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

EB 202 Economics II 3 

EB 307 Introduction to Business Law 3 

EB 313 Marketing Methods 3 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 3 

EB 485 Management Development Seminar 3 

Economics Electives • 6 

24 

Technical 

EOE 496 Senior Seminar in Industrial and Occupational Education 2 

GC 120 Foundations of Graphics 3 

GC 200 Applied Computer Aided Drawing 3 

Technical Electives 1^ 

Is 



147 



Pn^eatitmal Education 

ECI 451 Improving Reading in Secondary Schools 2 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EOE 101 Introduction to Occupational Education 1 

EOE 207 Introduction to Teaching Occupational Education 3 

EOE 303 Administration and Supervision of Student Org 3 

EOE 365 Trade Analysis in Course Development 3 

EOE 404 Principles & Practices of Cooperative Education 3 

EOE 466 Methods of Teaching Voc. Industrial and Technical Education 3 

EOE 467 Student Teaching in Voc. Industrial and Technical Education 8 

"29 

EngtitM Courtes 

ENG 1 11 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Mathematics Coursex 

MA Elective (not 101 or 111) 3 

MA (not 101 or 111). Logic, or Statistics 3 

"e 

Humanitieg and Social Sciences 

PHI 314 Issues in Business Ethics 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 376 Developmental Psychology or 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

SOC 205 Work: Occupations and Professions 3 

Communication Elective 3 

History Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

21 

Natural Sciences 

CH 111 Foundations of Chemistry 4 

Physics Elective 4 

"s 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 9 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

TECHNICAL EDUCATION CURRICULUM 

The curriculum in technical etiucation prepares instructors in a range of technologies. A 
strong mathematics and physics foundation is required. A student enrolling in the techni- 
cal education curriculum may specialize in areas related to his/her technical preparation 
and/or previous work experience. Admission to the technical education curriculum is 
limited to students demonstrating proficiency in a given applied technology, i.e., electrical, 
electronics, mechanical, etc. Thus, the program is not open to high school graduates, who 
lack technical preparation and/or experience. Employment opportunities for technical 
education graduates include teaching in community and technical colleges and within 
industry as technical trainers and coordinators of training programs. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major Field of Study Credits 

GC 120 Foundations of Graphics Communications 3 

<;C 200 Applied Computer Aided Drawing 3 

EOE .301 Survey of Vocational Education 3 

Technical Education Elective 3 

Approved Electives' 15 

148 



Professional Education 

ECI 483 Introduction to Media and Instructional Technology 3 

EOE 452 Lab Planning in Technology Education 3 

EOE 101 Introduction to Occupational Education 1 

EOE 365 Trade Analysis in Course Development 3 

EOE 466 Methods of Teaching Vocational Industrial and Technical Education 3 

EOE 467 Student Teaching Vocational Industrial and Technical Education 8 

EOE 481 Introduction to Development Training 3 

EOE 496 Senior Seminar in Industrial and Technical Education 3 

"27 

English Courses 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

6 

Mathematics Courses 

MA 111 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry (credits do not count toward graduation) 3 

MA 141 Analytical Geometry and Calculus I 4 

MA 241 Analytical Geometry and Calculus II 4 

11 

Humanities and Social Science Courses 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

PS 201 Introduction to American Government 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

SOC 205 Work: Occupational & Professional 3 

Communication Elective 3 

History Elective 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

27 

Physical and Biological Sciences 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

PY 205 Physics for Engineers and Scientists I or 

PY 21 1 College Physics I 4 

PY 208 Physics for Engineers and Scientists II or 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

12 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 12 

le 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 123^ 

'Approved electives must be selected from engineering, engineering sciences, or physical sciences and related to stu- 
dent's specialization. 

^Students required to demonstrate proficiency in an applied technology (may be fulfilled by technical school training) 
prior to admission to the program. 



MARKETING EDUCATION FOR TEACHERS 

Associate Professor 3. L. Burrow, Coordinator of Advising 

The Marketing Education curriculum is specifically designed to prepare teachers for 
Marketing Education programs in secondary schools. In addition, it provides the necessary 
pedagogical and technical preparation needed by marketing instructors in community and 
technical colleges, as well as for selected training and development roles in business and 
industry. The combination of a broad general and professional education, business and 



149 



marketing courses, and supervised work experience in marketing jobs provides a unique 
preparation for educators in a rapidly expanding occupational area. 

REQUIREMENTS 

.V/.i^.r /-'i. Id ../ Study Credits 

Kconomics 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

EB 202 Economics 11 3 

EB :iO~ Business Law 1 3 

EB .113 MarkelinK Methods 3 

EB 326 Human Resource Manairement 3 

EB :ihO Economics and Business Statistics 3 

EB 460 Marketinir Research 3 

EB 400-level Elective 3 

Marketinir 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 

BUS 466 Sales Management 3 

BUS 467 Advertisinir and Sales Promotion 3 

BUS 468 Marketinir Management and Planning 3 

CSC 200 Introduction to Computers and Their Uses 3 

15 

ProftKsional Education 

ECI 451 Improving Reading in Secondary Schools 2 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EOE 101 Introduction to Occupational Education 1 

EOE 207 Introduction to Teaching Occupational Education 3 

EOE 241 Foundations of Marketing Education 2 

EOE 307 Field Work in Occupational Education 2-6 

EOE 346 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Marketing Education 3 

EOE 444 Administration of Marketing Education 3 

EOE 447 Student Teaching in Marketing Education 8 

EOE 494 Senior Seminar in Marketing Education 3 

30 

English Courses 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Mathematics Courses 

MA 1 14 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 3 

Mathematics (not 101 or 111). Statistics, or Logic Elective 3 

6 
Humanities and Social Science Courses 

PHI 314 Issues in Business Ethics 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 376 Human Growth and Development or 

PSY 476 Psychologj' of Adolescent Development 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

Communication Elective 3 

History Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Political Science Elective ' 3 

"24 

Natural Sciences 

Natural Science Electives with Lab g 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives ' g 

13 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 126 

150 



MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE 
EDUCATION 

Poe Hall (Room 326) 

Professor J. R. Kolb, Interim Head of the Department 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: N. D. Anderson, J. R. Kolb, L. W. Watson 

Pro/csxor.s; N. D. Anderson, L. M. Clark, J. R. Kolb: Professor Emeritm: H. E. Speeee; Associate ProfeKKora: L. V. Stiff, W. 
M. Waters, Jr., L. W. Watson, J. H. V^hezi\ey. Axxociate Profexxor Emeritus:)^. A. S\\3.nnor\; Axxixiant Professors: S. B. 
Berenson, K. S. Norwood. J. C. Park: Adjunct Assistant Profexxorx: R. R. Jones, C. M. Meek. W. E. Spooner. 

The Department of Mathematics and Science Education prepares undergraduate 
students to become teachers of mathematics and science. The department traditionally 
prepares competent professionals who have strong subject-matter backgrounds and peda- 
gogical skills. Departmental majors may seek certification for teaching secondary grades 
9-12 or middle grades 6-9. Students interested in teaching in the middle grades may select 
from mathematics or science as single concentrations, or a mathematics/science dual 
concentration earning double certification. Students in the 9-12 secondary curriculum in 
mathematics or science education may complete a double major and receive a second 
degree in mathematics or one of the sciences. All of the programs provide a broad back- 
ground in the natural sciences, social sciences and humanities; depth in mathematics or an 
area of science: and the development of professional competencies. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

One merit award is available in mathematics education. In addition, the Speeee Scholar- 
ship is awarded annually to as many as three outstanding juniors or seniors in either 
mathematics education or science education. The department sponsors a Mathematics and 
Science Education Club and recognizes the Outstanding Graduate in Mathematics Educa- 
tion and Science Education annually. 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 
(Grades 9-12 Certification) 

REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (54-57 semester hours) Credits 

English and Communication Courses 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Communication Elective 3 

9 

Humanities and Social Sciences Courses' 

History Elective 3 

Humanities Electives 6 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Science Electives 9 

21 

Science Courses 

Physical Science^ 8 

Natural Science Elective^ 3-4 

11-12 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives' 9-12 

13-16 



151 



Teachinir Major (42-45 semester hours) 

Ci.r. Coursfn Iretfuxrrd of all Mudents) 

CSC 101 Introduction to Profn-amming 3 

MA 141 Analytic lieometo' and Calculus I 4 

MA 225 Structure of the Real Number System or 

CSC (MA) 222 Applied Discrete Mathematics' 3 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry and Calculus 11 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometr>' and Calculus III 4 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometr>' 3 

PHI 201 Lojiric 3 

ST 101 Sutistics by Example _3 

27 
Sprfializations (choose one of these} 
Mathemaiicx 

MA 341 Applied Differential Equations I 3 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Alfrebra 3 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices 3 

MA 4:« History of Mathematics 3 

Math Elective* i^ 

15 

Computer Science 

CSC 102 Proirramming Concepts 3 

CSC 201 Basic Computer Organization and Assembly Language 3 

CSC 311 DaU Structures 3 

CSC 322 Discrete Mathematical Structures or 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 

CSC Elective 3 

MA 305 Elementary Linear Algebra or 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices 3 

Is 

Statislics 

MA 305 Elementary Linear Algebra or 

MA 405 Introduction to Linear Algebra and Matrices 3 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 

ST 301 Statistical Methods I 3 

ST 302 Statistical Methods II 3 

ST 421 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics I 3 

ST 422 Introduction to Mathematical Statistics II 3 

Is 

Professional Studies (required of all students) (31 semester hours) 

ECl 451 Improving Reading in the Secondary Schools 2 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EMS 101 Orientation to Mathematics and Science Education 

EMS 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 

EMS 470 Methods and Materials for Teaching Mathematics* 3 

EMS 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics' 8 

EMS 472 Teaching Mathematics Topics in Senior High' 3 

EMS 480 Teaching Mathematics with Microcomputers 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

IT 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

'The humanities and social science electives must be chosen from the university's official list of courses. Many courses in 
philosophy.religion, literature, fine arts, history, and foreign language are approved humanities courses. Many courses 
in economics, sociology, anthropology, political science, psychology, and geography are approved social science courses. 
Specified courses in other areas such as communication, education, design, and university studies also are approved as 
humanities or social sciences. Students are encouraged to select courses in this curriculum area so that each of these 
areas is represented: economics, governmental systems, social systems, and fine arts. 
'Must be a two-course sequence, with a laboratory, in chemistry or physics. 
■May be in biological sciences, physical sciences, or marine, earth and atmospheric sciences. 

'Student* in the mathematics specialization are required to take 12 hours, while those in computer science and statistics 
Sire required to lake 9 hours. 

'MA 225 is required in all specializations except Computer Science. 
•Mathematics elective must be at 200 level or above, or MA 105. 

These courses are taken together as a block and completed prior to student teaching. Student teaching is full-time for ten 
weeks during the fall semester. 



152 



SCIENCE EDUCATION CURRICULUM 
(Grades 9-12 Certification) 

REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (40 semester hours) Credits 

English and Communication Courses 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Communication Elective 3 

9 

Humanities and Social Sciences Courses' 

History Elective 3 

History or Philosophy of Science Elective 3 

Humanities Elective 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Science Electives 6 

18 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 9 

13 

Specialization (59-63 semester hours) 
Biology (39-61) 

Specialization Courses 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

BO 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

BO 365 Ecology Laboratory 1 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

GN 301 Genetics in Human Affairs or 

GN411 Principles of Genetics 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology or 

BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 4-3 

ZO 201 General Zoolog>' 4 

ZO 421 Principles of Physiology or 

ZO 414 Cell Biology or 

BO 421 Plant Physiology 3 

25-26 



Supporting Courses 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry or 

CH221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calculus A or 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 4 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calculus B or 

ST 31 1 Introduction to Statistics 3 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 3 

MEA 110 Geology I Laboratory 1 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

Earth Science Elective 3-4 

34-35 



Chemistry (61-62) 

Specialization Courses 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

CH 331 Intro. Physical Chemistry 4 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic chemistry or 
BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 3 

27 



Supporting Courses 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill ... 4 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 3 

MEA 110 Geology I Laboratory 1 

PY 205 Physics for Engrs. & Sci. I 4 

PY 208 Physics for Engrs. & Sci. II 4 

Biological Science Elective 3-4 

Earth Science Elective 3-4 

34-36 



153 



Earth Sciences (59-60) 

Sp<cializalion Coursex 

MEA 101 Geologj' I: Physical 3 

MEA 1 10 Geolog>' I Laboratory 1 

MEA 102 Geologc>' II; Historical 3 

MEA 1 1 1 GeolofO' II Laboratory 1 

MEA 130 Intro, to Weather & Climate or 

MEA 311 Physical Climatoloio' 3 

MEA 200 Introduction to Oceanography .. 3 

M EA 330 EnvironmenUl Geology 3 

MEA 331 Optical Mineralogy 4 

MEA 451 Structural Geology 4 

Earth Science Elective 3-4 

28-29 



Supporting Courxen 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A a7id 
MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B or 
MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I and 
MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II . . . 7-8 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

Biological Science Elective 3-4 

30-32 



Physics (61-63) 

Specializalion Coumes 

PY 201 University Physics I and 

PY 202 University Physics II or 

PY 205 Physics for Engrs. & Scientists I and 

PY 208 Physics for Engrs. & 

Scientists II 8 

PY 223 Astronomy 3 

PY 203 University Physics III or 

PY 407 Intro, to Modern Physics 3-4 

Physics Electives^ 10 

24-25 



Supporting Coursen 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill ... 4 
MA 341 Applied Differential Equations .. 3 

MEA 101 Geologj' I: Physical 3 

MEA 1 10 Geology I Laboratory 1 

Biological Science Elective 3-4 

Earth Science Elective 3-4 



37-39 



Professional Studies (29 semester hours) 

ECI 451 Improved Reading in Secondary Schools 2 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EMS 203S Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 

EMS 475 Methods of Teaching Science' 3 

EMS 476 Student Teaching in Science' 8 

EMS 477 Instructional Materials in Science 2 

EMS 495 Senior Seminar in Mathematics & Science Education 2 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130 

'The humanities and social science electives must be chosen from the university's official list of courses. Many courses in 
philosopy . religion. I iterature, fine arts, history, and foreign language are approved humanities courses. Many courses in 
economics, sociology, anthropology, political science, psychology, and geography are approved social science courses. 
Specified courses in other areas such as communication, education, design, and university studies also are approved as 
humanities or social sciences. Students are encouraged to select courses in this curriculum area so that each of these 
areas is represented; economics, governmental systems, social systems, and fine arts. 

-PY 411, 413, 414, and 452 are recommended. 

'These courses are taken together as a block and completed prior to student teaching. Student teaching is full-time for ten 
weeks in the fall semester. 



MIDDLE GRADES EDUCATION 

Assuciate Professor C. L. Harper, Coordinator 

The Middle Grades Education program seeks to prepare teachers who can effectively 
instruct young adolescents and be responsive to their unique needs, interests and abilities. 
Graduates may seek certification for teaching in grades 6-9 in two subject disciplines: 
language arts/social studies or mathematics/science. Students specializing in language 
arts/social studies are advised by the Department of Curriculum and Instruction. Students 
specializing in mathematics/science are enrolled in and advised by the Department of 
Mathematics and Science Education. Students who wish to become certified in only 



154 



mathematics or science teaching at the middle grades level must enroll in a special track in 
a mathematics education or science education degree program. 

LANGUAGE ARTS AND SOCIAL STUDIES EDUCATION- 
DUAL CONCENTRATION (6-9 Certification) 

REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (50 semester hours) Credits 

English and Communication Courses 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

Communication Elective 3 

9 

Natural Sciences Courses 

Two courses of laboratory science 8 

Mathematics Courses 

One mathematics course and an elective from mathematics, computer science or statistics. 

but excluding MA 101 and MA 111 6 

Humanities and Social Science Courses 

HI 205 Western Civilization Since 1400 or 

HI 233 The World in the 20th Century 3 

HI 251 Early American History or 

HI 252 Modern American History 3 

American Literature Electives 6 

Anthropology' or Sociology Elective 3 

Economics Elective 3 

Political Science Elective 3 

Physical Education Courses 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

PE 280 Emergency Medical Care and First Aid or 

PE 285 Personal Health 2 

Three one-credit PE electives 3 

6 
Free Electives (9 semester hours) 
Professional Education (39 semester hours) 

ECI 102 Orientation to Middle Grades Education 

ECI 205 Introduction to Teaching Humanities and Social Sciences 3 

ECI 306 Middle Years Reading 3 

ECI 309 Teaching in the Middle Years 3 

ECI 415 The Arts and Adolescence 3 

ECI 416 Teaching Exceptional Students in the Mainstreamed Classroom 3 

ECI 430 Methods & Materials for Teaching Language Arts in the Middle Grades 4 

ECI 435 Methods & Materials for Teaching Social Studies in the Middle Grades 4 

ECI 454 Student Teaching in English/Language Arts 4 

ECI 464 Student Teaching in Social Studies 4 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 476 Psychologj' of Adolescent Development 3 

lo 



► 



155 



TeachinK Concentrations (30 semester hours) 

Languag* Arts 

ECI 307 Teachinfr Writinir Across the Curriculum 3 

ECKENG) 405 Literature for Adolescents 3 

ENG 262 English Literature II 3 

ENG322 Advanced Composition and Rhetoric or 

ENG 324 Modern Entrlish 3 

Literature Elective 

Under General Studies and Professional Education 

ECI 306 Middle Years Reading 3 

American Literature courses 6 

Communication Elective 3 

Sor«a/ Studiex 

ECI 200 Principles of Teaching Geography 3 

H ! 275 I ntroduction to H istory of South and East Africa or 

HI 276 Introduction to History of West Africa 3 

HI 364 History of North Carolina 3 



EB Elective 
HI Elective 



Under General Studies 

HI 205 West. Civ. Since 1400 or 

HI 233 The World in the 20th Century 3 

HI 251 Early American History or 

HI 252 Modern American History 3 

Anthropology or Sociology Elective 3 

Political Science Elective 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 129 

Note: Students should consult the Department of Curriculum and Instruction for detailed information as to which 
courses will satisfy program requirements. 

MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE EDUCATION- 
DUAL CONCENTRATION (Grades 6-9 Certification) 

REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (43 semester hours) Credits 

Englixh and Communication Courses 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Communication Elective 3 

"9 

Humanities and Social Sciences Courses' 

History Elective 3 

Humanities Electives 6 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Science Electives 9 

21 

Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 9 

I3 

Teaching Major (46-48 semester hours) 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

CSC 101 Introduction to Programming or 

CSC 200 Introduction to Computers & Their Uses 3 

Life Science Elective 3-4 

MA 1 14 Introduction to Finite Mathematics & Applications 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A and 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B or 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I and 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 7-8 

156 



MA 225 Structure of the Real Number System or 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometry 3 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 3 

ME A 110 GeolofO' I Laboratory 1 

Statistics Elective or 

MA 105 Mathematics of Finance 3 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

Professional Studies (39 semester hours) 

ECI 306 Middle Years Reading 3 

ECI 309 Teaching in the Middle Years 3 

ECI 415 The Arts and Adolescence 2 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EMS 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 

EMS 470 Methods and Materials for Teaching Mathematics 3 

EMS 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics^ 1 

EMS 474 Teaching Mathematics Topics in the Middle Years^ 3 

EMS 475 Methods of Teaching Science- 3 

EMS 476 Student Teaching in Science- 4 

PE 280 Emergency Medical Care and First Aid or 

PE 285 Personal Health 2 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 128 

'The humanities and social science electives must be chosen from the university's official list of courses. Many courses in 
philosophy, religion, literature, fine arts, history, and foreign language are approved humanities courses. Many courses 
in economics, sociology, anthropology, political science, psycholog>', and geography are approved social science courses. 
Specified courses in other areas such as communication, education, design, and university studies also are approved as 
humanities or social sciences. Students are encouraged to select courses in this curriculum area so that each of these 
areas is represented: economics, governmental systems, social systems, and fine arts. 

-These courses are taken together as a block and completed prior to student teaching. Student teaching is full-time for ten 
weeks in the fall semester. 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION CURRICULUM 
(Grades 6-9 Certification) 

REQUIREMENTS 

General Studies (54 semester hours) Credits 

Engliiih and Comtiiunication Course.s 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Communication Elective 3 

9 

Humanities and Social Sciences Courses' 

History Elective 3 

Humanities Electives 6 

Literature Elective 3 

Social Science Electives 9 

21 

Science Courses 

Physical Science^ 4 

Natural Science Elective^ 4 



Physical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 12 

16 



157 



TeachinK Major (35 semester hours) 

CSC 101 Introduction to Profrramming 3 

CSC 102 Profn^amminsr Concepts 3 

MA 105 Mathematics of Finance 3 

MA 114 Introduction to Finite Mathematics with Applications 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Caic. I 4 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. 11 4 

MA 225 Structure of the Real Number System or 

MA 403 Introduction to Modern Algebra 3 

MA 408 Foundations of Euclidean Geometry 3 

MA 433 History of Mathematics 3 

PHI 201 Logic 3 

Statistics Elective 3 

35 

Professional Studies (39 semester hours) 

ECl 306 Middle Years Reading 3 

ECl 309 Teaching in the Middle Years 3 

ECl 415 The Arts and Adolescence 2 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EMS 101 Orientation to Mathematics and Science Education 

EMS 203 Introduction to Teaching Humanities and Social Science 3 

EMS 470 Methods & Materials for Teaching Mathematics 3 

EMS 471 Student Teaching in Mathematics' 8 

EMS 474 Teaching Mathematics Topics in the Middle Grades* 3 

EMS 480 Teaching Mathematics with Microcomputers 3 

PE 280 Emergency Medical Care and First Aid or 

PE 285 Personal Health 2 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 128 

'The humanities and social science electives must be chosen from the university's official list of courses. Many courses in 
philosophy, religion, literature, fine arts, history, and foreign language are approved humanities courses. Many courses 
in economics, sociology. anthropolog>'. political science, psychology, and geography are approved social science courses. 
Specified courses in other areas such as communication, education, design, and university studies also are approved as 
humanities or social sciences. Students are encouraged to select courses in this curriculum area so that each of these 
areas is represented: economics, governmental systems, social systems, and fine arts. j 

^Physical science must be a course in either chemistry or physics, with a laboratory. 

^May be a course in either the biological sciences or marine, earth and atmospheric sciences, with a laboratory. ' 

'These cou rses are taken together as a block and completed prior to student teaching. Student teaching is full-time for ten 
weeks during the fall semester. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION CURRICULUM 
(Grades 6-9 Certification) 

REQUIREMENTS 

(ieneral Studies (50 semester hours) Credits i 

Enatijih and Communication Course.s , 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 I 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

Communication Elective 3 

"9 

Humaniiiex and Social Sciencex Courses' 

Literature Elective 3 I 

History Elective 3 | 

Humanities Electives 9 

Social Science Electives 9 ' 

24 
MalhematicK Courses 

MA 121 Elementsof Calculus or I 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry and Calculus A 4 i 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry and Calculus B or 

ST 31 1 Introduction to Statistics 4-3 

7-8 



158 



Physicitl Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 9 

I3 
Teaching Major (37 semester hours) 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 3 

MEA 110 Geology I Laboratory 1 

ZO 201 General Zoology 4 

Earth Science Elective 3 

Physics Electives 6-8 

Science Elective 3 

Professional Studies (38 semester hours) 

ECI 306 Middle Years Reading 3 

ECI 309 Teaching in the Middle Years 3 

ECI 415 The Arts and Adolescence 2 

ELP 344 School and Society 3 

EMS 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics and Science 3 

EMS 475 Methods of Teaching Science^ 3 

EMS 476 Student Teaching in Science- 8 

EMS 477 Instructional Materials in Science^ 2 

EMS 495 Senior Seminar in Mathematics and Science Education 3 

PE 280 Emergencv Medical Care and First Aid or 

PE 285 Personal Health 2 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 476 Psychology of Adolescent Development 3 

Minimum Hours for graduation 128 

'The humanities and social science electives must be chosen from the university's official list of courses. Many courses in 
philosophy, religion, literature, fine arts, history, and foreign language are approved humanities courses. Many courses 
in economics, sociology, anthropology, political science, psychology, and geography are approved social science courses. 
Specified courses in other areas such as communication, education, design, and university studies also are approved as 
humanities or social sciences. Students are encouraged to select courses in this curriculum area so that each of these 
areas is represented: economics, governmental systems, social systems, and fine arts. 

^These courses are taken together as a block and completed prior to student teaching. Student teaching is full-time for ten 
weeks during the fall semester only. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Poe Hall (Room 640) 

Professor P. W. Thayer, Head of the Department and Coordinator of Advising 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: K. W. Klein, D. H. Mershon 

Professors: J. W. Cunningham, D. W. Drewes, T. E. LeVere, S. E. Newman. B. W. Westbrook; Adjunct Professor: J. L. 
Howard: Professors Emeriti: K. L. Barkley. H. M. Corter. J. C. Johnson. H. G. Miller: ^.s.sofiafe Professors:]. L. Cole. W. 
P. Erchul. D. 0. Gray. T. M. Hess. P. F. Horan. J. W. Kalat, K. W. Klein. J. E. R. Luginbuhl. D. H. Mershon, S. B. Pond. 
F. .]. Smith. S. S. Snyder. N. W. Walker: Adjunct Associate Professors: B. F. Corder. J. Lawrence: Associate Professors 
Emeriti: M. L. Pitts, R. F. Rawls: Assistant Professors: L. E. Baker-Ward. R. W. Barnes-Nacoste. C. C. Brookins. S. A. 
Converse. M. E. Haskett: Adjunct Assistant Professors: M. Y. Bingham. B. Braddy. A. D. Hall. C. L. Kronberg; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: C. D. Korte(Multidisciplinary Studies). R.G. Pearson (Industrial Engineering). J. L. 
Wasik (Statistics). 

Psychology is one of the basic university disciplines. Mastery of some of the knowledge in 
psychology is necessary to practitioners in education, health, social service, social sciences 
and managerial professions. Students holding the bachelor's degree in psychology and 
wishing to apply their psychological studies in a professional capacity generally continue 
their education in a graduate program such as applied or experimental psychology, or in 

159 



such fields as law, medicine, business, social work and a variety of other fields. Students in 
psycholog>' may also choose to enter business or government, often without further training 
beyond the bachelor's degree. There are currently two different programs for undergradu- 
ate majors in psychology: the General Option (PSY), and the Human Resource Develop- 
ment Option (HRD). Each program emphasizes different aspects of the study of psychol- 
og>'. The following sections provide separate descriptions of these programs and their 
current requirements. 

Within each of the options, there are honors tracks which provide special curricula and an 
opportunity for work with faculty on research projects. Students must have completed a 
minimum of 45 semester hours of course work (at least 15 at NCSU) and have a grade point 
average of 3.25 or better to be considered for admission to an honors program. More details 
as to admission and requirements are available from the Psychology Department. 

All undergraduate majors are members of the Psychology Club, which provides a 
number of enrichment activities, including sponsorship of the Carolinas Psychology Con- 
ference. One of the largest undergraduate conferences in the United States, it is held 
annually in cooperation with Meredith College and other Cooperating Raleigh Colleges. 
There is also an active chapter of Psi Chi, the national psychology honor society, which 
provides enrichment to the program. 

PSYCHOLOGY: GENERAL OPTION 

The General Option is oriented toward the student who wants a broad understanding of 
the types of problems with which psychology is concerned and the ways in which psycholo- 
gists approach and attempt to solve these problems. Curriculum requirements in the 
General Option are sufficiently flexible for students to concentrate, if they wish, in another 
area of study as well as psychology, and thereby prepare themselves for a variety of careers 
or professional graduate programs. By wise choice of elective courses, a student can 
prepare for medical, legal, business, or education graduate training, while at the same time 
acquiring a basic background in the social sciences. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major Field of Study: Credits 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology 3 

PSY (ST) 240 Intro. Research Methods I 3 

PSY (ST) 241 Intro. Research Methods I Lab 1 

PSY (ST) 242 Intro. Research Methods II 3 

PSY (ST) 243 Intro. Research Methods II Ub 2 

Two courses from Group 1: 6 

PSY 300 Perception 

PSY 310 Learning and Motivation 

PSY 320 Cognitive Processes 

PSY 330 Biological Psychology 

PSY 505 History and Systems of Psychology 
Three courses (one each from three different sets in Group 2): 9 

PSY .TO7 or 340 Industrial Psychology or Ergonomics 

PSY 376. 475 or 476 Developmental Psychology 

PSY 370 or 470 Personality and Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 411 or 412 Social or Applied Psychology 

PSY 435 Introduction to Psychological Measurement 
PSY Electives 6 

33 

Enfilixh Coumes: 

ENG 111, 112 English Composition 6 

ENG 331. 332. or 33.3. or COM (SP) 110, 112, 201. or 202 3 

~9 

MathematicH CourxeH: 

Two mathematics courses (not MA 101. 103, 109 or 1 1 1) 6-7 

One computer science course 2-3 

8-10 



160 



Humanities and Social Science Courses: 

Two literature courses 6 

Three history or social science courses 9 

PHI 201, 311. 332. 335. 340 or 341 3 

One other philosophy course 3 

21 

Natural Science Courses: 

BS 100 or 105 4 

Two natural science courses (at least one with lab) 6-7 



10-11 



Restricted Electives: 

Five courses in an approved grouping related to student's future plans 15 

Free Electives: 

To meet minimum total hours required for graduation 21-24 

Physical Education: 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Three courses 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 124 

Students should consult the Psychology Department for detailed information as to which courses will satisfy mathe- 
matics, natural science, literature and social science requirements. 

Required PSY-Group 1: two courses from PSY 300. 310. 320, 330 
Required PSY — Group 2: one course from any three sets 

PSY 307 or 340 

PSY 376. 475 or 476 

PSY 370 or 470 

PSY 411 or 412 

PSY 436 

MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

The Departments of Psychology and of Philosophy and Religion offer an interdiscipli- 
nary minor in cognitive science. The minor provides a general introduction to contempor- 
ary interdisciplinary research within the framework of the "computer model" mind, and 
offers the student the opportunity for in-depth study of selected topics such as the nature of 
human information processing, the acquisition and use of language, and machine 
intelligence. 

To complete the minor, 15 hours are required, distributed as follows: PSY 320 (Cognitive 
Processes); PSY 340 (Environmental Ergonomics) or PSY 545 (Human Information Pro- 
cessing); PHI 331 (Philosophy of Language); PHI 332 (Philosophy of Psychology); PHI/PSY 
425/525 (Introduction to Cognitive Science). 

MINOR IN PSYCHOLOGY 

The Psychology Department offers a minor in psychology to majors in any field except 
psychology. To complete the minor, eighteen hours of courses are required, six of these 
hours in the basic science of psychology, and nine in the applied aspects of psychology. PSY 
200 is a required prerequisite. All must be passed with a grade of "C" or better. 

PSYCHOLOGY: HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT OPTION 

The Human Resource Development (HRD) Option is designed to provide a groundwork of 
skills and experience for students who wish to enter human service careers with a B.A. 
degree. With appropriate curriculum modifications, the program can also provide a sound 
background for students who wish to go into advanced degree programs in psychology, 
management, personnel, social work, counselling, guidance, education, and other areas. 
Students interested in graduate school should confer with their advisors in order to plan an 
appropriate course of study. 

The HRD Option focuses on enabling students to gain direct experience in the areas in 
which they would like to work. HRD students devote a semester to learning principles and 
skills related to working with human problems, and subsequently each HRD student 



161 



spends a semester working part-time or full-time in a job related to his/her own area of 
interest. The H RD Option accepts a maximum of 20 students each year. Interested students 
can apply for admission to HRD during their sophomore or junior year. Further informa- 
tion and application forms are available in the Psychology Department office. 

REQUIREMENTS 

M,ij^„ FuUiuf Study: 

PSY 200 Introduction to Psyeholoffy 3 

PSY (ST» 240 Intro Research Methods I 3 

PSY(ST»241 Intro Research Methods I Lab 1 

PSY (STI 242 Intro Research Methods II 3 

PSY (STi 24.S Intro Research Methods II Lab 2 

PSY 210 Applied Psychology or 

PSY 412 Applied Psychological Research 3 

PSY :ibO HRD Skills 3 

PSY 495 HRD Practicum 6-11 

PSY 499 Individual Study in Psychology 4 

PSY Electives ■■■ 9 

37-42 

Englinh Coumex: 

ENG 111. 112 English Composition 6 

Two courses from ENG 331, COM (SP) 110. 112. 201 or 202 6 

12 

Stathrmaticx Coumex: 

Two mathematics courses (not MA 101. 103, 109, or 111) 6-7 

One computer science 2-3 

8-10 

Humanities and Social Science Courses: 

Two literature courses 6 

Three history or social science courses 9 

PHI 201. 311, :«5, 340 or 341 3 

One other philosophy course 3 

21 

Natural Science Courses: 

BS 100 or 105 4 

Two natural science courses (at least one with lab) 6-7 

10-11 

Restricted Electii-es: 

Three courses in an approved grouping related to student's future plans 9 

Free Electii'ex: As needed to meet minimum hours required for graduation 15-21 

Physical Education: 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Three courses 3 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 124 

Students should consult the Psychology Department for detailed information as to which courses will satisfy mathe- 
matics, natural science, literature, and social science requirements. 

CURRICULUM DISPLAY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

EaltSemesUr Creditx Spriiifi Semester Creditx 

BS 100 or 105 General Biology 4 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

ENG 111 Comp.>sition & Rhetoric 3 History or Social Science 3 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 Natural Science 3-4 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 3 I'hilo.sophy 3 

Mathematics 4 Free Elective 3 



15 



Physical Education Elective 1 

16-17 



162 



I 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PSV 240 Intro. Behavioral Research I 3 

PSY241 Intro. Behavioral Res. I Lab I 

History or Social Science .'•! 

Literature 3 

Mathematics 3-4 

Ph.vsical Education Elective 1 

14-15 



Siiring Se7tiester Credits 

PSY 242 Intro. Behavioral Research II 3 

PSY 243 Intro. Behavioral Res. II Lab 2 

Computer Science 2-3 

History or Social Science 3 

Natural Science 3-4 

Philosophy 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17-19 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PSY 210 or 412 3 

PSY 350 3 

PSY 495 3 

COM (SP) 112 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

Is 



SENIOR YEAR 



Foil Semester 



Credits 



Literature 3 

PSY Elective 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 

15 



Sprinq Semester Credits 

PSY 495 3-8 

PSY 499 4 

PSY Elective 3 

Free Elective 3-6 

16-18 



Spring Semester Credits 

PSY Elective 3 

Restricted Elective 3 

Communication or Technical Writing 3 

Free Electives 3-6 

12-15 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 124 



I 

SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHER EDUCATION 

Associate Professor C. W. Harper, Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become secondary social studies teachers in grades 9-12 will be 
enrolled in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. Curriculum requirements for 
the teacher education options can be found under history, political science and public 
administration, and sociology and anthropology in that college's section. Students desiring 
to become social studies teachers in grades 6-9 will be enrolled in the College of Education 
and Psychology. 



SPANISH TEACHER EDUCATION 

Assistant Professor L. Salstad, Coordinator of Advising 

Students desiring to become teachers of Spanish will be enrolled in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences. The curriculum requirements for the teacher education 
option in Spanish can be found under Foreign Languages and Literatures in that college's 
section. 



163 



TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

Poe Hall (Room ;iUO) 

Associate Profensor R. E. Peterson. Coordinator of Advising 

ProfttaoT Emrrxlun D. W, Olson: A.<mciate Profexsor: R. E. Wenip Asxociate Pro/exsors Emeriti: W. L. Cox. Jr.. T. B. 
Younir. A**t*tant Profrnon: W. W. DeLuca. W. J. Haynie. Ill: Assistant Professor Emeritus: R. T. Troxler. 

Technolopr>' arts education is a study of the materials, processes, and product of technol- 
otO' and industry. Students learn the safe and efficient use of tools, machines, and the 
characteristics of materials in various technolo^' education laboratories. Products are 
desifrned and constructed, and systems of efficiently organizing and managing work are 
studied. Practical skills, and an understandingof the contributions and impacts of technol- 
ojo' in society, are developed. The technology education curriculum provides a general 
technical background for a variety of employment opportunities including certification as a 
teacher for industrial arts and technology education programs in middle and high schools. 
A minor in technolog>' education is available. 

REQUIREMENTS 

Major Field of Study Credits 

GC 120 Foundations of Graphics 3 

GC 200 Applied Computer Aided Drawing 3 

TED 1 15 Wood Processing 3 

TED 122 MeUl Technology 3 

TED 221 Construction Technology 3 

TED 246 Graphic Arts Technolog>' 3 

TED .•<.S9 Electrical Technology I 3 

TED :«0 Electrical Technology- II 3 

TED 'iHA Computer Applications in Industry 3 

TED 4.'W Manufacturing Technology 3 

TED 476 Transportation: Energy and Power Technology 3 

"33 

Profejutional Education 

ELP .^14 School and Society 3 

ECI 4.51 Improving Reading in Secondary Schools 2 

EOE 101 Introduction to Occupational Education 1 

EOE 207 Introduction to Teaching Occup. Educ 3 

EOE 452 Lab Planning in Technology Education 3 

EOE 4.56 Curriculum and Methods in Technology Educ 3 

EOE 457 Student Teaching in Technology Education 

EOE 495 Senior Seminar in Technology Education 3 

"26 

Academic Concentration 24 

(Select courses from approved list) 

Option 1 — Economics 

Option 2— Science/Technology/Society-Sociology 

Option 3— Science/Technology/Society-Economics 

Engtink Counten 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

E.S'(; 1 12 ('<>mpo6ition and Reading 3 

1 
Miitkrmalu:.- CoumtK 

MA Elective (not 101 or 111) 3 

MA (not 101 or 111). Logic, or Statistics !.!!!.!!!!.!.!!!.!!!!!.!!!. 3 

6 



164 



Humanities and Social Sciences 

PSY 304 Educational Psychology 3 

PSY 376 Developmental Psychology or 

PSY 476 Psycholog>' of Adolescent Development 3 

HI 341 Technolog>' in History 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Communication Elective 3 

15 

Natural Scif^ces 

CH HI Foundations of Chemistry 4 

Physics Elective 4 

8 

Phjisical Education and Free Electives 

PE 100 Health and Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education Electives 3 

Free Electives 9 

13 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 131 

MINOR IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION 

The Technology Education minor provides students a blend of cognitive and psychomotor 
experiences that enhance the understanding of technology and allow development of fun- 
damental skills in selected technical areas. Each student will select courses with the aid of 
an advisor from the Technology Education faculty. The minor requires a Graphic Com- 
munications course, fundamentals courses, and applications courses. The minor options 
allow students to pursue professional interests within an area of technology. 




COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Page Hall (Rooms 118 and 120) 

J. K. Ferrell, Interim Dean 

T. H. Glisson. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

B. Houck. Director of Engineering Special Programs 

W. E. Isler. Assistant Dean for Research Programs 

R. M. Turner, Assistant Dean for Student Services 

H. Winston, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs 

Young men and women who seek a challenging technical career in research and devel- 
opment, design, construction, production, maintenance, technical sales, management, 
teaching, or other careers requiring a methodical, creative solution of problems, should 
consider an engineering or computer science education. At NCSU, the College of Engineer- 
ing has a distinguished and internationally recognized faculty. The faculty, together with 
the curricula of the undergraduate and graduate programs, offer an opportunity for 
ambitious young men and women to become the leaders and prime movers of our increas- 
ingly technological world. Because of the great influence of science and technology on our 
everyday lives, today's engineer and computer scientist must be acutely aware of, and 
responsible for, the impact that his or her creations may have on society. In addition to 
safety, aesthetics, economics, and energy, today's technologist must consider environmen- 
tal, sociological, and other "human concern" costs. 

The college's 28,000 graduates may be found in widely diversified careers throughout the 
world. Most are practicing in the engineering profession, but because their education has 
equipped them well to deal with problems in a wide variety of fields, many College of 
Engineering graduates have become corporate presidents, leaders in government, lawyers, 
and medical doctors, to name a few. 

The College of Engineering is organized into ten departments: Biological and Agricul- 
tural, Chemical, Civil, Electrical and Computer, Industrial, Materials Science and Engi- 
neering, Mechanical and Aerospace, Nuclear, and Textile Engineering and Science; and 
the Department of Computer Science. Fifteen undergraduate degree programs are offered 
in these ten departments. In addition, a degree program in Engineering is offered by 
special arrangement to the very few students who can clearly demonstrate the need for an 
individualized program of study. Most departments offer advanced studies leading to 
professional degrees, master's degrees and the Doctor of Philosophy degree. (See listing of 
graduate degrees offered.) 

The College of Engineering requests and receives accreditation from the Accrediting 
Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) for twelve of its undergraduate engineer- 
ing degree programs. Accreditation insures that these programs satisfy the minimum 
requirements for acceptance by this nationally recognized agency for accrediting engineer- 
ing degree programs. The program in computer science is accredited by The Computer 
Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC) of the Computing Sciences Accreditation 
Board (CSAB). All curricula and programs are designed to maintain the college's national 
and international reputation while meeting the needs of the people and industries of the 
state and region through effective instruction, competent research, and the development of 
new and meaningful contributions to scientific knowledge. 

A Career Planning and Placement Center is maintained by the university to assist 
continuing students and graduating students to achieve their career goals. 

UNDERGRADUATE CURRICULA AND DEGREES 

Incoming engineering and computer science freshmen are enrolled in a basic program, 
Engineering Undesignated, for a period of one to two years. After successfully completing 
the Engineering Undesignated requirements, a student enters a specific degree program. 

166 



f 



The first-year curriculum is common to all undergraduate degree programs in the college. 
Entering students receive assistance in planning an appropriate program of study and 
have available continued guidance from an academic adviser throughout their academic 
careers. 

In order to be eligible to apply for admission into a degree program. Engineering 
Undesignated students must successfully complete at least 28 credit hours of courses, 
including the following: MA 141 and MA 241; PY 205; ENG 111; CH 101, and one of either 
CH 105/107 or CSC 110/112. 

Bachelor of Science— The baccalaureate program provides preparation for entry into 
industry, government, business or private practice as well as graduate school. Graduates 
with a BS degree in engineering or computer science may be engaged in design, develop- 
ment, production/construction, sales, maintenance, or the planning, operation, or man- 
agement of industrial units. 

The undergraduate curricula offer programs of study leading to a bachelor's degree in 
aerospace engineering, biological and agricultural engineering, chemical engineering, 
civil engineering, civil engineering construction option, construction management, compu- 
ter engineering, computer science, electrical engineering, engineering, furniture manu- 
facturing and management, industrial engineering, materials science and engineering, 
mechanical engineering, nuclear engineering, and textile engineering. Graduation re- 
quirements include the satisfactory completion of the specified number of credit hours of 
required courses and electives in any one of the sixteen curricula. Students must also earn 
an overall grade point average of 2.0, and a grade point average of 2.0 in their major 
courses. The total number of required credits ranges from 129 to 137 semester hours. 

Double Degree Programs — NCSU students may wish to earn a bachelor of science 
degree in two fields of engineering or in computer science and an engineering field. When the 
two courses of study are planned sufficiently early to optimize the student's time, it is often 
found that courses required in one field may be substituted for required courses in the 
second field. The humanities/social science, physics, mathematics, chemistry, English and 
physical education sequences are common to many fields. In addition, required courses in 
one field can be used as free electives in other fields. This type of double degree program can 
usually be completed in five years. Students interested in such a program should consult the 
Assistant Dean for Student Services, and the department heads of the two courses of study. 

Other students may wish to combine a bachelor of science in engineering or computer 
science with a bachelor of science or bachelor of arts degree in some other college at North 
Carolina State University. As in the double engineering degree program, it is often found 
that courses required in one college may be substituted for courses required in a second 
college. When two academic programs are planned sufficiently early to optimize the 
student's time, this type of double degree program can usually be completed in five years. 
Students interested in such a program should contact either their Coordinator of Advising 
or the Assistant Dean for Student Services, and the Associate Dean for Undergraduate 
Programs in the college offering the second degree. 

A limited number of freshmen students in the College of Engineering are selected to 
participate in the Benjamin Franklin Scholars program. In addition to their major courses, 
each Benjamin Franklin Scholar develops an individualized, five-year plan of work focused 
on a central theme in the humanities and social sciences. Students completing the program 
receive a Bachelor of Science in engineering or computer science and a Bachelor of Arts in 
Multidisciplinary Studies. 

TRANSFER PROGRAM 

Students with non-engineering degrees or one or more years of academic work completed 
at other institutions may apply for transfer admission to the College of Engineering 
through the University Admissions Office. Students are admitted from appropriate pro- 
grams from four-year institutions, as well as junior and community colleges. 

Students currently attending or anticipating attendance at other institutions are advised 
to contact the Assistant Dean for Student Services for information relative to transfer GPA 
required, transferable credits, etc. 



167 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES IN ENGINEERING 

The College of Engineering offers post-baccalaureate curricula leading to the degrees of 
Chemical Engineer. Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer. Industrial Engineer, Materials 
Engineer, Mechanical Engineer, and Nuclear Engineer. These programs of study are 
designed to fit the needs of students desiring intensive specialization in a particular field, or 
additional work not ordinarily covered in the normal undergraduate curricula. For further 
details, see "PROFESSIONAL DEGREES." 

PURCHASE OF COMPUTERS BY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING STUDENTS 

Prior to the 1990 fall semester, the College of Engineering will install the first phase of a 
student computing facility composed of stand alone engineering workstations. During their 
first semester, new freshmen in the college will enroll in a computer literary course, E 115, ] 
which will be taught using the workstations. Following their completion of E 115, it is 
expected that students will incorporate use of the workstations into all curricular areas, j 
including the preparation of reports and papers in non-technical subjects. 

In either the freshman or sophomore year, most students will take a course in computer ' 
programming and, thereafter, will increasingly use computers as an engineering tool. The 
college policy is that all of its students will be provided with the computer resources, time 
and equipment, which are required to successfully complete their course of study. 

However, some students may find that owning a computer is beneficial in terms of 
convenience and ready access to computational capability. Since different departments 
within the college have different course and computer language requirements, the college 
recommends that new students who decide to purchase a personal computer should not do 
so until they have been admitted into a degree program. 

INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES 

The college is actively working to provide its students with opportunities for overseas 
work and study experience. In addition to the study abroad program which is available to 
all students at NCSU, College of Engineering students can participate in an exchange 
program with the Universite de Technologic de Compiegne in Compiegne, France, or they 
can participate in the International Student program at Kingston Polytechnic in the 
Greater London area. Students interested in Japan can participate in one of several pro- 
grams offered by EAGLE, the Engineering Alliance for Global Education. 

HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Each student in the College of Engineering is required to take a minimum of 18 credit 
hours of humanities and social science courses. All of the courses used to satisfy the 
humanities and social science requirement must be taken from the College of Engineering 
list of approved courses. The courses will be distributed as designated below: 

1. A beginning economics course, EB 201 or EB 212. 

2. A course in the history of science or the philosophy of science. Suitable courses are 
shown on the following list. 

HI 321 Ancient and Medieval Science 

HI 322 Rise of Modern Science 

HI 341 Technology in History 

HI 480 History of the Scientific Revolution 

HI 481 Historvof the Life Sciences 

MDS (UNI) 301 Science and Civilization 

MDS(UNI) 302 Contemporary Science and Human Values 

PHI 340 Philosophy of Science 

3. Two courses, at least one of which must be an advanced course, from one of the 
following humanities groups. 

Communication (COM(SP)) 

English Language Literature (ENG) 

Foreign Language Literature (FL_ GRK. LAT) 

168 



History (HI) 
Philosophy (PHI) 
Religion (REL) 
4. Two courses, at least one of which must be an advanced course, from one of the 
following social science groups. 
Anthropology (ANT) 
Economics (EB) 
Political Science (PS) 
Psychology (PSY) 
Sociology (SOC) 

Note: The beginning economics course specified in (1) may be used with an advanced 
economics course to satisfy the social science requirement (4) above. If so, an additional 
course must be completed and any course from the College of Engineering list of 
approved humanities and social science courses may be used for this purpose. Students 
may obtain a copy of the list from their Coordinator of Advising. 

ENGINEERING SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

The Engineering Scholars Program has as its goal the promotion of research and 
academic careers in engineering and computer science. Under the sponsorship of the 
College of Engineering, in cooperation with the Division of Student Affairs, Scholars begin 
by living together and participating in special educational seminars, cultural enrichment 
activities, and scholars sections for some coursework. In the sophomore year. Engineering 
Scholars begin research apprenticeships with faculty members throughout the College of 
Engineering. Additional information may be obtained by contacting departmental pro- 
gram representatives. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

This optional program is structured so that the student will alternate semesters of study 
with semesters of practical work during the sophomore and junior academic levels. The 
freshman and senior years are spent on campus, while the sophomore and junior academic 
levels are spread over a three-year period to permit the alternating of the academic 
semesters with work experience semesters. Students earn a salary while they are in 
industry, and they may earn a sufficient income to finance much of their college education. 
The co-op plan normally takes five years for completion during which time the student 
receives 12 to 18 months of industrial experience in their career field. 

Students in all curricula in the College of Engineering may apply if they have a grade- 
point average of 2.25 or better. After a student has been accepted for employment, he or she 
is expected to maintain at least a 2.0 grade-point average. Application for admission into 
the co-op program should be made early in the spring semester of the freshman year; 
however, later applications resulting in fewer work semesters prior to graduation will be 
considered during the sophomore year or the first semester of the junior year. Engineering 
Undesignated students must be admitted into an engineering degree program prior to 
beginning the first co-op assignment. Further information may be obtained from the Office 
of Cooperative Education, 213 Peele Hall. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Each curriculum in the College of Engineering has a technical society open to every 
student enrolled in the curriculum. In most cases, these are student chapters of national 
professional organizations. Each curriculum also has one or more honor societies to give 
recognition to students who have earned superior academic records. In addition, there are 
college-wide honor, professional, and service societies that offer personally and education- 
ally rewarding opportunities for students. 

Student representatives of each curriculum serve on the Engineers' Council. The Council 
is the coordinating agency for college-wide activities such as the Engineer-in-Training 
(EIT) examination review classes, the Engineers' Week Exhibition, the annual St. 
Patrick's Day Dance, and the "Southern Engineer" student publication. 

169 



BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 

David S. Weaver Laboratories (Room 100) 

Professor R. S. Sowell. Interim Head of the Department and Graduate Administrator 

Professor G. B. Blum. Jr., Coordinator of Advising 

(For a list of faculty, see Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 

Biolojfical and agricultural engineering students are trained to deal with problems of 
agriculture that are engineering in nature. Scientific and engineering principles are 
applied to the conservation and utilization of water and soil, the development of power and 
labor-saving devices for all phases of agricultural production, the design of structures and 
equipment for housing and handling livestock and field products, and the processing and 
marketing of agricultural products. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of the Engineering curriculum qualify for positions in design, development 
and research in public institutions and in industry. This curriculum, accredited by the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, also provides adequate training for 
post-graduate work leading to advanced degrees. (See listing of graduate degrees offered). 

CURRICULUM IN BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

The engineering curriculum provides an educational program for students which uni- 
quely prepares them for dealing with engineering problems in the biological and agricul- 
tural areas. Program emphasis is on the agricultural area while flexibility in the program 
allows the student to attain depth in special sub-areas or in biological engineering. Empha- 
sis is placed on basic science and engineering courses such as mathematics, physics, 
mechanics, biology, soils, and thermodynamics which provide a sound background for the 
application of engineering to agricultural and biological problems. 

Since biological and agricultural engineering involves two distinct technical fields- 
agriculture and engineering— the curriculum is jointly administered by The College of 
Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Engineering. Undergraduate freshmen 
entering this curriculum should enroll in the College of Engineering undesignated pro- 
gram and indicate SBU as their curriculum choice. After successfully completing the 
Engineering undesignated requirements the student will enter the Biological and Agricul- 
tural Engineering Department. Graduates receive a B.S. in Biological and Agricultural 
Engineering. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Srmexter Credits Spring Semester CrediUs 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Chem. Principles & Appl 4 

E 100 Introduction to COE ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

E 1 \h Intro, to Computinpr Envir 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient 4 

MA 141 Ani\lytic (ieometry & Cale. I 4 Physical Education Elective 1 

PE 1(K) Health & Physical Fitness 1 — 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 



170 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 151 Elements of BAE I 2 BAE 252 Elements of BAE II 4 

BS 100 General Biolog>' 4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Eqns. I 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. IH 4 MAE 208 Engineering Dynamics 3 

MAE 206 Engineering Statics 3 MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 SSC 200 Soil Science or 

Physical Education Elective 1 CH 220 Organic Chemistry 4 

"TX Physical Education Elective 1 

li 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credit's Spring Semester Credits 

BAE 471 Soil & Water Engineering 4 BAE 342 Agricultural Processing 4 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics 2 BAE 361 Analytical Methods 3 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 3 ECE 211 Electric Circuits I 3 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics I 3 ECE 213 Electric Circuits Lab I 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 ENG 331 Comm. for Engr. & Tech 3 

Free Elective 3 History or Philosophy of Science 3 

18 1? 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semfster Credits Spring Seynester Credits 

BAE 391 ElectroTechnology in BAE 3 BAE 452 Agri. Engineering Design II 2 

BAE 451 Agri. Engineering Design I 4 BAE 462 Funct. Dsgn. Field Machines 3 

BAE 481 Agri. Struct. & Environ 4 Engineering Science Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 Advanced Humanities Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 Advanced Social Science Elective 3 

~p: Free Elective 3 

17 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 137 

NOTE: Students in the Engineering Program in Biological and Agricultural Engineering are officially enrolled in a 
curriculum jointly administered by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Engineering. 
Duplicate academic records are kept in both college offices. All graduates receive the accredited engineering degree, as 
BS in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. The humanities and social sciences electives listed above must be selected 
as outlined for the College of Engineering in the Undergraduate Catalog and as listed on the college's approved list. Before 
any engineering student is eligible to enroll in a 200 and higher level engineering course that is a required course in the 
student's engineering curricula, the student must have earned a "C" or better in Chemistry 101. English 1 1 1, Mathematics 
141 and 241, and Physics 205. This requirement applies to all students enrolled in the jointly administered SBE 
curriculum. Accredited by Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET). 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories (Room 113) 

Professor G. W. Roberts, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor C. J. Setzer, Associate Head of the Department 

Professor C. K. Hall, Graduate Administrator 

Professor D. B. Marsland, Coordinator of Advising 

Distinguished University Professor: D. F. Ollis 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: R. M. Felder 

Alcoa Professor: J. K. Ferrell 

Camille Dreyfus Professor: H. B. Hopfenberg 

Hoechst-Celanese Professors: R. G. Carbonell, R. M. Felder 



171 



Pro/l-Moni K G Bachmann R.G.Carbonell. P.S. Fedkiw. R. M. Felder.J. K. Ferrell.C. K. Hall, H. B. Hopfenberg, D.C. 
Martin D F OIlis M R Overcash. G. W. Roberts. E. P. Stahel; Adjunct Profesnors: W. J. Koros, D. R. Squire. A. H. 
Wehe ProfeMor* Fmeriti K. 0. Beatty. D. B. Marsland. A. S. Michaels. J. F. Seely. V. T. Stannett: Associate Professors: 
C M Balik P K Kilpatrick P K Lim, C. J. Setzer. S. Torquato. H. Winston; Adjunct Associoie Professors: D. A. 
Denny. J. L Williams: As-^iMant Professors: R. T. Chern. B. D. Freeman. C. S. Grant. H. H. Lamb. S. W. Peretti. 

The sound management of material and energy resources, taking into account natural, 
economic, and environmental constraints, guides the performance of chemical engineering 
practice. Chemical engineering education integrates design and analysis, science and 
technology, with communication skills developed through exposure to the humanities and 
the social and economic sciences. Chemical engineering organizes these diverse skills into a 
coherent discipline uniquely suited to the needs of the chemical, biochemical, petroleum, 
plastics, textile, and pulp and paper industries. 

FACILITIES 

Departmental teaching and research activities are based on the four floors comprising 
the east wing of the Riddick Engineering Laboratories. Equipment for studying the 
principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, distillation, absorption, drying, crystallization, and 
filtration is maintained in several laboratories. Chemical reaction kinetics including the 
kinetics of radiation-induced polymerization reactions are studied on specially designed 
equipment. Extensive apparatus is available for characterizing the relationships between 
molecular structure and bulk properties of polymers. 

A 2.000 square foot biotechnology laboratory has been equipped to include a pilot plant 
for studying biologically mediated chemical reactions. Specialized digital computational 
equipment complements campus-wide university computer resources. The department 
makes constant use of its fully expanded MicroVax-3600 computer system which is accessi- 
ble for use 24 hours a day by students and faculty. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Competition for chemical engineering graduates at all degree levels is intense. Graduates 
readily find employment at extremely attractive salaries in diverse subdisciplines includ- 
ing research and development, production, management and administration; process con- 
trol, technical service, and sales; estimation and specification writing; consulting and 
teaching. Students desiring careers in teaching or consulting are advised to consider 
graduate training (see listing of graduate degree offered). Chemical engineering graduates 
often pursue careers in law or the medical sciences since the broadly structured under- 
graduate curriculum provides strong preparation for graduate study in a wide range of 
professional specialties. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

The successful practice of chemical engineering requires a broad, diversified prepara- 
tion. The spirit of research and experimental inquiry is vital; students, therefore, require 
.sound scientific backgrounds essential to original and disciplined thought, enthusiastic 
inquiry and. ultimately, original and constructive accomplishment. The undergraduate 
curriculum emphasizes the scientific, engineering, and economic principles involved in the 
design and operation of chemical processes. The background in organic, physical, and 
inorganic chemistry is comparable to the training offered to chemistry majors. Mathe- 
matics, physical sciences, and distributed humanities courses are also required. The chem- 
ical engineering program, which is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering. 



172 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

E 100 Introduction to COE 

E 115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 Chem. Principles & Appl 4 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles 4 

CSC 112 Intro, to Computing— FORTRAN 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 4 



Physical Education Elective 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 3 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 4 

MA 341 Appl. Differential Eq. I 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

li 



Fall Semtster 
CHE 311 
CHE 315 
ECE 331 
MAT 201 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Credits 



Transport Processes I 3 

Chemical Process Thermodynamics 3 

Princ. of Electrical Engr. I 3 

Struct. & Prop, of Engr. Mat'ls 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH437 Physical Chemistry for Engr 4 

CHE 312 Transport Processes II 3 

CHE 316 Thermo. Chem. & Phase Eq 3 

CHE 330 Chemical Engr. Lab I 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

le 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



CHE 331 Chemical Engr. Lab II 3 

CHE 446 Design & Aniy. Chem. Reactors 3 

CHE 450 Chemical Engineering Design I 3 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chem. Engr 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

CHE 425 Proc. Syst. AnIy. & Control 3 

CHE 451 Chem. Engr. Design II 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 132 

'CHE 497 Chemical Engr. Projects strongly recommended as one of the Technical Electives. 

^Humanities and Social Sciences requirement courses must be selected from the approved College of Engineering list. 

BIOSCIENCES OPTION IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

By enhanced exposure to the biological sciences, the biosciences option in chemical 
engineering enables the student to develop insight into biological systems and processes. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

See the freshman year for the curriculum in chemical engineering. Students in the biosciences option should take EB 201 
Economics I as the humanities/social science elective in the fall semester and CH 107 General Chemistry II (i cr.) in the 
spring. Freshman year credits equal 32 hours. 



Fall Semester 

CH221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

CHE 205 Chemical Proc. Principles 4 

CSC 112 Intro, to Comp.— FORTRAN 3 

MA 242 Aniy. Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective' 3 

18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Credits Spring Seynester Credits 
Organic Chemistry II 4 



CH223 

CHE 225 Chemical Proc. Systems 3 

MA 341 Applied Differential Equations I 3 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

Is 



173 



JUNIOR YEAR 
FallSemrMer Credits Spring Semester Credits 



BS 100 General Biology 



4 BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry 3 



CHK 311 Transport Processes I 3 BCH 452 Introductory Biocheni.stry Lab 2 

CHE 315 Chem. Proc. Thermodynamics 3 CHE 312 Transport Processes II . ..... . _ . ..... 3 

ECE 3.31 Frinc. of Elect. Engr. I or CHE 316 Thermo. Chem.cal & Phase Equilibria . . 3 

MAT 201 Structure & Prop. Engr. Mafis 3 CHE 330 Chemical Engmeenng Lab I 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Humanities/Social Science Elective' ._3 

Free Elective _^ 17 

17 
SENIOR YEAR 

FallSemexter Credits Spring Semeitter Credit 

CH 437 Physical Chemistry for Engineers 4 CHE 425 Process System Analysis & Control 3 

CHE:«1 Chemical Engr. Ub II 3 CHE 451 Chemical Engr Design 3 

CHE 446 Design & Anlv. of Chem. Reactors 3 CHE 551 Biochemical Engineering 3 

CHE 450 Chem. Engr. Design I 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chem. Engr 1 Free Electives _6 



Humanities/Social Science Elective' ^ 

I? 



18 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 137 
'Humanities and social science requirement courses must be selected from the approved College of Engineering list. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Mann Hall (Room 203) 

Professor E. Downey Brill. Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor H. E. Wahls, Associate Head for Graduate Programs 

Professor J. S. Fisher, Associate Head 

Professor J. F. Ely, Coordinator of Advising 

Distinguished University Professor: P. Z. Zia 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: P. D. Cribbins 

Harrelson Professor: P. H. McDonald 

Pro/fSHom: P. D. Cribbins. R. A. Douglas. W. S. Galler. A. K. Gupta. K. S. Havner. Y. Horie. D. W.Johnston. N. P. Khosla. 
P. H. McDonald. C. C. Tung. P. Zia; Adjunct Profexsor: R. C. Heath; Professors Emeriti: M. Amein. W. F. Babcock. R. E. 
Fadum. C. L. Heimbach. J. W. Horn. A. I. Kashef. C. L. Mann, Jr.. S. W. Nunnally, C. Smallwood. Jr., M. E. Uyanik; 
A!<s()ciate Professors: S. H. Ahmad. W. L. Bingham. R. H. Borden, A. C. Chao. E. D. Gurley. P. C. Lambe. H. R. Malcom. 
V. C. Matzen. J. M. Nau. M. F. Overton. M. S. Rahman, W. J. Rasdorf. J. C. Smith. J. R. Stone: Associate Professor 
Knierilus: G. R. Taylor; Assistant Professors: M. A. Barlaz. J. W. Baugh. Jr.. R. C. Borden. F. Farid. Y. R. Kim. A. E. 
Schultz; Adjunct Assistant Professors: J. C. Brantley. III. L. R. Goode. B. E. Matthews. R. R. Rust; Lecturers: M. L. 
Iteming. D..I. Lombirdi: Lecturer and Senior Construction Extension Specialist: P . P. McCair). Adjunct Lecturers: R.F . 
DeBruhl. J. A. K. Tucker; Senior Extension Specialist: S. M. Rogers. Jr. 

Civilengineerinp:, one of the broadest of the engineering fields, traditionally concerns the 
improvement and control of the environment. A civil engineer may deal with the planning, 
design, construction, operation and maintenance of everything from buildings, bridges, 
dams, harbors, water and power facilities, sewage disposal works, and nuclear waste 
facilities to transportation systems like highways, railways, waterways, airports and pipe 
lines. 

The Department of Civil Engineering offers curricula that provide academic prepara- 
tion for students considering a career in civil engineering or construction. The sound 
general education of the undergraduate program prepares the student for advanced study 
either through graduate study or self-study. 



174 



The Civil Engineering Program, which is accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Civil 
Engineering. The Civil Engineering-Construction Option Program, also accredited by 
ABET, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering-Construction 
Option. The new Construction Management Program will be presented for accreditation to 
the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE), following graduation of the 
first class. This program leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Construction 
Management. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Man will always need constructed facilities to live, work and sustain his life, and the civil 
engineer will always be needed to plan, design and construct these facilities. Civil engineer- 
ing is such a diversified field that a civil engineering graduate has a wide choice in locations 
and types of employment. Jobs range from federal, state or municipal agencies to a variety 
of manufacturing and processing industries, consulting firms or construction companies. 
The work may be performed partially or wholly in an office or in the field and may be 
located in a small community, a large industry center or in a foreign country. Careers in 
teaching and research are common for many civil engineers who complete advanced 
degrees. 

FACILITIES 

Open access is available to the department's micro-computer laboratory providing sup- 
port in analysis, design-synthesis and word processing. Laboratories for testing structural 
materials, large models or full-scale structures, for soils and bituminous products, for 
hydraulic experiments, for analysis of small structural models, for chemical and biological 
tests pertaining to sanitary engineering, and for the investigation of transportation prob- 
lems all help students learn more about their field. 

CURRICULA IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Three four-year undergraduate curricula are offered; one leads to a Bachelor of Science 
in Civil Engineering; the second, to a Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering- 
Construction Option; and the third, to a Bachelor of Science in Construction Management. 

The civil engineering curriculum is a balanced program providing academic discipline 
in the pure and applied physical sciences, the humanities and social sciences, and the 
professional aspects of civil engineering including structural, transportation and water 
resources engineering, and soil mechanics and foundations. 

The curriculum in the civil engineering-construction option is designed for students 
interested in the construction phases of civil engineering. It includes the core course 
requirements in the physical sciences and the social sciences and humanities. The curricu- 
lum includes a three-semester sequence of courses in cost analysis and control, and con- 
struction methods and planning. These courses provide academic discipline in the engi- 
neering, planning and management aspects of construction. Graduates of the construction 
option curriculum prepare to become construction engineers. 

The bachelor of science in construction management is offered for students interested in 
entering the construction industry in management and administrative functions. Gradu- 
ates of this curriculum are exposed to the broader construction management problems 
involving business and finance along with the necessary engineering training. This curric- 
ulum features an off-campus internship program during two summers, one between the 
sophomore and junior year and the second between the junior and senior year, with a 
construction firm. During the senior year, the student selects a construction concentration 
in either general construction, mechanical construction or electrical construction. Gradu- 
ates usually become construction managers responsible for managing a number of con- 
struction projects. 



175 



CIVIL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semegter Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

E 100 Introduction to COE 

E115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective ^ 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 110 Intro, to Comp.— Pascal 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 

15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semegter CrediUs 

CE 200 Civil Engr. Meas. & Surveys 3 

CE 214 Engineering Mechanics— Statics 3 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 



Credits 



Physical Education Elective 



Spring Semester 

CE 215 Engr. Mech.— Dynamics 3 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 3 

MA 341 Appl. Differential Equations I 3 

MAT 200 Mech. Prop, of Structural Mat'ls 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16 



Fall Semester 

CE 324 Structural Behavior Measurement 1 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 

CE 375 Civil Engineering Systems 3 

CE 382 Hydraulics 3 

CE381 Hydraulics Lab 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Credits Spring Sernester Credits 
Traffic Engineering 3 



CE305 

CE 327 Reinforced Concrete Design 3 

CE342 Engr. Behavior of Soils & Found 4 

CE383 Hydrology & Urban Water Sys 3 

Basic Science Elective^ 4 

17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

ECE:«1 Princ. of Elect. Engr. I or 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 

ENG 331 Communic. Engr. & Tech. or 

CE Design Elective P 3 

Engineering Science Elective' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

Is 



Spring Semester Credits 

CE Design Elective IP 3 

Humanities/Social Science Electives' 6 

Free Electives 6 

15 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 131 



'Humanities or social science courses to be selected from the appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering. 
'Basic Science Elective(Select one): BS 100 General Biolog./(4):CH 107 Prineiplesof Chemistry (4); or MEA 101 Geology I: 
Physical (3) and MEA 110 Geologj' I Laboratory (1). 
'Approved Electives: 



Dexign Electives 

Pick two from list and include at least one course mth 
axterigk 

•CE400 

CE406 

CE420 
•CE 426 

CE428 
♦CE 440 

CE 443 

CE 466 
•CE 480 

CE484 

CE502 

CE 50.-} 

CE 572 

CE 583 

CE585 



Transportation Engr. Project 

Transportation Systems Engr. 

Structural Engr. Project 

Structural Steel Design 

Structural Design in Wood 

Geoiechnical Engr. Project (Foundations) 

Seepage. Earth Embank. & ReUin. Struct. 

Building Construction in Engr. 

Water Resources Engr. Project 

Water Supply & Waste Water Systems 

Transportation Operations 

Transportation Design 

Design of Water & Wa.stewater Facilities 

Engr. Aspects of Coa.stal Processes 

Urban Stormwater Management 



Engineering Science Electives 

ECE 331 Principles of Electrical Engr. I 
MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 
MAT 400 Metallic Mat'ls in Engineering Design 
CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis 

Transportation Engr. Analysis 

Continuum Mechanics I 

Theory of Elasticity I 

Stress Waves 

Advance Strength of Materials 

Flow in Open Channels 

Ground Water Hydraulics 



CE501 
CE511 
CE513 
CE514 
CE521 
CE 580 
CE 584 
MEA 461 Engineering Geology 



176 



CIVIL ENGINEERING— CONSTRUCTION OPTION CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

See the freshman year for the curriculum in civil engineering. Students should select EB 201 Economics I as their 
humanities and social sciences elective. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics— Dynamics 3 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 3 

MA 341 Appl. Differential Equations I 3 

MAT 200 Mechanical Prop, of Struc. Mat'l 3 

Humanities/Social Sciences Elective' 3 

. 1 Physical Education Elective ^ 

1? 16 



Fall Semester 

CE 200 Civil Engineering Meas. & Surveys 3 

CE 214 Engineering Mechanics— Statics 3 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

Physical Education Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Sem£ster Credits Spring Semester 

CE 325 Structural Analysis 3 CE 327 

CE 332 Materials of Construction 3 CE 342 

CE 375 Civil Engineering Systems 3 CE 365 

CE 382 Hydraulics 3 CE 305 

CE 463 Constr. Estim. Planning & Control 3 CE 367 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 CE 383 

18 



Credits 

Reinforced Concrete Design 3 

Engr. Behavior of Soils & Founda 4 

Construction Equipment & Methods 3 

Traffic Engineering or 

Mech. & Elect. Syst. in Building or 

Hydrology & Urban Water Systems 3 

Basic Science Elective^ • 4 

17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CE 426 Steel Design 3 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 3 

CE 466 Building Construction Engr 3 

ECE 331 Princ. of Electrical Engr. I or 

MAE 301 Engineering Thermodynamics I 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Free Elective ^ 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting or 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 3 

CE469 Construction Engineering Proj 3 

Humanities/Social Science Electives' 6 

Free Electives ^ 

18 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 135 



'Humanities or Social Sciences courses to be selected from the appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering. 
2Basic Science elective (Select one): BS 100 General Biology (4): CH 107 Principles of Chemistry (4); or MEA 101 Geology I: 
Physical (3) and MEA 110 Geology I Laboratory (1). 

CIVIL ENGINEERING— CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

See the freshmen year for the civil engineering curriculum. Students in Construction Management should take EB 201 
Economics I as the humanities and social sciences elective in the fall. 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fail Semester 



Civil Engr. Meas. & Surveys 3 

Engineering Mechanics— Statics 3 

Engineering Graphics 2 

Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

Physics for Scientists & Engineers II 4 



CE200 
CE214 
GC 101 
MA 242 
PY208 
Physical Education Elective 



Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CE 215 Engineering Mechanics— Dynamics 3 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 3 

EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 

MA 341 Applied Differential Equations I 3 

MAT 200 Mech. Prop, of Structural Mat'ls 3 

. 1 Physical Education Elective ^ 

1? 16 



177 



SUMMER INTERNSHIP: OFF-CAMPUS^ 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semegter Credits Spring Semester Crediti 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 CE 367 Mech. & Elect. Syst. in Bids 3 

CE322 Materials of Construction 3 COM(SP) 146 Business & Prof.. Communications .. 3 

CE463 Const. Estim.. Planning* Ctrl 3 EB 302 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 

Construction Concentration Elective' 3 EB 320 Financial Management 3 

Construction Concentration Elective' 3 Construction Concentration Elective' 3 

Construction Concentration Lab Elective' ^ Construction Concentration Elective' ^ 

16 18 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP: OFF-CAMPUS^ 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting 3 CE 469 Construction Engr. Project 3 

EB 313 Marketing Methods or Advanced Humanities Elective^ 3 

EB 325 Managerial Economics 3 Construction Concentration Elective' 3 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 3 History/Philosophy of Science Elective^ 3 

Intro. Humanities Elective^ 3 Free Electives 6 

Construction Concentration Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

Is 



18 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 134 



CE327 


3 


CE342 


4 


CE426 


3 


CE465 


3 


CE466 


3 



'CONSTRUCTION CONCENTRATION ELECTIVES (Select one group) 

General Construction Electrical Construction Mechanical Construction 

CE325 3 ECE331 3 CE 324 1 

ECE339 1 ECE331 3 

ECE305 3 MAE 301 3 

and J, of the follomng MAE 302 3 

ECE332 3 MAE 316 3 

ECE451 3 MAE 403 3 

ECE 452 3 and one of the folloiving 

ECE453 3 MAE 310 3 

ECE 454 3 MAE 404 3 

^Humanities courses to be selected from the appropriate list approved by the College of Engineering. Social Science 

requirements are fulfilled by EB 201, EB 301 and EB 302. 
'In addition to the course work, the graduation requirement also includes a minimum often weeks of summer cooperative 

internship in the sophomore and junior years. The internships are spent off campus within the construction industry. 

Prior approval of internship activities must be obtained from the program director. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE STUDY IN CIVIL ENGINEERING 

If a student is interested in more intense specialization in a particular area of civil 
engineering, advanced level training is available leading to the Professional Degree in Civil 
Engineering, the Master of Science in Civil Engineering, the Master of Civil Engineering, 
or the Doctor of Philosophy. Specialization areas include coastal and ocean engineering, 
construction engineering and management, construction materials, environmental and 
water resources engineering, geotechnical engineering, mechanics and structural engi- 
neering and transportation engineering. With judicial choice of electives, a student may 
also prepare for additional study in law, business administration, business management 
and city and regional planning. The Department of Economics and Business offers a 
Master of Science in Management with several technical options including Civil Engi- 
neering—Construction. 



178 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Withers Hall (Room 226 and 208) 

Professor R. E. Funderlic, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor T. L. Honeycutt, Associate Head of the Department 

Lecturer J. Hatch, Assistant Head of the Department, Coordinator of Advising 

Distinguished University Research Professor: D. L. Bitzer 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: A. L. Tharp 

Profensors: W. Chou, R. E. Funderlic, D. C. Martin, D. F. McAllister, H. G. Perros, R. J. Plemmons, W. J. Stewart, K. C. 
Tai, A. L.ThsLTp; Associate Professors: } . A. Bowen, E. W. Davis, Jr., R.J. Fornaro, E. F.Gehringer, T. L. Honeycutt, H. 
D. Levin, W. E. Robbins, R. D. Rodman, C. D. Savage, M. F. Stallmann; Adjunct Associate Professor: V. Ahuja; 
Assistant Professors: D. R. Bahler, W. R. Cleaveland, III, R. A. Dwyer, P. J. Lanzkron, A. Ola, D. S. Reeves, M. A. Vouk; 
Adjunct Assistant Professors: N. M. Bengtson, K. D. Clark; Lecturers: S. J. Curtis, G. N. Fostel, J. Hatch, J. E. Perry: 
Adjunct Lecturers: E. W. Galloway. D. A. Lasher, W. D. Ruchte, D. A. Schur, E. R. Secrest, W. W. Turyn, Jr., R. W, 
Weeks, S. G. Worth, III; Laboratory Supervisor: W. G. Scott. Jr.; Instructor: K. S. Bryant; Research Assistants: K. P. 
Garrard. L. W. Taylor; Associate Members of the Department: J. W. Baugh. Jr. (Civil Engineering). C. D. Meyer. Jr. 
(Mathematics), W. J. Rasdorf (Civil Engineering). 

The discipline of computer science has developed during the past three decades as a 
direct consequence of rapid growth of computers. This unprecedented technical revolution 
has made computers a part of life. Almost all areas of industry, the military establishment, 
government agencies, education and business use computers, and new applications con- 
tinue to arise. Computers are used to help make and operate our automobiles, airplanes and 
spaceships; to help design our highways, bridges and buildings; to handle banking transac- 
tions and to assist in management decisions; to analyze farm production; as a research tool 
for the scientist; to monitor manufacturing processes, utilities and communication; and to 
provide a multitude of other services. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

A wide range of jobs exist for computer scientists since computers have diverse applica- 
tions. There is a need for basic research into the principles of computer system design and 
the analysis of computational algorithms, and students may choose to continue their train- 
ing with graduate study. 

CURRICULUM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

This undergraduate curriculum leads to a degree of Bachelor of Science in Computer 
Science. This program is accredited by the Computer Science Accreditation Commission of 
the Computer Science Accreditation Board. Core courses provide foundations in pro- 
gramming and computer languages, the structure of data, computer architecture, numeri- 
cal analysis, and the theory of computation and programming languages. The restricted 
electives chosen in consultation with one's adviser during the junior year allow exploration 
of specific computer science areas or fields such as management information systems, 
database management systems, simulation, graphics, and software engineering. 

Students in other departments may select courses in computer science as electives to 
broaden their programs of study and to learn how to use the computer for solving problems. 

Before a computer science major is eligible to enroll in any 200 or 300 level required 
course in computer science the student must have a 2.00 or higher grade point average. 



179 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CSC 110 Intro, to Comp.-Pascal 3 

E 100 Introduction to COE ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

E 1 15 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 Physical Education Elective M. 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 15 

Humanities/Social Science Elective • 3 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semexter Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 210 Programming Lang. Concepts 3 CSC 201 Basic Comp. Org. & Assm. Lang 3 

CSC 222 Discrete Math. Structures 3 CSC 311 Data Structures 3 

EB 201 Economics 3 MA 305 Intro. Linear Alg. & Mat 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 Basic Science 3 

PY 208 General Physics II 4 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective ^ Physical Education Elective ^ 

18 16 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 202 Operating Systems 3 CSC 310 Software Engineering 3 

CSC 302 Numerical Methods 3 CSC 312 Comp. Organization & Logic 4 

ST 371 Intro, to Prob. & Dist. Theo 3 ENG 331 Communication of Tech. Info 3 

CSC Restricted Elective^ 3 CSC Restricted Elective^ 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 CSC Theory Course^ 3 

Free Elective 3 ~^ 

18 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC Project Course 3 CSC Restricted Elective^ 3 

CSC Restricted Elective^ 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Restricted Electives'^ 6 

Restricted Elective^ 3 Free Elective 3 



Free Elective 3 

Is 



15 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 129'' 



'To be taken according to the requirements of the College of Engineering. 

H3ontact coordinator of advising for list of approved courses. 

'A single course offered for the first time in the academic year 1991-1992 will be the only course that satisfies the theory 
course requirement for students who enter the CSC program after May 1990. 

'The GPA earned in all courses attempted at NCSU must be 2.0 or higher to satisfy University graduation requirements. 
I n addition, the College of Engineering requires either a GPA of 2.0 or higher in all courses bearing the CSC designation, 
or a grade of C or higher in each CSC course used to satisfy the requirement of the major. 

MINOR IN COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 

The Department of Computer Science offers a minor in computer programming to 
majors in any field except computer science and computer engineering. Tiie minor consists 
of the completion with a grade of C or higher of CSC 101 or 110, 102 or 210, 201, 202, 311, a 
second programming language (COBOL, FORTRAN, 370 Assembler, SNOBOL, C,Ada), 
and MA 121 (or any calculus course). At least four of these seven courses must be taken at 
NCSU. 



180 



ELECTRICAL AND COMPUTER 
ENGINEERING 

Daniels Hall (Room 232) 

Professor R. K. Cavin, III, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor W. T. Easter, Associate Head of the Department 

Visiting Assistant Professor G. E. Edgington, Graduate Coordinator 

Lecturer J. H. Larson, Coordinator of Advising 

University Professor: D. R. Rhodes 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M. A. Littlejohn 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: J. B. O'Neal, Jr. 

Professors: D. P. Agrawal, W. E. Alexander, B.J. Baliga, S. M. Bedair, W. Chou, T. H. Glisson, J. J. Grainger, J. R. Hauser, 
J. F. Kauffman, R. M. Kalbas, M. A. Littlejohn, N. A, Masnari, N. F. J. Matthews, L. K. Monteith, H. T. Nagle. Jr., A. A. 
Nilsson, J. B. O'Neal, Jr., C. M. Osburn, A. Reisman, D. R. Rhodes, R. J. Trew, H. J. Trussell, A. VanderLugt, J. J. 
Wortman; Adjunct Professors: E. Brglez, E. Christian, W. A. Flood. J. W. Gault, W. L. Glomb, W. C. Holton, G. J. 
lafrate, M. A. Stroscio, R. Tsu; Professors Emeriti:'^ .i. Barclay, A. R. Eckles, A. J. Goetze, G. B. Hoadley, F.J. Tischer; 
Associate Professors: S. T. Alexander, G. F. Bland, D. F. Gehringer, W. T. Liu. R. C. Luo, T. K. Miller. lU, J. J. Paulos, 
S. A. Rajala. W. E. Snyder, M. W. Wh\te;Adjiinct Associate Professors: J.J. Brickley, Jr., J. R. Burke, T. K. Burke, J. A. 
Hutchby, J. R. Jones, S. H. Lee, H. L. Martin, J. W. Mink; Associate Professors Emeriti: N. R. Bell, E. G. Manning, W. C. 
Peterson, W. P. Seagraves, E. W. Winkler: Assistant Professors: S. Ardalan, R. S. Colby, R. S. Gyurcsik, A. W. Kelly, 
D. S. Reeves, G. A. Ruggles, M. B. Steer, J. K. Townsend, D. E. Van den Bout; Adjunct As.^istant Professors: D. L. 
Dreifus. J. H. Hong, D. W. Hislop, T. H. Hubing, M. Lorenzetti, P. Santago. C. K. Williams; Assistant Professor 
Emerittis: L. R. Herman; Lec^Mrer.s.C. C. Cockrell, R. T. Kuehn, J. H. SheWy: Adjunct Lecturers: C. E. Branscomb, J. C. 
Greeson, P. T. Hutchinson, J. W. Watterson; Research Associates: G. L. Bilbro, J. Ramdani; Research Assistants: E. S. 
Condon, J. M. O'Sullivan; Associate Members of the Department: S. Khorram (Forestry), G. Lucovsky (Physics), J. 
Narayan (Materials Science and Engineering), J. F. Schetzina (Physics). 

The professions of electrical engineering and computer engineering are concerned with 
the design, construction and testing of systems based on electrical phenomena. In contem- 
porary technological society, electrical methods are used to communicate and store infor- 
mation, control equipment and systems, perform mathematical operations, and convert 
energy from one form to another. Frequently, two or more of these functions are important 
in the design of systems such as radio, television, telecommunications, computers, indus- 
trial robots, telemetry, electric machinery, and systems for generation and transmission of 
electric power. 

Computer engineering is a field in which digital techniques are used in system design. 
Low-cost solid state microprocessors and memories permit computers to be widely incor- 
porated in many different types of electronic systems. To work effectively in this rapidly 
growing field, the computer engineer must understand both hardware and software tech- 
niques and must effectively use both techniques in order to design, build and test optimum 
systems. 

Both the Electrical Engineering and the Computer Engineering Programs, which lead 
to the degrees. Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering and Bachelor of Science in 
Computer Engineering, respectively, are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Superior academic performance is recognized within this department in three ways: 
election of students to membership in the electrical engineering honor society. Eta Kappa 
Nu; awarding of merit scholarships; and presentation of awards to outstanding seniors. The 
department has seven endowed merit scholarships which are usually awarded to juniors or 
seniors: Elizabeth P. Cockrell, L. A. Mahler, Amelia N. Mitta, Frank T. Pankotay, E. 
Chester Seewald, North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, and William D. 
Stevenson, Jr., the latter two of which are for students studying electric power systems. In 



181 



addition, the William M. Gates Scholarship Program provides multiple scholarships for 
students having documented financial need and high academic performance. These are 
awarded to juniors, with provision for continuation in the senior year. The department also 
from time to time has scholarships provided by industrial organizations such as Mitsubishi 
Semiconductor. National Machine Tool Builders Association, and United Technologies. 
Merit is generally the primary requirement for these awards, but other characteristics, 
such as leadership, may also be specified. 

FACILITIES 

Many courses are accompanied by coordinated work in laboratory. Up-to-date facilities 
are provided for experimental study of electric and electronic circuits, digital systems, 
microprocessors, computers, electric machinery, VLSI design and fabrication, robotics, 
communication systems, and microwave systems. A new undergraduate computing labora- 
tory features 30 microVAX workstations and 10 IBM personal computers with a VAX 3600 
file server connected to the campus Ethernet. Substantial expansion of these facilities is 
planned for fall 1990. 

CORE COURSES 

The electrical and computer engineering curricula share core courses comprising a 
substantial portion of the first three years of study. Strong emphasis is placed on fundamen- 
tal concepts in core courses so that graduates are prepared for rapid technological changes 
common in the electrical and computer engineering professions. A comprehensive founda- 
tion in mathematics and the physical sciences in the freshman year is followed in subse- 
quent years with additional core courses in mathematics, physics, electric circuit theory, 
digital logic, computer systems, electronics, linear systems, and mechanics. Laboratory 
work is designed to demonstrate fundamental principles and to provide experience in 
designing and testing electronic hardware and computer software. Both curricula have 
required senior design courses which give students comprehensive experience in design- 
ing, building and testing physical systems. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

In addition to the core courses described above, students in the electrical engineering 
curriculum take courses in electromagnetic fields, solid-state devices, and electric power 
systems in their junior year and thermodynamics in their senior year. Students may choose 
a broad or concentrated path of study in the senior year by taking three senior courses of 
their choice. More than 20 elective courses are offered in communications, microelectron- 
ics, digital systems, robotics, electromagnetics, and electric power systems. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CSC 110 Intro, to Comp.— Pascal 3 

E 100 Introduction to COE ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

E115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 MA241 Analytic Geometry & Caic. II 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 Physical Education Elective 1 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 " , — 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

le 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 CE 213 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

ECE211 Electric Circuits P 3 ECE 212 Fund, of Logic Design' 3 

ECE213 Electric Circuits I Lab 1 ECE 214 Fund, of Logic Design Lab 1 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 ECE 221 Electric Circuits II' 3 

PY 208 Physics Engrs. & Seien. II 4 ECE 223 Electric Circuits II Lab 1 

Physical Education Elective 1 MA 341 Differential Equations 3 



16 



Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 



182 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

COM (SP) 301 Presentational Speaking 3 

ECE 301 Linear Systems 3 

ECE 303 Electromagnetic Fields 3 

ECE 314 Electronic Circuits 3 

MA 314 Probability. Appl. to ECE 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective- 3 

18 



Spring Semester Credits 

ECE 218 Comp. Org. & Microproc.' 3 

ECE 305 Electric Power Systems 3 

ECE 341 Solid State Devices 3 

ENG 331 Communication Engr. & Tech 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective- 3 

Free Elective 3 

18 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

MA 301 Engr. Thermodynamics 3 

Approved Department Elective' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Numerical Methods Elective' 3 

Senior Design Elective' 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

ECE 480 EE Senior Design Project 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Senior Design Elective' 3 

Free Electives 6 

16 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 132^ 



'Must be completed with a grade of C or higher. 

To be taken according to requirements of the College of Engineering. 

'Contact coordinator of advising for list of approved courses. 

^The GPA earned in all courses attempted at NCSU must be 2.0 or higher to satisfy University graduation requirements. 
In addition, the college required either (1) a GPA of 2.0 or higher in all courses bearing the ECE designation of (2)agrade 
of C or higher in each ECE course used to satisfy requirements in the major. Graduation requirements also include 
attendance at two professional technical society meetings during the junior and senior years. The student is responsible 
for providing documentation showing satisfaction of this requirement. 

COMPUTER ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

In addition to the core courses described above, students in the computer engineering 
curriculum take courses in discrete mathematics, design of complex digital systems, 
advanced programming, operating systems, and data structures in their sophomore and 
junior years. Students may choose a broad or concentrated path of study in their senior year 
by taking three senior courses of their choice. A variety of elective courses are offered in 
communications, microelectronics, digital systems, controls, and VLSI design. In addition, 
several senior-level courses in computer science are approved as elective courses for compu- 
ter engineering. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
See the freshman year for the electrical engineering curriculum. Freshman year credits equal 31 hours. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credit 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

CSC 210 Programming Language Concepts 3 

ECE 212 Fund, of Logic Design' 3 

ECE 214 Fund. Logic Design Lab 1 

MA 242 Analy. Geom. & Calc. Ill 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

18 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



CSC 222 Discrete Math. Structures 3 

ECE 211 Electric Circuits I' 3 

ECE 213 Electric Circuits Lab 1 

ECE 218 Comp. Org. & Microproc.'-' 3 

MA 341 Differential Equations 3 

PY 208 Physics Engrs. & Scien. II 4 



Physical Education Elective 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ECE 221 Electric Circuits II' 3 

ECE 223 Electric Circuits II Lab 1 

ECE 342 Dsgn. Complex Digital Syst 3 

MA 314 Probability. Applic. to ECE 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 



Credits 



Spring Seynester 

CSC 202 Concepts, Facil. Op. Syst.' 3 

CSC 311 Data Structures 3 

ECE 301 Linear Systems 3 

ECE 314 Electronic Circuits 3 

ENG 331 Communic. Engr. & Tech 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

18 



183 



SENIOR YEAR 

FaU Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CE213 Intro, to Mechanics 3 ECE 481 CPE Senior Design Project 4 

CPE Senior Elective' 3 CPE Senior Elective* 3 

Humanities/ Social Science Elective^ 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Senior Design Elective* 3 Numerical Methods Elective* 3 

Free Elective ^ Free Elective _3 

15 16 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 132' 

'Must be completed with a grade of C or higher. 

To be Uken according to the requirements of the Engineering College. 

>ECE 218 serves as prerequisite to CSC 202 in lieu of CSC 201. 

•Contact coordinator of advising for list of approved courses. 

'The College requires either (1 » a GPA of 2.0 or higher on all courses bearing the ECE designation or (2) a grade of C or 
higher in each ECE course used to satisfy requirements in the major. CSC courses used for CPE Senior Electives must 
satisfy the same grade requirements as ECE courses in (1) and (2) above. Graduation requirements also include 
attendance at two professional technical society meetings during the junior and senior years. The student is responsible 
for providing documentation showing satisfaction of this requirement. 



ENGINEERING 

Page Hall (Room 120) 

The B. S. in Engineering degree offers an individualized academic program for those 
exceptional students who have academic and career goals that can not be accommodated by 
the other engineering degree programs. Before being admitted into the program, students 
must complete the freshmen year, have at least a 2.5 grade point average, have completed 
the course requirement for admission into an engineering degree program and have a plan 
of study approved by the student's advisory committee and the dean. For information about 
the program, contact the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories (Room 328) 

Professor S. D. Roberts, Head 

Lecturer C. L. Smith, Assistant Department Head 

University Professor: S. E. Elmaghraby 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: C. L. Smith 

James T. Ryan Professor: A. L. Prak 

Profensors: M. A. Ayoub. R. H. Bernhard. J. R. Canada, S. E. Elmaghraby. S. C. Prang, T. J. Hodgson, H. L. W. Nuttle. P. 
J. O'Grady. R. G Pearson. A. L. Prak, W. A. Smith. Jr.: Professors Emeriti: R. E. Alvarez. C. A. Anderson, J. J. Harder, 
R. W. Llewellyn: Associate Professors: C. T. Culbreth, Y. Fathi. E. T. Sanii. R. E. Young: Assistant Professors: D. W. 
Aldrich. J. F. Antin. D. P. Bischak. R. E. King. R. 0. Mittal. J. Trevino: Lecturers; J. A. Ekwall, W. G. Morrissey, L. M. 

Struble. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

The industrial engineer designs, improves, and installs integrated systems of people, 
materials, equipment, and information, drawing upon specialized knowledge and skill in 
the mathematical, physical and social sciences, together with the principles and methods of 
engineering analysis and design to specify, predict and evaluate the results to be obtained 



184 



from these systems. Productivity and effective utilization of resources, including energy 
conservation, are principle concerns of practitioners. The industrial engineer may develop 
operations or improvements for many diverse activities, such as a hospital, a department 
store, a manufacturing enterprise, an insurance office or government function. His or her 
position in an organization is usually as a management advisor in contact with every phase 
of the organization. 

The curriculum blends a basic group of common engineering technical courses with 
specialized courses in the major areas of industrial engineering— design of human and 
machine systems, design of management control systems, and improvement of manufac- 
turing operations. The course offerings stress mathematical and statistical techniques of 
industrial systems analysis: quantitative methodologies of operations research; computers 
as a tool for problem solving and simulation; economic considerations of alternatives; 
control of product or service quality and quantity; specifications of the manufacturing 
process including the equipment and tooling; and the utilization of safety and human 
factors engineering principles. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Senuster Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CHlOl General Chemistry I 4 CSC 110 Intro, to Comp.— FORTRAN 3 

E 100 Introduction to COE ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

E 115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 Physical Education Elective 1 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 ^ 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

IE 100 Intro, to Industrial Engr 1 ECE 331 Princ. of Electrical Engr 3 

MA 242 Anal.nic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 GC 101 Engineering Graphics 2 

MAT 201 Struct. & Prop.— Engr. Mat"! 3 IE 307 Process Control Comp 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 IE 311 Engr. Economics Analysis 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 MA 341 Applied Differential Equ. I 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 ST 371 Intro. Prob. & Dist. Theory 3 



16 



Physical Education Elective 1 

18 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 331 Commun. Tech. Information 3 IE 352 Work Analysis & Design 3 

IE 351 Manufacturing Engineering 3 IE 401 Stochastic Models in IE 3 

IE 361 Determination Models in IE 3 IE 443 Quality Control 3 

MAE 206 Engineering Statics 3 IE 452 Ergonomics 3 

ST 372 Intro. Stat. Infer. & Regr 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 Free Elective 3 

"Ti 18 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 IE 498 Senior Project/Design Course 3 

IE 308 Control Prod. & Serv. System 3 Engineering Science Electives' 6 

IE 441 Intro, to Simulation 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

IE 453 Facilities Design 3 Free Elective 3 



15 



Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

18 Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ...134 



'Must be completed with grrade of C or better. 
^0 be taken according to COE requirements. 

^Students select from approved departmental list (MAE 208. MAE 301, MAE 302. MAE 308. MAE 314. ECE 332). 
'Graduation requirements include: (a) 2.0 overall GPA. or higher, in all courses attempted at NCSU and (b) 2.0 GPA in all 
IE designated courses or a C or better in all IE designated courses. 



185 



MINOR IN INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

To obtain a minor in industrial engineering a student must complete a minimum of 
fifteen hours from courses given on the departmental list. Students wishing to complete the 
minor requirements must make application to the Department of Industrial Engineering 
and must meet the same academic criteria used for transfer applications. 



FURNITURE MANUFACTURING AND 
MANAGEMENT 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories (Room 343) 
Lecturer W. G. Morrissey, Program Director 

Asaoeiate Professor: C. T. Culbreth; Assistant Professor: D. W. Aldrich. 

The Furniture Manufacturing and Management program at NCSU is the only one of its 
kind in the United States. The furniture industry is concentrated in the Southeast with over 
50 percent of the national output of wooden household furniture being produced within a 
200 mile radius of High Point, North Carolina. The industry is in a period of rapid change 
due to the introduction of sophisticated computer-based manufacturing methods and con- 
trol systems. 

Attracting students on an international basis, the FMM program offers a manufacturing 
engineering education focusing on the materials, products, and processes of the furniture 
industry. The need for professionals having an engineering education will increase as the 
industry continues to automate its operations. Graduates will find challenging careers as 
engineers and managers in this important industry. 

The faculty has industrial experience and maintains close contact with the furniture 
industry through involvement with the American Furniture Manufacturers Association 
and by conducting applied research and extension activities. The industry assists students 
by providing jobs in the cooperative education program and by making scholarship aid 
available through the Furniture Foundation, Inc. In addition, there are a number of private 
scholarships funded by generous individuals to commemorate prominent furniture 
executives. 

CURRICULUM IN FURNITURE MANUFACTURING 
AND MANAGEMENT 

The Bachelor of Science degree in furniture manufacturing and management prepares 
graduates for engineering and managerial positions in the furniture industry. 

The curriculum stresses the application of engineering principles and computer-based 
controls to furniture manufacturing. Students have the opportunity to work with Computer 
Aided Design (CAD) systems and computer numerically controlled (CNC) machines. 
Related subjects, such as management, accounting, and economic analysis, address the 
business aspects of modern furniture production. 

In addition to academic course work, a minimum of six weeks of continuous, gainful 
employment in a furniture manufacturing plant is required. Usually, such employment 
occurs between the junior and senior years. 



186 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

See the freshman year for the industrial engineering curriculum. Furniture manufacturing and management students 
should take EB 201 Economics I as the fall humanities/ social science elective and CSC 112 Intro, to Computing— 
FORTRAN in the spring. Freshman year credits equal 31 hours. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 ECE 331 Princ. of Elect. Engr 3 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics 2 IE 241 Furniture Manufac. Proc. I 3 

IE lOOF Intro, to IE (FMM) 3 IE 307 Proc. Control Computing 3 

IE 240 Furniture Product Engr 1 ST 361 Intro, to Stat, for Engr 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 WPS 202 Wood Struct. & Prop. I 3 

Humanities Elective (Introductory) 3 Physical Education Elective ^ 

Physical Education Elective ^ 16 

17 
SUMMER 

WPS 205 Wood Products Practicum 5 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 IE 311 Engr. Economic Analysis 3 

ENG 331 Commun. for Tech. Info 3 IE 341 Furniture Plant Layout 3 

IE 340 Furn. Mfg. Proc. II 4 History/Philosophy of Science 3 

IE 345 Princ. of Upholstery 2 Social Science Elective (Introductory) 3 

IE 352 Work Analysis & Design 3 Free Elective _3 

Humanities Elective (Advanced) ^ 15 

18 
SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EB 326 Human Resource Management 3 IE 440 Furn. Mgm't. Analysis 3 

IE 371 Furn. Prod. Control 3 IE 472 Quant. Meth.— Furn. Mfg 4 

IE 443 Quality Control 3 Social Science Elective (Advanced) 3 

Technical Elective 3 Technical Elective 2 

Free Elective ^ Free Elective ^ 

IE 15 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 132' 
'Also required for graduation: Six weeks of industrial employment. 



MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

Riddick Engineering Laboratories (Room 229) 

Professor J.J. Hren, Head of the Department 

Professor C. C. Koch, Associate Department Head 

Professor A. A. Fahmy, Graduate Administrator 

Lecturer R. L. Porter, Undergraduate Coordinator 

Kobe Steel Distinguished University Professor: R. F. Davis 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: R. L. Porter 

Professors: K. J. Bachmann, J. R. Beeler. Jr.. R. B. Benson, Jr.. H. Conrad, R. F. Davis, A. A. Fahmy. J. J. Hren. C. C. Koch. 
K. L. Moazed. K. L. Murty. J. Narayan, H. Palmour III, G. A. Razgonyi. R. 0. Scattergood, H. H. Stadelmaier; Research 
Professor: F. Shimura: Visiting Professors: D. Maher, D. M. Preiss; Adjunct Professors: B. R. Appleton, Y. Chen. C. R. 
Manning. Jr.. G. Mayer. G. McGurie. J. Prater. J. Routbort; Pro/e.s.sor.s fi'mmh; W. W. Austin. J. K. Magor. R. F. Stoops; 
As.'iociate Professors: C. M. Balik. N. El-Masry. A. I. Kingon. P. E. Russell: Research Associate Professor: i. Kasichai- 
nula: Visiting Associate Professor: i. C. Russ; Adjunct Associate Professors: 0. H. Auciello. I. Turlik: As.sociate Professor 
Emeritu.s:}.H&mme: Assistant Professor: J. T.G\ass: Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. Posthi\\:L€cturers:R.L.Port£T, a. 

187 



A West- Research Associates D. P. Griffis. T, M. Hare. Z. Radzimski; Associate Members of the Faculty: J, A. Bailey 
(Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering), K. S. Havner (Civil Engineering), Y. Horie (Civil Engineering), G. Lucovsky 
(Physics), R. J. Nemanich (Physics), A. Reisman (Electrical and Computer Engineering). V. T. Stannett (Chemical 
Engineering). 

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering offers programs to qualify grad- 
uates for positions in industry, educational institutions, and governmental agencies involv- 
ing design, development, selection, and processing of engineering materials. Typical of the 
industries served by graduates in materials engineering are: aerospace, chemical, electri- 
cal, electronics, construction, manufacturing, materials processing, nuclear, and transpor- 
tation. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The continuing industrial and technological growth of the Southeast in general and of the 
State of North Carolina in particular has been marked by a particularly strong demand for 
materials scientists and engineers. New materials and novel processing and/or fabrication 
methods are required by a large fraction of modern technology. Therefore, professional 
training in materials science and engineering provides career opportunities in a wide 
variety of industries from those which produce and/or use metals and glass or ceramics to 
microelectronic devices and plastics. These opportunities include careers in research and 
development of new materials and processes for producing them, failure analysis, product 
design and reliability, and technical management. 

CURRICULUM IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

The materials engineer must be able to deal with a wide range of phenomena that occur in 
metals, ceramics and polymers. The undergraduate curriculum is designed as a balanced 
program, treating the scientific and engineering principles applicable to all classes of 
materials, along with particular engineering and design concepts unique to each class of 
material. Further emphasis in a specialty area is provided by choosing from a recom- 
mended set of technical electives (9 credits) in ceramics, metals, polymers or microelec- 
tronic materials. The remaining required courses are distributed among mathematics, 
physical sciences, and the humanities and social sciences. The material science and engi- 
neering program, which is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET), leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Materials Science and 
Engineering. 

A fifth year professional program is available for advanced study and further speciali- 
zation. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Creditx Spriiig Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Chem. Principles & Appl. or 

E 100 Introduction to COE CSC 110-112 Intro, to Computing 4-3 

E115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

MA 141 AnalyticGeometry &Calc. I 4 FY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 Physical Education Elective 1 



15-16 



Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semeste" Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 110/112 Intro. Comp.-FORTRAN/ ECE 331 Prin. Electrical Engr. I 3 

Pascal or MA 341 Appl. Differential Eqns. I 3 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 3-4 MAE 206 Engineering Statics 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MAT .301 Equil. & Rate Processes 3 

MAT 201 Struct. & Prop. Engr. Mat'ls 3 Humanities/Social Science Electives 6 

MAT 210 Expr. in Mafls. Engr 1 7^ 

PY 208 Physics for Sci. & Engrs. II 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16-17 



188 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Se7nester 



Credits 



Spring Semexter 



Credits 



MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 3 

MAT 324 Polymer Char. Lab 1 

MAT 325 Intro. Polymer Mat 4 

MAT 330 Prin. Mat'ls. I 3 

MAT 410 Comp. Appl. Met. Engr 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

17 



MAT 321 Phase Transf. & Diff 3 

MAT 331 Prin. Mat'ls. II 3 

MAT 434 Ceramic Engr. Lab 1 

MAT 435 Physical Ceramics I 3 

MAT 450 Mech. Prop. Mat 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



MAT 332 Prin. Mat'ls. Ill 3 

MAT 423 Mat. Factors in Design 3 

MAT 430 Phys. Met. Lab 1 

MAT 431 Physical Metal. I 4 

MAT 491 Mat'ls. Engr. Seminar (1) 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

MAT Technical Elective- 3 

17(18) 



Spring Semester Credits 

MAT 424 Senior Design Project 3 

MAT 491 Mat'ls. Engr. Seminar 1 

MAT 491 Mat'ls. Engr. Seminar (1) 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

MAT Technical Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 

16(15) 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 134 



'MAT Technical Electives to be selected from the specialty area courses listed. 
2MAT 491 Seminar may be taken either semester. 

SPECIALTY AREAS 

Six credits of technical electives are required. If a specialty area is chosen, one of the following sequences of technical 
electives is recommended. Other technical elective sequences may be selected with departmental approval. 



Ceramic Materials 

MAT 311— Ceramic Processing 1 3 

MAT417— Ceramic Engineering Design 3 

MAT 436— Physical Ceramics II 3 

Metallic Materials 

MAT 432— Physical Metallurgy II 3 

MAT 440— Proc. Metallic Mat'ls 3 



Polymeric Materials 
MAT 490A— Polymeric Materials Engineering . . 3 
MAT 490B— Polymer Processing 3 

Electronic Materials 
ECE 441— Introduction to Solid-State Devices ... 3 

MAT 460— Electronic Materials 3 

MAT 495B— Elect. Mat'ls. Lab 1 



MINOR IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

The minor in Materials Science and Engineering is designed to provide students with the 
fundamentals necessary for advanced study in materials science and engineering and/or 
employment in materials related fields. The Materials Science and Engineering minor 
offers a structured program that allows students in disciplines other than Materials to 
become familiar with the common features of all materials and to gain a deeper knowledge 
of at least one subdiscipline within the materials field. This knowledge will help many 
students in their careers in industry or graduate school. Requirements for the minor 
include a minimum of 16 credit hours consisting of ten hours of specified MAT courses and 
6-7 hours of additional courses. The GPA for the minor courses must be at least 2.0. 



189 



MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE 
ENGINEERING 

Brougrhton Hall (Room 3211) 

Professor J. A. Bailey, Head of Department 

Professor J. A. Edwards. Associate Head of Department for Mechanical Engineering 

Program 
Professor J. N.Perkins, Associate Head of Department for Aerospace Engimering Program 

Professor J. C. Mulligan, Graduate Administrator 

Lecturer A. S. Boyers. Undergraduate Administrator 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: E. M. Afify, M. A. Boles, R. R. Johnson 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professors: M. N. Ozisik, F. R. DeJarnette 

R. J. Reynolds Industries Professors: W. C. Griffith, C. F. Zorowski 

Pro/esnors: E. M. Afify, J. A. Bailey. F. R. DeJarnette. T. A. Dow. J. A. Edwards. F. D. Hart. H. A. Hassan. T. H. Hodgson, 
E. G. Humphries. G. K. F. Lee. C.J. Maday. J. C. Mulligan. M. N. Ozisik. J. N. Perkins. L. H. Royster. F. 0. Smetana. F. 
Y. Sorrell. J. S. Strenkowski. C. F. Zorowski: Adjunct Professors:}. M. Bounds. R. L. Bradow. C. T. Crowe. G. Horvay. J. 
N. Juang. D. E. Klett, E. R. McClure. G. D. Walberg. R. A. Whisnant: Visiting Professor and Extension Specialist: M. M. 
Fikry; Professors Emeriti: R. A. Burton. M. H. Clayton. B. H. Garcia. Jr.. W. C. Griffith. F. J. Hale. J. K. Whitfield. J. 
Woodburn: Associate Professors: M. A. Boles. J. W. David. A. C. Eberhardt. R. R. Johnson. R. F. Keltie. C. Kleinstreur. 
J. N. Leach. D. S. McRae. R. T. Nagel. L. M. Silverberg. S. Torquato: Associate Professor and Extension Specialist: H. 
M. Eckerlin: Adjunct Associate Professors: J. P. Archie. R. N. Armstrong. R. W. Barnwell. J. F. Campbell. P. B. Carson, 
D L Dwover. R. M. Hall. J. H. Hebrank. K. R. Iver. D. W. Lee, D. L. Margolis. R. M. Potter. M. J. Ruiz. H. Singh. J. S. 
Stewart: Assistant Professors: G. V. Candler. N. Chokani. J. W. Eischen. C. E. Hall. R. D. Gould. E. C. Klang. P. L Ro. C. 
E. Spiekermann. F. G. Yn&n: Adjunct Assistant Professors: M. M. Cohen. D. P.Colvin. J. P. Coulter. J. U.Crowder. J. A. 
Daggerhart. P. A. Gnoffo. A. L. Patra. T. W. Sigmon. M. E. Tauber. M. A. Ward. W. J. Yanta: Lecturers: G. 0. Batton. A. 
S. Boyers. R. J. Leuba. G. M. Moorefield. R. J. Vess: Visiting Instnwtor: T. H. Brown: Adjunct Instructors: H. G. 
Hoomani. D. W. Lindley: Interiyistitutional Adjuncts: P. H. DeHoff. K. M. Whatley. 

Mechanical engineering comprises a wide range of activities including research; design 
and development: testing and experimentation; production implementation; manufactur- 
ing; operations; engineering sales and service; and management of engineering systems, 
subsystems and components. The diverse areas to which mechanical engineers contribute 
include transportation, power generation, energy conversion, environmental control, pollu- 
tion abatement, manufacturing, and noise control. A recent trend in one phase of mechani- 
cal engineering has been increased interest in the areas of robotics, precision engineering, 
and automated manufacturing systems. 

The employment demand for graduates in mechanical engineering typically exceeds the 
supply and is among the highest of the various engineering departments. 

Aerospace engineering has grown out of the challenge of the design, construction, and 
operation of vehicles that move or travel above the earth's surface. These vehicles range 
from ground-effect machines and helicopters to aircraft, rockets, and spacecraft. The 
design of these vehicles is difficult not only because they must be lightweight but also 
because they must operate reliably and efficiently in a harsh environment. Moreover, the 
design requirements for spacecraft and high performance transport aircraft also apply to 
the next generation of ground transportation systems such as high speed trains, over-water 
transport, and automated motor vehicles. 

Most graduates in aerospace engineering prefer to seek employment in the aerospace 
industry, however, they are broadly qualified for a variety of kinds of practice. Every major 
class of thermal and mechanical system is included in aerospace vehicles. The aerospace 
industry is one of the largest employers of engineers in the United States. Career and 
employment opportunities are available in the areas of arodynamics, propulsion, struc- 
tures, structural dynamics, and stability and control in both commercial and private 
aviation, and in related aerospace industries. 



190 



FACILITIES 

Laboratx)ries include research facilities in acoustics, automotive engine pollution and 
performance, computer-aided-design and computer graphics, the effect of shock loading on 
materials, machine tool wear and mechanics, applied energy systems including a complete 
solar house, precision engineering, and boundary layers on airfoils. 

Undergraduate laboratories exist for the following courses and activities: mechanical 
engineering measurements, performance evaluation of mechanical engineering systems, 
senior projects in machine and system design, senior projects in aerospace vehicle design, 
and subsonic and supersonic wind tunnel testing and data analysis. In addition there are 
graduate laboratories in experimental stress analysis and photoelasticity. Further, the 
department has a complete machine shop and electronics and instrumentation shop and 
related technicians. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The flexibility and breadth of the mechanical engineering curriculum culminates in a 
broad range of employment opportunities in machinery and power related applications the 
world over. Mechanical engineers work at the heart of development of computer controlled 
devices, vehicles and production machinery. They are well qualified for employment in 
production or product planning and for industrial management. Many go into research and 
development after graduate study. 

The aerospace engineers prefer the aerospace industry, but are broadly qualified for a 
variety of kinds of practice. Every major class of thermal and mechanical system is 
included in aerospace vehicles. The aerospace industry is one of the largest employers of 
engineers in the United States. Career and employment opportunities are available in the 
areas of aerodynamics, propulsion, structures and stability and control in both commercial 
and private aviation and in related aerospace industries. 

CURRICULA 

Because of the close relationship between mechanical and aerospace engineering, both 
curricula are administered by one department. There is cooperation between the two 
disciplines in which responsibility for subject areas such as thermodynamics, heat and 
mass transfer, vibrations, acoustics, fluid mechanics, propulsion and control theory is 
shared. 

Each program is designed to provide the student with an understanding of both the 
science on which the discipline is founded and the applied science and technology which 
characterizes its specific character. In addition the programs provide the student with an 
opportunity to develop the skills for applying his or her acquired knowledge. The aerospace 
engineering and the mechanical engineering programs, which are accredited by the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), lead to the degrees Bache- 
lor of Science in Aerospace Engineering, and Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, respectively. Graduate degrees are also offered (see listing of graduate degrees offered 
and consult the Graduate Catalog). 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CSC 112 Intro, to Comp.-FORTRAN 3 

E 100 Introduction to COE ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

E 115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

MA 141 Anablic Geometry & Calc. I 4 Physical Education Elective 1 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

16 



15 



191 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



FaU Semater Credits 

GC 101 Enpneerinif Graphics 2 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

MAE 206 Enirineerinjr Sutics 3 

PY 208 Physics for Scientists & Engineers H 4 

Humanities/ Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective • 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

MA 302 Num. Appl. to Diff. Eq 1 

MA 341 Appl. Diff. Equations I 3 

MAE 208 Engr. Dynamics^ 3 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 3 

MAT 201 Struct. & Prop, of Engr. Matr 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



FaU Semester Credits 

ECE 331 Prin. of Elec. Engr. I 3 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermo I' 3 

MAE305 Mech. Engr. Lab I 1 

MAE 315 Dynamics of Machines 3 

MAE 316 Strength of Mech. Comp 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

IE 311 Engr. Economic Analysis 3 

MAE 302 Engr. Thermo II 3 

MAE 306 Mech. Engr. Lab II 1 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

MAE 310 Conduct. & Radia. Heat Transfer 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 



Fall Semester 

MAE 405 Mech. Engr. Lab III 1 

MAE 410 Conv. Heat Trans. Fluid Flow 3 

MAE 415 Mech. Engr. Analysis 3 

MAE 435 Prin. of Auto. Controls 3 

Free Electives 6 

16 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 

MAE 412 Energy Systems 3 

MAE 416 Mechanical Engr. Design 4 

Departmental Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 133* 



Students may elect to take PY 201. 202 and 203 in place of PY 205. 208. Rearrangement of the schedule of courses to 
accomplish this will be worked out in consultation with the student's adviser. 



'See information concerning the humanities, social science sequence for College of Engineering. 

^A grade of C or better is required in MAE 208 before taking MAE 315. 

>A grade of C or better is required in MAE 301 before taking MAE 302 and MAE 310. 

'A 2.0 in the major GPA and the overall GPA are required for graduation. 

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

E 100 Introduction to COE 

E 115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 105 Chem. Principles & Appl 3 

ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 

15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



FaU Semester Credits 

CSC 112 Intro, to Computing-FORTRAN 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

MAE 206 Engr. Statics 3 

PY208 Physics for Scientists & Engineers II 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective* 1 

Is 



Spring Semester Credits 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics 2 

MA 341 Appl. Diff. Equations I 3 

MAE 208 Engineering Dynamics 3 

MAE 261 Aero. Vehicle Performance 3 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics 3 

MAT 201 Struct, of Engr. Mat 3 

Physical Education Elective* 1 

li 



192 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ECE 331 Prin. of Elec. Engr 3 MAE 356 Aerodynamics II 3 

ECE339 Prin. of Elec. EngT. Lab 1 MAE 358 Aerodynamics II Lab 1 

MAE 301 EngT. Thermodynamics P 3 MAE 365 Propulsion I 3 

MAE 355 Aerodynamics I 3 MAE 435 Principles of Automatic Control 3 

MAE 357 Aerodynamics I Lab 1 MAE 472 Aero. Vehicle Struct. II 3 

MAE 371 Aero. Vehicle Struct. I 3 MAE 473 Aero. Vehicle Struct. II Lab 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

17 17 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MAE 455 Boundary Layer Theory 3 MAE 479 Aero. Vehicle DesigTi II 3 

MAE 462 Flight Veh. Stab. & Con 3 Departmental Elective' 3 

MAE 465 Propulsion II 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

MAE 466 Propulsion II Lab 1 Free Electives' 6 



15 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 134^ 



MAE 478 Aero. Vehicle Design I 2 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Free Elective' 3 

li 

'See information concerning the humanities/social science sequence for the College of Engineering. 
'A GPA of 2.0 or better is required for both (a) all courses taken at NCSU and (b) for all MAE courses. 
^C Minimum in MAE 301 is required before enrolling in MAE 356 and MAE 525. 

'Departmental electives are MAE 452. MAE 453, MAE 456, MAE 525. and MAE 526, Other courses may be approved by 
AE adviser, 
'To be counted towards graduation, only free elective and PE courses may be taken credit-only. 



NUCLEAR ENGINEERING 

Burlington Engineering Laboratxjries (Room 1110-B) 
Professor D. L. Dudziak, Head of the Department 
Professor R. P. Gardner, Coordinator of Advising 
Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: K. Verghese 

Professors: D, L, Dudziak, R. P. Gardner. J, G. Gilligan. K, L. Murty, P. J. Turinsky, K, Verghese, B. W. Wehring; 
Professors Emeriti: R. L. Murray. R. F. Saxe, E, Stam, L, R, Zumwalt; Associate Professor: J, M. Doster: Assistant 
Professors: D. Bullen, 0, E. Hankins: Lecturer and Health Physicist: K, V. Mani; Associate Director of Nuclear Reactor 
Program: G. D. Miller; Nuclear Sen-ices Manager: J. N. Weaver. 

Nuclear engineering is concerned with the engineering aspects of the control, release and 
utilization of nuclear energy from both fission and fusion. Nuclear reactors serve many 
functions — they serve as heat sources for electric power plants, are the basis of modern 
propulsion systems for ships and submarines, and produce fissionable and radioactive 
isotopes for a variety of peaceful applications. Nuclear methods are applied in medical 
diagnosis and treatment, scientific research, and the search for new resources. The nuclear 
engineering program educates individuals in scientific and engineering principles essen- 
tial for effective and productive contributions in industrial, university and government 
service. 

The Nuclear Engineering Program, which is accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Nuclear 
Engineering. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Nuclear power reactor construction continues with over one hundred reactors now 
operating in the nation, increasing our reliance upon nuclear energy as a substitute for 
energy from fossil fuels. Development of breeder and fusion reactors offers the potential of 



193 



vast new energy sources. Industrial and medical applications of radiation continue to 
increase in diverse industries. A demand for nuclear engineers exists within the electric 
power industry and national laboratories. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

Several special scholarships exist for NCSU nuclear engineering students, including the 
Bechtel, Carolina Power and Light, Ebasco, Eastern Carolinas ANS, Institute for Nuclear 
Power Operations, and American Nuclear Society scholarships. A special department fund 
supports scholarships for incoming freshmen. NCSU nuclear engineering students have 
gained national recognition by several times receiving the Student Design Award of the 
American Nuclear Society and being recipients of nationally awarded fellowships. 

FACILITIES 

Facilities for nuclear education include: a nuclear research reactor (PULSTAR), which 
can be operated at a steady state power of 1 MW; the Scaled Pressurized Water Reactor 
facility (SPWR), an operating 1/9 scale model of a nuclear power plant; radiation detectors 
and multi-channel analyzers; nuclear materials laboratory; thermal hydraulic laboratory; 
prompt gamma facility; neutron radiography unit; numerous computer facilities including 
graphic terminals, access to the NCSU IBM 3090 supercomputer and the North Carolina 
Supercomputing Center CRAY Y-MP, an Alliant FX/4 parallel mini supercomputer, VAX 
11/750 minicomputer, several engineering workstations, and numerous microcomputers 
(PCs); fusion laboratory; neutron activation analysis laboratory, and high-and low-level 
radiochemistry laboratories. 

CURRICULUM 

Nuclear engineers work in nuclear systems research, design, development, testing, 
operation, environmental protection, and marketing. The Bachelor of Science program 
prepares graduates for positions in industry, government laboratories or for graduate 
study (see listing of graduate degrees offered). The curriculum incorporates basic sciences 
and engineering, with emphasis on mathematics and physics, followed by coursework in 
nuclear science and technology. Attention is given to the engineering design of nuclear 
reactors and nuclear radiation systems and to energy resources and environmental aspects 
of nuclear energy. Computers are widely used through the curriculum. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

E 100 IntroductionloCOE ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

E 115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 Physical Education Elective 1 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 



16 



16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 112 Intro, to Comp.-FORTRAN 3 CE 213 Introduction to Mechanics 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry and Calc. Ill 4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations I 3 

NE201 Intro, to Nuclear Engineering 2 NE 202 Fundamentals of Nuclear Energy 4 

PY 208 Physics for Scientists & Engineers II 4 PY 407 Intro. Mod. Physics 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

1? 17 



194 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spruig Semester Credits 

ECE331 Principles of Electrical Engr 3 MA 401 Applied Diff. Equations II 3 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 3 NE 302 Nucl. Reactor Energy Conversion 4 

MAE 308 Fluid Mechanics I 3 NE 401 Reactor Analysis and Design 4 

NE301 Funda. of Nuclear Engr 4 MAT 201 Struct. Prop, of Engr. Mat'ls 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

16 17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

NE 402 Reactor Engineering 4 NE 403 Nuclear Engr. Design Proj 3 

NE 404 Radiol. Reactor & Environ. Safety 3 NE 409 Nuclear Materials 2 

NE 405 Reactor Systems 3 Approved Technical Elective' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 Approved NE Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

T7 Free Elective 3 

17 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 132 

'Courses must be taken from the departmental list of approved courses. 



TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

(Also see College of Textiles) 
Nelson Textile Building (Room 126) 

Professor C. D. Livengood, Head of the Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and 

Science 

Professor B. S. Gupta, Assistant Head 
Professor G. N. Mock, Program Director 
(For a list of faculty, see Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science) 

The textile industry are rapidly changing to become a capital intensive, high-technology 
industry. Applications of computers and robotics are commonplace in the modern plant. 
Textile engineering is concerned with the application of scientific principles and engineer- 
ing practice to the design and control of all aspects of fiber, textile and apparel processes, 
products and machinery. These include natural and man-made fibers, composites, safety 
and health, pollution control and energy conservation and management. 

Modern textiles are crucial major components of emerging developments in the medical, 
space, aeronautical and communications fields. Artificial kidneys, bones, hearts and arter- 
ies, rocket shields, space shuttle nose cones and insulation, space suits, composite airplane 
bodies— all involve the use of textile fibers and fabrics to produce engineered structures. 
Structural- and geo-textiles are used in a large number of applications, such as water 
desalination, stadium roofs, air supported buildings, reservoir liners, road beds and 
composites. 

The Textile Engineering program, which is accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET), leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Textile 
Engineering. 

FACILITIES AND SCHOLARSHIPS 

(See College of Textiles) 



195 



OPPORTUNITIES 

Because the modern production and utilization of textile materials requires young people 
highly competent in the areas of engineering, mathematics, science and technology, gradu- 
ates of the program are prepared for challenging careers in the primary textile, man-made 
fiber, apparel and nonwovens industries, as well as the textile machinery, automotive, 
aerospace and construction industries. Opportunities abound in plant engineering, design 
engineering, production control, process engineering, product development, microelec- 
tronics, robotics and automation. 

TEXTILE ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

The Textile Engineering program investigates how scientific principles and engineering 
practices can be applied to the diverse requirements of textile materials, processes, struc- 
tures and machinery. The program combines study of textile, physical, mathematical and 
social sciences with engineering analysis and design techniques. Students study the inter- 
action of fibers and fabrics with machinery, as well as consider such issues as safety and 
health, pollution control, and energy management. Completion of a B.S. in Textile Engi- 
neering provides the individual with a broad engineering background suited to addressing 
textile engineering problems. 

Since training in textile engineering involves two distinct technical fields— textiles and 
engineering— the curriculum is a joint responsibility of the two colleges and is so 
administered. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fait Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

E 100 Introduction to COE 

E 115 Intro, to Computing Envir 1 

ENGlll Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

FE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 112 Intro, to Comp.-FORTRAN 3 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Scient. I 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 

15 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics 2 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

MAE 206 Engineering Statics or 

CE 214 Engineering Mechanics— Statics 3 

PY 208 General Physics II 4 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



SpriTig Semester Credits 

MA 341 Applied Differential Equations 3 

MAE 208 Engineering Dynamics or 

CE 215 Engr. Mechanics— Dynamics 3 

MAE 314 Solid Mechanics or 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids 3 

ST 361 Intro, to Statistics for Engr 3 

TE 201 Polymer & Fiber Sci. & Engr 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

l9 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ECE 331 Prin. of Electrical Engr. I 3 

MAE 301 Engr. Thermodynamics I 3 

MAE .308 Fluid Mechanics I 3 

TE 301 Textile Manuf. Process I 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

ECE 332 Prin. of Electrical Engr. II or 

MAE 435 Prin. of Auto Controls 3 

ENG 331 Commun. Engr. & Tech. Info 3 

TAM 380 Mgmt. & Cont. of Textile Sys 3 

TE 302 Textile Manuf. Process II 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective 3 

l9 



196 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TE 303 Textile Chemical Processes 4 TE 402 Textile Engineering Design II 4 

TE 401 Textile Engineering Design I 4 TE 404 Textile Process Quality Control 4 

TE 403 Mechanics of Fibrous Structures 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Engineering Elective- 3 Free Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 "TT 

17 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 134 

NOTE: All courses taken to satisfy the humanities/social science requirement must be taken from the College of 

Engineering approved list. 
'EB 201 should be taken prior to the spring semester of the junior year. 
2CHE 311, IE 311, ECE 305, ECE 332, MAE 302, MAE 315, MAE 435, or MAT 201. 



PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 

The College of Engineering offers professional curricula leading to the degrees of Chemi- 
cal Engineer, Civil Engineer, Electrical Engineer, Industrial Engineer, Materials Engi- 
neer, Mechanical Engineer, and Nuclear Engineer. This program is designed for engineer- 
ing students holding baccalaureate degrees who find that an additional year of education is 
desirable, for practicing engineers who desire to take a year of professional work to update 
their training, and for students holding physical sciences or mathematics degrees who seek 
a professional level of education in engineering. The program is intended to be sufficiently 
flexible to meet a wide variety of student needs, and to emphasize professional course work. 
The curriculum consists of a minimum of 30 hours of credit at the 400 level or above, 
including at least 15 hours of credit at the 500 level or above. 

Applicants who hold the bachelor's degree in engineering, physical sciences, or mathe- 
matics may be admitted to the professional program of the College of Engineering upon 
application and presentation of official credentials. For unconditional admission, these 
credentials must show a minimum grade point average of 2.5 overall. Admission on a 
provisional basis may be granted to applicants who do not meet the formal requirements. In 
the case of insufficient preparation, prerequisite courses will be prescribed in addition to 
the normal fifth-year requirements. 

The following requirements of the College of Engineering will be observed: 

1. Professional degree students are admitted through the Undergraduate Admissions 
Office as fifth-year professional degree (PR) students. They are subject to rules and 
regulations as established and administered by the Dean of the College of Engi- 
neering. 

2. Application forms for admission to the professional degree program should be com- 
pleted and submitted to the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs at least 60 days in 
advance of the semester in which admission is sought. Acceptance of a student for the 
professional program is based on the recommendation of his department and the 
approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. At the time of acceptance, N.C. 
State University students may transfer a limited number of excess credits to their 
professional program. 

3. A limited amount of credit to be applied toward the requirements for the professional 
degree may be transferred to N.C. State University from recognized institutions 
offering advanced work in engineering and related fields. Such a transfer of credit 
must be approved by the department in which the student does his or her major work 
and by the Dean of the College of Engineering. 

4. A graduate in one field of engineering may choose to work for a professional degree in 
another field provided he or she has the permission of the department. The student will 
be expected to take necessary prerequisite courses in addition to those required for the 
professional degree program. 



197 



6. 



10 



11 



12. 



5. Each fifth-year student will be assigned to an advisor in the sponsoring department. 
The function of the advisor is to assist the student in preparing a program of study and 
to counsel the student with regard to his or her academic work. Prior to the midterm of 
the first semester, the student and his or her advisor should agree on a program of 
study for the professional degree. Program of Study for Professional Degree forms 
will be prepared and submitted to the office of the Assistant Dean for Academic 
Affairs as well as to the department. Upon approval of the Office of the Dean, this 
becomes the student's degree program. 

Grades for each completed course are reported to the Dean of the College of Engineer- 
ing and to the Office of Registration. A minimum grade of "C" must be made in each 
course to obtain credit. A quality point average of 2.5 in all course work must be 
maintained to satisfy requirements for a professional degree. 

All courses taken by the student after admission to the professional program will count 
toward the overall grade point average even though an individual course may not be a 
part of the degree program. 

A student who falls below 2.5 average will be placed on probation and given one 
semester to raise the overall average up to a 2.5. If the student has been admitted on a 
provisional basis, he or she must make a 2.5 average the first semester in order to 
continue. 

Work completed more than six years prior to the date on which the professional degree 
is to be granted may not be used as credit toward the professional degree, unless 
approved by the head of the department concerned and the Assistant Dean for Aca- 
demic Affairs. 

A professional degree student who has been admitted to the Graduate School may, 
with the approval of a Master's Degree committee and the Graduate School, transfer 
nine hours of credit for courses in which a grade of B or higher was received. 
A student may transfer only once; that is, from the Professional Degree Program to the 
Graduate School or from the Graduate School to the Professional Degree Program. 
Therefore, a student is not permitted to return to either program after having trans- 
ferred from that degree program. 

It is intended that professional degree students will complete a substantial portion of 
credit hours toward the degree while in residence on the NCSU campus. 



8 



COLLEGE OF FOREST 
RESOURCES 



Biltmore Hall (Room 2028) 

L. W. Tombaugh. Dean 

E. B. Cowling, Associate Dean for Research 

J. D. Wellman, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Coordinator of Advising 

J. P. Abbott. Forest Resources Librarian 

The management and utilization of the South's forest resources and products provide 
opportunities for challenging professional careers. Forests provide a variety of goods- 
timber, water, wildlife and recreation environments — vital to the economy and well being 
of North Carolina. Graduates of the college are qualified for professional positions manag- 
ing forest lands, or producing the products or managing the services developed from these 
lands. Emphasis is placed on natural renewable resource management because the wise use 
of the products and amenities that can be derived from forest lands is central to preserving 
environmental quality and the quality of life. 

North Carolina is an important forest state. Its 19 million acres of commercial forest land, 
comprising two-thirds of the state's land area, form the base for goods and services valued 
at over ten billion dollars annually. Nearly 20 percent of the state's industrial labor force is 
associated with forest based organizations: forests support the southern region's largest 
industry. New wood-using industries continue to move into the South, creating multi- 
billion dollar outputs. Similarly, recreational activities continue to expand as a result of 
growing population, affluence, mobility and leisure time. 

As a result of this growth, forest based industries and governmental agencies need 
well-educated, technically competent personnel. 

Some of the programs in the College of Forest Resources are not duplicated in other 
southern universities, so the Trustees of the University and the Southern Regional Educa- 
tion Board have designated them as regional in nature. 

DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Five curricula are administered in the college through its Departments of Forestry, 
Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, and Wood and Paper Science. These pro- 
grams provide a broad education in the biological and physical sciences as well as a sound 
cultural and professional background. Students are prepared for careers in the fields of 
conservation, forestry, parks, recreation and tourism management, pulp and paper science 
and technolog>', and wood science and technology. 

Freshmen have a nearly common core of courses during the first semester allowing 
deferment of the final selection of a curriculum for two or three semesters. To assist 
students with a better understanding of their major area of study, introductory courses are 
given in each curriculum. 

Graduate degrees offered include: Master of Science, Master of Forestry, Master of 
Recreation Resources, Master of Wood and Paper Science, and the Doctor of Philosophy. 
Applicants should consult the Graduate Catalog for additional information about these 
programs. 

FIELD INSTRUCTION AND EXPERIENCE 

All students (except those in conservation ) are required to complete the equivalent of one 
or more of the following summer activities: (1) camp, (2) internship. (3) practicum, (4) work 
experience. 

199 



A summer camp which normally follows the sophomore year is required of all forestry 
students. 

Undergraduates enrolled in parks, recreation and tourism management, complete a 
nine-week internship immediately following the completion of the junior year. 

All pulp and paper majors spend at least one summer working in a pulp and paper mill 
designated by the school. 

Wood science and technology students attend a summer practicum following the sopho- 
more year. 

Additional field instruction and scheduled trips to representative industries and agen- 
cies are required frequently as a part of regular class assignments. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Students making exceptional academic records during their freshman and sophomore 
years may, with faculty approval, follow an honors program. Honors students develop more 
rigorous programs of study, frequently taking advanced courses in mathematics, chemis- 
try, statistics and economics. With the adviser's consent honors students may substitute 
preferred courses for normally required courses in order to develop strength in special 
interest areas. Honors students are required to undertake a program of independent study 
which can involve a research problem or special project during their junior or senior year, 
and they must participate in the senior honors seminar. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Academic scholarships (ranging from $1000 to $4,000) in several program areas are 
available for entering freshmen who have excelled in their high school academic and 
extracurricular endeavors. These awards include: ( 1) six renewable scholarships for enter- 
ing students in the forestry major, (2) six renewable scholarships for students enrolling in 
the wood science and technology curriculum, and (3) twenty-five awards, renewable for up 
to four years, for students majoring in pulp and paper science and technology. 

HONOR SOCIETIES 

The College of Forest Resources has two honors societies— Xi Sigma Pi (for all majors 
within the college) and Rho Phi Lambda (for recreation majors) — that promote and recog- 
nize academic excellence. Students completing a minimum of one year of study with high 
academic achievement are invited to become members of these societies. 

INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES 

Students are exposed to international dimensions of their programs in a variety of ways. 
Many faculty members regularly travel abroad and several are active in major projects in 
foreign countries, including an international cooperative research project concentrating on 
Central America and Mexico. In addition, a significant number of foreign students enroll in 
the college, including in recent years from as many as 21 different countries from all parts 
of the world. 

FOREST RESOURCES EXTENSION 

The Forest Resources Extension program, a part of the Agricultural Extension Service, 
is the largest program of its type in the United States. It serves landowners, industries and 
public agencies in the areas of forestry, recreation, wildlife and wood and paper. Its 
primary responsibility is promoting the application of new ideas developed through 
research and experience. 

In cooperation with the Division of Lifelong Learning, short courses are offered in a 
number of fields to provide industry and government employees an opportunity to keep 
abreast of modern developments in techniques and equipment. 



200 



FACILITIES AND LABORATORIES 

Most classrooms are housed in Biltmore Hall. Among special education facilities in 
Forest Resources are: 80,000 acres in forests including the Hofmann Forest on the coastal 
plain; the Hill. Schenck. Hope Valley and Goodwin Forests in the Piedmont; and the Slocum 
summer camp at the Hill Forest in Durham county. Specialized laboratories unique to 
universities are contained in the Hodges Wood Products Laboratory and the Reuben B. 
Robertson Pulp and Paper Laboratory. Equipment in the Hodges Laboratory includes 
computer controlled woodworking machinery, dry kilns, sawmill veneer lathe and numer- 
ous other items required to convert wood into products. The Robertson Laboratory is a 
50,000 sq. ft. facility which contains laboratories and modern pulping and papermaking 
equipment dedicated to teaching and research activities. Examples of equipment are 
secondary fiber recycling equipment, a thermo mechanical pulping unit, paper machine, 
process control equipment, paper testing laboratory, and pulping digesters. 



CONSERVATION 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences.) 

Associate Professor H. J. Kleiss, Major Adviser, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences 

Professor A. W. Cooper, Major Adviser, College of Forest Resources 

Problems resulting from the world's increasing population, rapid urbanization and 
industrialization, and environmental modifications affect our lives every day. Hazardous 
and radioactive waste, water and air quality degradation, the greenhouse effect, world food 
and energy supplies, destruction of tropical forests— all are symptomatic of increasing 
pressures to produce more food, fiber, and energy and to raise living standards. Challenges 
posed by these issues require knowledgeable and dedicated people to make sound natural 
resource decisions. 

The Colleges of Forest Resources and Agriculture and Life Sciences, with strong pro- 
grams in the natural sciences, jointly offer a baccalaureate program in conservation. 
Graduates from this program are prepared for careers in land use management, laboratory 
technology, soil and water conservation, and/or environmental education. 

CURRICULUM IN CONSERVATION 

Students may enroll in either Forest Resources or Agriculture and Life Sciences, depend- 
ing on their primary area of interest in conservation. The freshman common core of courses 
for either school is acceptable. All students take a prescribed core of subjects in conserva- 
tion plus specified courses in one of five concentrations: soil conservation; environmental 
technology; environmental education; natural resource management and administration; 
communications. A dual degree program involving the conservation curriculum with 
another curriculum, e.g., science education, pest management, recreation, soil science, 
forestry is very feasible and recommended. 

Language (12 Credits) 

COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

ENG 3.33 Commun. for Sci. & Res 3 

Social Sciences and Humanities 
(21 Credits) 

EB 212 Econ. of Agriculture 3 

PS 201 Intro, to American Government 3 

Literature Elective 3 

Electives 12 



201 



Physical and Biological Sciences 
(28 Credits) 

BS 100 General Biology or 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 11 1 Precalculus Alfrebra and Trig 3 

MA 121 Introduction to Calculus 4 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

ZO 201 General Zoology or 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Physical Education and Free Electives 
(13 Credits) 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

Physical Education 3 

Free Electives ^ 

Departmental Requirements and 
Electives (56 Credits) 

BO<ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology 3 

BO<ZO) 365 Ecolog>' Laboratory 1 

FOR 252 Fundamentals of Forest Management 3 

FOR 401 Watershed Management 4 

FOR 472 Renewable Resource Management 4 

M EA 1 10 Geology I Lab 1 

MEA 120 Elements of Physical Geology 2 

RRA 241 Natural Resource Recreation 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

ZO(FW) 221 Conservation of Natural Resources 3 

ZO(RW) 353 Wildlife Management or 

ZO(FW) 420 Fishery Science 3 

Biological Sciences Electives 6 

Conservation Electives 16 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 131 

SOIL CONSERVATION CONCENTRATION 

PM 1 1 1 Integrated Pest Management 1 

SSC(BAE) 323 Water Management 4 

SSC 361 Soil Resources and Land Use 3 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 4 

SSC 461 Soil Physical Properties Plant Growth 3 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science 1 

16 
ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION' 

BAE(CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management^ 3 

FS 405 Food Microbiology 3 

SSC 361 Soil Resources & Land Use 3 

SSC 452 Soil Classification 4 

ZO 419 Limnology 3 

'MB 401, Microbiology, is required biological sciences elective. 
^or BAE(SSC) 323 Water Management 

NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION CONCENTRATION' 

EB 307 Business Law I 3 

EB 410 Public Finance 3 

EB 4.36 Environmental Economics 3 

FOR 491 Special Topics Forestry & Rel. Natural Resources or 
PS 491 Internship in Political Science or 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science 1-6 

MEA 200 Introduction to Marine Environment 3 

PS 312 Introduction to Public Administration 3 

16-21 

'PS 202. State and Local Government and EB 301. Intermediate Microeconomics, are required social science electives. 



202 



ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CONCENTRATION* 

ED 203 Introduction to Teaching Mathematics & Science 3 

ED 296D Special Topics in Science Edu 1 

ED 475 Methods of Teaching Science 3 

Electives 9 

16 

••PHIiED) 304. Philosophy of Education, is a required elective. 

COMMUNICATIONS CONCENTRATION^ 

COM (SP) 112 Basic Principles of Interpersonal Communication 3 

COM (SP) 201 Persuasive Theory 3 

ENG 214 Copyediting 3 

ENG 215 Principles of News and Article Writing 3 

COM (SP) 298 Special Projects in Speech-Communication or 
FOR 491 Special Topics Forestry & Rel. Natural Resources or 

SSC 492 Senior Seminar in Soil Science 1 

Elective 3 

16 

*SOC 302, Mass Communications, is a required social science elective. 



FORESTRY 

Biltmore Hall (Room 2018) 

Professor Arthur W. Cooper, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor James D. Gregory, Assistant DepaHment Head for Undergraduate 
Programs 

Professor D. Lester HoUey, Graduate Administrator 

Distinguished University Professor: E. B. Cowling 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: R. R. Braham 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor and Carl Alwin Schenck Professor: C. B. Davey 

Edwin F. Conger Distinguished Professor Emeritus: B. J. Zobel 

Professors: D. A. Adams, F. E. Bridgwater (USES), S. W. Buol, A. W. Cooper, E. B. Cowling, C. B. Davey. P. D. Doerr, M. 
H. Farrier. E. C. Franklin. D. J. Frederick. L. F. Grand, A. E. Hassan, D. L. Holley, Jr.. W. T. Huxster. R. C. Kellison. S. 
Khorram. J. G. Laarman. R. A. Lancia. J. R. McGraw. G. Namkoong(USFS). R. L. Noble. R. R. Sederoff. A. G. Wollum; 
Adjunct Professors: G. L. DeBarr. G. F. Dutrow. J. D. Hair. N. E. Johnson. J. R. Jorgensen. A. Krochmal. D. A. 
MacKinnon. R. W. Stonecypher. W. E. Towell. C. G. Wells; Professors Emeriti: R. C. Bryant. W. L. Hafley, R. D. Hazel. 
W. M. Keller. W. D. Miller. T. 0. Perry. R. J. Preston. L. C. Saylor. F. E. Whitfield. B. J. Zobel; Associate Professors: R. C. 
Abt. H. L. Allen. Jr.. H. V. Amerson. R. R. Braham. R. I. Bruck. J. D. Gregory. L. H. Harkins, L. G. Jervis. J. B. Jett. R. 
Lea. J. P. Roise. R.J. Weir, J. N.Woodm&n-.Adjunct Associate Professors: W.J. Barton. D. L. Bramlett, R.G.Campbell. 
J. E. deSteiguer. R. G. Haight. C. B. Webb; Associate Professor Emeritus: E. M. Jones; Assistant Professors: A. R. 
Gillespie. E. J. Jones. S. E. McKeand, W. D. Smith. P. W. Somers. A. M. Stomp. L. Tolley-Henry; Adjunct Assistant 
Professors: L. J. Frampton. W. E. Ladrach, R. B. McCullough. G. A. Ruark, H. D. Smith, M. M. Schoeneberger. H. K. 
Steen; Instructors: J. L. Bettis. G. B. Blank; Adjunct Instructor: R. W. Slocum; Specialists: W. E. Gardner. R. A. 
Hamilton; Director of CAMCORE: W. S. Dvorak; Liaison Geneticist: J. R. Sprague; Research Associates: J. A. 
Brockhaus. D. O'Malley. R. Whetten; Research Assistants: T. J. Albaugh. H. M. Cheshire. S. R. Colbert. C. S. Furiness. 
D. W. Hazel. S. Horton. K. C, Joyner. E. M. Lunk. D. L. Mengel. J. E. Mudano. D. T. Tew. A. Tohmaz. R. A. Wilson; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: H. A. Devine (Recreation Resources). F. B. Hain (Entomology). L. E. Hinesley 
(Horticultural Science). D. E. Moreland (USDA-Crop Science). R. R. Perdue (Recreation Resources). R. A. Powell 
(Zoology). R. R. Rucker (Economics & Business). R. R. Wilkinson (Landscape Architecture). 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The undergraduate program of the Department of Forestry at NCSU prepares students 
for professional challenges, personal growth, and a lifetime of service as managers of 
renewable natural resources. The curricula are designed to produce well-educated forestry 
graduates who have the basic knowledge, skills, flexibility and attitude needed for success 
in a wide variety of forestry or forestry-related careers. 



203 



Graduates are in demand by state and federal land-managing agencies, by industrial 
concerns growing wood as raw material, by state forestry and agriculture extension 
services, by forestry related organizations such as nurseries and landscape management 
firms, and by urban natural resource management agencies. Some graduates, after acquir- 
ing professional forestry experience, are self-employed as consultants and as operators or 
owners of forestry-related businesses. 

CURRICULA 

The Bachelor of Science degree is offered with two concentrations: Forest Management 
and Forest Science. The Forest Management concentration provides the broad-based 
forestry education needed for direct employment into positions in a wide variety of forestry 
or forestry-related organizations. The Forest Science concentration is designed to provide 
more extensive study in math and science and is particularly advised for students who may 
be considering graduate study. The Forest Science concentration provides a basic forestry 
education while incorporating more elective credits, greater flexibility, and more oppor- 
tunity for specialization than the Forest Management concentration. 

Instruction and practice in communications skills (both writing and speaking) are inte- 
grated into core forestry courses throughout the curricula. An experienced English 
instructor works with the forestry faculty to provide instruction and to develop and evalu- 
ate writing and speaking assignments that address the particular communication skills 
needed by successful foresters. 

The use of computers is integrated into the curricula in a similar fashion. Introductory 
instruction in programming and the use of computers is provided in CFR 134. Practical 
assignments on the use of computers as a tool in forestry are integrated into the advanced 
forestry courses. 

SUMMER CAMP 

An intensive summer camp experience, with forestry field training in the Coastal Plain, 
Piedmont, and Mountain regions of North Carolina is required. The camp is based at the 
College's Hill Demonstration Forest with trips taken to other regions. Four-year students 
take summer camp after the sophomore year. In order to be eligible for summer camp a 
four-year student must (1) have made a C or better in ENG HI and 112, (2) have passed BS 
100 and MA 114 (or MA 242 or MA 231). and (3) have no more than one D in FOR 110 and 
212. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Programs have been arranged with other departments whereby students can obtain, in 
addition to the Bachelor of Science degree in forestry, a second Bachelor of Science degree 
in such areas as agricultural economics, conservation, entomology, recreation resources 
administration, wood science and technology, or fisheries and wildlife science. These joint 
programs usually require additional credits above the forestry electives and free elective 
credits. Depending upon ability, students may complete the degree requirement by carry- 
ing additional credits in their four-year program or by enrolling for an extra semester or 
equivalent summer session. 

FORESTRY CURRICULA 
Management Concentration^ 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BS 100 General Biology 4 CH 101 Gen. Chemistry I 4 

CFR 134 Computers in Nat. Resources 1 ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 MA 114 Intro. Finite Math. Applic." 3 

FOR 110 Introduction to Forestry 2 WPS 202 Wood Struct. Prop. I 3 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus'' 4 Humanities/Social Science Elective^-* 3 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness' 1 PE 253 Orienteering ^ 

li 17 

204 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

EB 212 Econ. Agric. (Soc. Sci. Elec.) 3 

FOR 212 Dendrology 4 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 



Spring SeTnester Credits 

BO 360 Introductory Ecology 3 

BO 365 EcologvLab 1 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16 



SUMMER CAMP- 
Crfrfrts 

FOR 204 Silviculture 2 

FOR 261 Forest Communities 2 

FOR 264 Forest Pest Mgmt 1 

FOR 265 Fire Management 1 

FOR 274 Mapping and Mensuration 4 

10 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ENT 301 Intro. For. Insects* 3 

FOR 303 For. Tree Physiology 3 

FOR 319 For. Economics 3 

Advised Electives^'* 2 

Humanities/Social Science Electives 6 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 304 Silviculture 4 

FOR 374 For. Inv. Or. Yield 3 

FOR 434 Mgmt. Dec. Mak. For. Wood Prod 3 

PP 318 Forestry Pathology* 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Free Elective^-* 3 

17 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

FOR 353 Air Photo Int 3 

FOR 405 Forest Management 4 

Advised Electives 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Elective^-e 3 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

FOR 406 For. Inv., Anly. & Plan 4 

FOR 472 Renew. Res. Pol. & Mgmt 4 

Advised Electives 3 

Free Electives 6 

17 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 141 

'All students entering the Forestry curriculum are required to take at least one Forestry course during each of their first 

three semesters and until the following four courses are passed: FOR 110. CFR 134. WPS 202. and FOR212.GradesofD 

or lower not accepted in ENG 112. FOR 274, 303. 304, 319, 374, 405, 406. 

^Students with appropriate math skills are encouraged to take the math sequence MA 141-241-242 or MA 131-231. 
^Fifteen credits of humanities/social science electives must come from approved list and include at least 6 credits of 

humanities and 3 credits of social science. 

^Eight credits of advised electives require approval of student's advisor. 
^Nine credits of free electives are chosen without restriction. 
^Student may change sequence of electives. if desired. 
'Tobeeligibleforsummercamp, the student must (1) have made a Cor better in ENG 111 and 112, (2) have passed BS 

100 and MA 114 (or MA 242 or MA 231), and (3) have no more than one D in FOR 110 and 212. 
*These courses may be scheduled in senior year if necessary to schedule desired electives. 

'PE 253 Orienteering must be taken in fall of the freshman or sophomore years. 

Science Concentration^ 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

BS 100 Gen. Biology 4 

CFR 134 Computers in Nat. Resources 1 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

FOR 1 10 Introduction to Forestry 2 

MA 141 Anly. Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness* 1 

Hm./Soc. Sci. Elective^-^ 3 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

EB 201 Econ. I or 

EB 212 Econ. Agri. (Soc. Sci. Elec.) 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 241 Anly. Geometry & Calc. II 4 

WPS 202 Wood Struct. Prop. I 3 

PE253 Orienteering 1 

Is 



205 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 Prin. of Chemistry 4 BO 360 Intro. Ecology 3 

FOR 212 Dendrologj' 4 BO 365 Ecology Lab. 1 

MA 242 Aniv. Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. II 4 

FY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 4 SSC 200 Soil Science 4 

Physical Education Elective* 1 ST 311 Intro. Statistics 3 



17 



Physical Education Elective 1 

16 

SUMMER CAMP« 

Credits 

FOR 204 Silviculture 2 

FOR 261 Forest Communities 2 

FOR 264 Forest Pest Mgmt 1 

FOR 265 Fire Management 1 

FOR 274 Mapping and Mensuration 4 

10 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fait Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENT301 Intro. For. Insects" 3 FOR 304 Silviculture 4 

FOR 303 For. Tree Physiology 3 FOR 374 For. Inv. Gr. Yield 3 

FOR 319 For. Economics 3 PP318 For. Pathology' 4 

Humanities/Social Science Electives^-* 6 Advised Elective^." 3 

— ■ Humanities/Social Science Electives 3 

15 — 

17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spriiig Semester Credits 

FOR 405 Forest Management 4 FOR 472 Renew. Res. Pol. & Man 4 

Advised Electives 6 Advised Electives 7 

Humanities/Social Science Electives 3 Free Electives 6 



Free Electives *•* 3 

16 



17 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 141 



'All students entering the Forestry curriculum are required to take at least one Forestry course during each of their first 

three semesters and until the following three courses are passed: FOR 110. CFR 134, WPS 202, and FOR 2 12. Grades of 

D or lower not accepted in ENG 112. FOR 274, 303, 304. 319. 374, 405. 406. 
^Fifteen credits of humanities/social science electives must come from approved list and include at least 6 credits of 

humanities and 3 credits of social science. 
'Thirteencreditsof technical electives are supporting courses chosen with approval of advisor. Freshmen who elect this 

curriculum shall be encouraged to develop a tentative program for use of electives. All students who elect this 

curriculum are re(iu ired to develop a program for use of electives prior to preregistration for fall semester, junior year. 
•Students may change sequence of electives, if desired. 
'Nine credits of free electives are chosen without restriction. 
*To be eligible for summer camp, the student must (1) have made a C or better in ENG 111 and 112, (2) have passed BS 

100 and MA 114 (or MA 242 or MA 231 ), and (3) have no more than one D in FOR 110 and 212. 
These courses may be scheduled in senior year if necessary to schedule desired electives. 

"PE 253 Orienteering must be taken in the fall of the freshman or sophomore year. 

FORESTRY CURRICULA FOR TRANSFER STUDENTS 

Students may transfer into one of the forestry concentrations after completing one or two 
years of study at another institution or in a different curriculum at NCSU. There are no 
minimum course or credit hour requirements which students must meet to transfer into the 
forestry program prior to summer camp. Transfer students follow one of three options: 

(1) Students who wish to enter a forestry curriculum at summer camp and complete a 
two year transfer program (summer camp plus 4 regular semesters) must meet the 
transfer credit requirements as outlined in the two year transfer curricula. 

(2) Students with less than 66 transfer credits (minimum of 55 but including 6 credits of 
English and the majority of the mathematics and science requirements) may be 
admitted for entry directly to summer camp. However, they should recognize that 
completion of the desired curriculum may require more than two years. 

(3) Students with less than 55 transfer credits will be enrolled at the point in the 
curriculum appropriate to the type and number of credits already completed. Time 
required for completion of the desired curriculum will depend on the number of 

206 



transfer credits accepted and the number and sequence of courses needed to complete 

the curriculum. 
Students who enroll at another institution with the intent of later transferring to a 
forestry curriculum at NCSU should take a program of courses that approximates as 
closely as possible the freshman and sophomore years of the desired forestry curriculum. 

TRANSFER CURRICULUM, MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION^ 

Transfer Credits^ 

Subject Credits 

Biology 4 

Chemistry 8 

English 6 

Introductory Economics 3 

Mathematics 7 

Physics 8 

Physical Education 4 

Electives (Human. & Soc. Sci.. free) at least 26 

Total 66 

If available, it is highly desirable that students substitute Ecology for an elective and a 
basic course in Statistics for an elective. Other desirable courses include Dendrology and 
Soil Science. 

Course Sequence at NCSU 

Summer Camp' Credits 

FOR 204 Silviculture 2 

FOR 261 Forest Communities 2 

FOR 264 Forest Pest Mgmt 1 

FOR 265 Fire Management 1 

FOR 274 Mapping and Mensuration 4 

10 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credit 

CFR 134 Comp. in Nat. Res 1 BO 360 Intro. Ecology 3 

FOR 212 Dendrology 4 BO 365 Ecology Lab 1 

FOR 303 For. Tree Physiology 3 FOR 304 Silviculture 4 

FOR 319 For. Economics 3 FOR 374 For. Inv. Gr. Yield 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 FOR 434 Mgmt. Dec. Mak. For. Wood Prod 3 

ST 311 Intro. Statistics 3 WPS 202 Wood Struct. Prop. I 3 

li l7 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spritig Semester Credits 

ENT 301 Intro. For. Insects 3 FOR 406 For. Inv. Anly. & Plan 4 

FOR 353 Air Photo Int 3 FOR 472 Renew. Res. Pol. & Man 4 

FOR 405 For. Management 4 PP 318 For. Pathology 4 

Advised Elective ' 5 Advised Elective 3 



15 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 141 

15 



'Grades of D or lower not accepted in ENG 112. FOR 274. 303, 304. 319. 374. 405. 406. 
^0 receive transfer credit, courses must be equivalent in content to the required courses at NCSU. 
'For entry into the Forestry curriculum at summer camp, transfer students must have a minimum of 55 transfer credits 
including 6 credits of English and the majority of the mathematics and science requirements. 
'Eight credits of advised electives require approval of student's advisor. 



207 



TRANSFER CURRICULUM. SCIENCE CONCENTRATION' 

Transfer Credits^ 

Subject Credits 

Biology 4 

Chemistry 8 

English 6 

Introductory Economics 3 

Mathematics 12 

Physics 8 

Physical Education 4 

Electives (Human./Soc. Sci.. free) at least 20 

Total 65 

If available, it is highly desirable that students substitute Ecology and a basic course in 
Statistics for an elective. Other desirable courses include Dendrology and Soil Science. 

Course Sequence at NCSU^ 

Summer Camp Credits 

FOR 204 Silviculture 2 

FOR 261 Forest Communities 2 

FOR 264 Forest Pests 1 

FOR 265 Fire Management 1 

FOR 274 Mapping & Mensuration 4 

lo 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CFR134 Comp. in Nat. Res 1 BO 360 Intro. Ecology 3 

FOR 212 Dendrologj' 4 BO 365 Ecology Lab 1 

FOR 303 For. Tree Phys 3 FOR 304 Silviculture 4 

FOR 319 For. Economics 3 FOR 374 For. Inv. Gr. Yield 3 

SSC 200 Soil Science 4 Advised Elective^-* 2 

ST 311 Intro. Statistics 3 Free Elective<'« 3 

18 le 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENT301 Intro. For. Insects 3 FOR 472 Renew. Res. Pol. Man 4 

FOR 405 For, Management 4 PP318 Forestry Pathology 4 

Advised Electives 5 WPS 202 Wood Struct. Prop. I 3 

Free Elective 3 Advised Electives 6 

15 I7 

Minimum Hours for Graduation 141 

'D grades not accepted in ENG 112. FOR 274, 303, 304, 319. 374, 405, 406. 

-To receive transfer credit, courses must be equivalent in content to the required course at NCSU. 
'For entry into the Forestry curriculum at summer camp, transfer students must have a minimum of 55 transfer credits 
including 6 credits of English and the majority of the mathematics and science requirements. 
'Free electives are chosen without restriction. 

'Thirteen credits of advised electives require approval of student's advisor. 
'Student may change sequence of electives, if desired. 

MINOR IN FOREST MANAGEMENT 

The Department of Forestry offers an 18 credit hour minor in Forest Management that is 
open to all baccalaureate degree students at North Carolina State University. The objec- 
tives of the program are to provide fundamental knowledge of forest management to 
students who will pursue careers in related areas of natural resource management and to 
provide interested NCSU students an appreciation for the value of forest resources and the 
need for sound management of those resources. 

The minor in Forest Management includes two different options, each requiring 18 
credit hours. There are no prerequisites for entry into either option. Option 1 is for the 
student who wishes a basic overview of forestry. Option 2 is for students who wish instruc- 
tion and field experience in forestry technical skills and requires that the student attend 



208 



forestry summer camp. For these students, forestry summer camp may be attended after 
either the sophomore or junior years. To be eligible for summer camp, the student must (1) 
have made a C or better in ENG 111 and 112, and (2) have passed BS 100, MA 114 (or MA 
212 or MA 242), and FOR 212. 

To enroll, students should contact the College of Forest Resources Office of Student 
Affairs. 

Option 1 

FOR 212— Dendrology (4 hours) 

FOR 252— Introduction to Forest Science (3 hours) 

(not open to Forestry majors) 
FOR 352 — Forest Measurements and Management (4 hours) 

(not open to Forestry majors) 
FOR 472 — Renewable Resource Policy and Management (4 hours) 
At least one additional 300 or 400 level forestry course (3-4 hours) 

Option 2 

FOR 212-Dendrology (4 hours) 
Forestry Summer Camp (10 hours) 

FOR 204— Silviculture 

FOR 261— Forest Communities 

FOR 264— Forest Pest Management 

FOR 265— Fire Management 

FOR 274— Mapping and Mensuration 
FOR 472— Renewable Resource Policy and Management (4 hours) 



PARKS, RECREATION AND 
TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

Biltmore Hall (Room 4008) 

Professor P. S. Rea, Head of the Department 

Professors: H. A. Devine, C. D. Siderelis, R. E. Sternloff, M. R. Warren. J. D. Wellman, ; Professors Emeriti: T. I. Mines, W. 
E. Smith: Associate Professors: S. L. Kirsch, L. D. Gustke, C. S. Love. B. E. Wilson; Associate Professors Emeriti: G. A. 
Hammon. L. L. Miller. C. C. Stott; Adjunct Associate Professor: H. K. Cordell; Assistant Professor: G. L. Brothers; 
Visiting Assistant Professor: C. A. Cole; Instructor: S. R. Harper; Adjunct Instructors: i . I. Connors. W. C. Singletary, 
Jr.. G. R. Worls; Research Assistants: L. W. Baggs. J. M. McManus. S. Payne; Associate Members of the Faculty: A. 
Attarian (Physical Education), C. E. Chesney (Agricultural Extension Service), L. H. Harkins (Extension Forest 
Resources), A. Lumpkin (Physical Education), J. D. Murray (UNC-Sea Grant), C. S. Vick (Agricultural Extension 
Service). 

The department offers an interdisciplinary program combining elements of natural 
resource management with a concern for human services. Standards adopted by the 
recreation profession make college graduation a requirement for employment. North 
Carolina State University has facilities, staff, curriculum, program and an established 
reputation for comprehensive professional education in the study of parks, recreation and 
tourism management. The program is nationally accredited. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

As increased discretionary time becomes available for large segments of the American 
population, opportunities for growth in the leisure service professions have increased 
dramatically. A recreation and park professional's goal is to influence people to use their 
discretionary time wisely and to improve the quality of their lives. This goal is accomp- 
lished by providing recreation programs and facilities for people in a variety of settings. 



209 



Career opportunities include employment by park and recreation departments operated 
by county and municipal governments: employment by state agencies such as state parks, 
forests, and planning and advisory groups; and the federal government with agencies such 
as the National Park Service, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Forest Service, and military 
establishments. 

Other major employers include youth and family service organizations such as the 
YMC A. Y WC A. Boys Clubs, Boy and Girl Scouts. Industries employ recreation directors to 
head employee recreation programs. Recreation professionals are employed by schools as 
community school coordinators. Areas with perhaps the greatest growth potential for 
employment are tourism agencies and commercial recreation establishments such as 
resorts, private clubs, theme parks, and convention and conference centers. 

CURRICULUM IN PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

The curriculum in parks, recreation and tourism management offers a broad general 
education background, basic professional and technical courses, and the opportunity to 
specialize in a particular field. General education courses are in biology, psychology, 
sociologv', political science, English, mathematics, physical sciences, and economics. Spe- 
cialized courses are required in statistics and the use of computers. 

The curriculum is designed to prepare men and women for a variety of positions in a 
young, dynamic and challenging profession. The focus of the curriculum is on management 
rather than face-to-face leadership. The curriculum provides 44 hours of professional 
course work that includes recreation philosophy, management techniques and skills, fiscal 
management, supervision, facility and site planning, programming, administration, and 
analysis and evaluation. A computer laboratory is utilized in many courses to provide the 
student with the best current technology available. 

In addition to the general education requirements and the core professional require- 
ments, students can begin to attain specialized training through 18 hours of concentration 
courses. At the beginning of the students' junior year they choose one of the following 
concentrations: tourism and commercial recreation, park management, natural resource 
management, or program management (including special emphasis in sports or arts 
management). 

Academic studies on campus are supplemented by practical laboratory experiences in 
the Raleigh area, out-of-state field trips and study opportunities, and a ten- week internship 
with a park, recreation or tourism agency. Cooperative work-study programs are available. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Sprim/ Semester Credits 

BO 200 Plant Life or COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking or 

ZO 201 Animal Life 4 COM (SP) 112 Basic Prin. of Int. Comm 3 

ENGlll Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 121 Introduction to Calculus or RRA 152 Introduction to Recreation 3 

MA 105 Mathematics of Finance or CH or PY Elective 4-5 

MA 114 Intro, to Finite Math Appl 3-4 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

RRA 101 Rec. Res. OrienUtion Lab 1 

Free Elective 3 



17-18 



15-16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

EB201 Econonics I or SOC 301 Human Behavior or 

EB 212 Economics of Agri 3 PSY 376 Human Growth & Dev 3 

RRA 215 Park & Rec. Maint. Mgmt 3 RRA 216 Mging. Park & Rec. Facil 3 

SOC 202 Principles of Sociology or ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

PSY 200 Intro, to Psychology 3 Concentration' 3 

Computer Elective 3 Fine Arts Elective 3 

English Writing Elective 3 Physical Education Elective 1 

Physical Education Elective 1 



16 



16 



210 



JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

RRA 350 Outdoor Recreation Management 3 BO (ZO) 360 and 365 Intro, to Ecology 4 

RRA 358 The Recreation Progratn 4 RRA 359 Leadership Supervision in Rec 3 

Concentration' 6 RRA 451 Facility & Site Planning 3 

Environ. Ethics Elective 3 Concentration' 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 



16 



SUMMER SESSION 
(9 weeks) 

Credits 
RRA 475 Recreation and Park Internship 8 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

RRA 438 Recreation for Special Pop 3 RRA 454 Recreation & Park Finance 3 

RRA 453 Admin. Proc. of Park & Rec. Org 3 RRA 480 Rec. Analysis Evaluation 3 

RRA 476 Post Intern Seminar 1 Concentration' 6 

Concentration' 3 Free Elective 3 

Fine Arts Elective 3 T7 

Free Elective 3 

16 Minimum Hours Required for Graduation ... 135 



'Of the 18 hours in the various concentration areas. 9 to 12 hours are required specifically for the selected concentration 
and 9 to 15 hours are elected from controlled areas. 



MINOR IN PARKS, RECREATION AND TOURISM MANAGEMENT 

The academic minor in Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, is offered to 
students interested in gaining a basic knowledge of the parks, recreation and tourism field 
and an understanding of the importance of leisure and recreation in American society. It is 
not intended to prepare students for a professional career in parks, recreation and tourism. 
Seven hours of required courses and nine hours of electives are necessary to complete the 
minor. The program provides a background in recreation and park management which is 
useful to students who will 1) assume full-time careers that are associated with recreation 
and park services (in such fields as landscape architecture, public administration, and 
forestry) and 2) become involved in the park and recreation field as a volunteer, program 
leader or policy making board member with such organizations as the Scouts, Y's, art 
advisory councils, and conservation organizations. 



WOOD AND PAPER SCIENCE 

Biltmore Hall (Room 1022) 

Professor R. J. Thomas, Head of the Department 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M. W. Kelly 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor and Elis & Signe Olsson Professor: J. S. Gratzl 

Reuben B. Robertson Professor: H-M Chong 

Professors: H-M. Chang. E. B. Cowling. E. L. Deal. I. S. Goldstein. J. S. Gratzl. C. A. Hart. T. W. Joyce. M. W. Kelly. H. G. 
Olf. R. G. Pearson. E. A. Wheeler: Professor Emeriti: A. C. Barefoot. E. L. Ellwood, R. G. Hitchings: Adjunct Professors: 
L. L. Edwards. T. K. Kirk. S. Y. Lin. T. 0. Norris. R. P. Singh: Associate Professors: R. C. Gilmore. S. J. Hanover. J. A. 
Heitmann. Jr.. L. G. Jahn. H. Jameel: Adjunct Associate Professor: R. B. Phillips; Associate Professors Emeriti: L. H. 
Hobbs. C. G. Landes. C. N. Rogers: Adjunct Assistant Professor: A. G. Raymond. Jr.: Instructor: A. G. Kirkman: 

211 



Research Associatex: C-L. Chen. E. Jerger. N. C. Weidhaas: Research Assistants: W. S. Bryan. M. V. Byrd; Associate 
Member of the Faculty: J. P. Roise (Forestry). 

The wood-based industry of North Carolina, as well as throughout the South, is a vital 
part of the nation's economy. In terms of the dollar value of shipments of wood products, the 
South leads all regions of the country. North Carolina manufactures more wood household 
furniture than any other state, ranks third in shipment value for all wood-based products 
and second in number of employees and wages paid. Thus, many opportunities exist in 
North Carolina and other southern states for careers in the wood-based industry. 

The Department of Wood and Paper Science offers two curricula leading to Bachelor of 
Science degrees— ( 1) Pulp and Paper Science and Technology, and (2) Wood Products. Both 
curricula prepare young men and women for careers in the wood-based and allied indus- 
tries or in government agencies connected with wood resources. 



PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Professor R. J. Thomas, In Charge 

The Pulp and Paper Science and Technology curriculum prepares students for careers in 
pulp and paper, an industry that ranks as the fifth largest manufacturing industry in the 
United States. Science, engineering, and mathematics form the basis for a multi- 
disciplinary approach to understanding the fundamental manufacturing principles 
involved. Students study wood pulping processes, chemical and by-product recovery sys- 
tems, and pulp bleaching. In addition, various paper-making operations such as refining, 
sizing, coating, and drying are studied. 

Three concentrations are available emphasizing the technological or engineering aspects 
of pulping and papermaking. The Technology Concentration provides a broad background 
for those students anticipating careers in mill operations or with paper industry supplier 
organizations. Greater depth in the underlying engineering principles or their applications 
can be obtained from the Science Concentration or the Chemical Engineering Concentra- 
tion, either of which provides a good foundation for graduate study. Students who have 
completed the Chemical Engineering Concentration in pulp and paper science and technol- 
ogy can, in cooperation with the College of Engineering and with an additional semester of 
study, earn a Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering as a second degree. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Graduates of this curriculum find opportunities for challenging careers as process 
engineers, product development engineers, process control chemists, technical service 
engineers, quality control supervisors, and production supervisors. Design and construc- 
tion engineering companies employ graduates as project engineers, and pulp and paper 
machinery companies use their education and skills for technical service and sales posi- 
tions. Opportunities for managerial and executive positions are available to graduates as 
they gain experience. 

SUMMER INTERNSHIP 

All pulp and paper majors are required to work one summer in a pulp or paper mill. One 
hour of academic credit is granted after completion of 12 weeks of mill work and presenta- 
tion of a satisfactory report. In addition, students are urged to work in mills the other two 
summers, as the work provides valuable practical experience. Departmental advisors 
assist students in locating summer work. 



212 



REGIONAL PROGRAM 

The pulp and paper curriculum is a regional program approved by the Southern 
Regional Education Board as the undergraduate program to serve the Southeast in this 
field. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Approximately 80 undergraduate academic scholarships are granted annually to new 
and continuing students by more than 100 companies comprising the Pulp and Paper 
Foundation. 

TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. H 4 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper Science 1 WPS 102 Intro. Pulp Paper Sci. & Tech 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective- 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 



16 



Physical Education Elective 1 

18 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 CHE 205 Chemical Process Princ 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 PY 208 General Physics 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 WPS 242 Wood Fiber Analysis 2 

Physical Education Elective ^ Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

~T^ Physical Education Elective 1 

18 

SUMMER SESSION 

Credits 
WPS 211 Pulp and Paper Internship 1 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 ENG 331 Communication for Engineering and 

CH 331 Intro. Physical Chemistry 4 Technology 3 

WPS 321 Pulp & Paper Technology I 3 WPS 322 Pulp & Paper Technology II 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 WPS 332 Wood and Pulping Chemistry 4 

Technical Elective ^ WPS 355 Pulp & Paper Unit Proc. I ;3 

~rj Free Elective 3 

16 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 360 Pulp & Paper Unit Processes II 3 WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

WPS 413 Paper Properties & Additives 4 WPS 410 Systems Analysis & Ctrl 3 

WPS 415 Proj. Mgt. & Control I 2 WPS 416 Proj. Mgmt. & Control II 2 

WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Technical Elective 3 Technical Elective 1 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

Is Is 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 135 

'Basic economics course recommended. 

^See approved list: 6 hours each must be taken in both humanities and social science courses. The remaining 6 hours 
may be taken in either humanities or social science. 



213 



SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 

PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



FaH Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper Science 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' ^ 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 1 12 Composition & Reading 3 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calculus II 4 

WPS 102 Intro, to Wood & Paper Science 1 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

Is 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 4 

PY 205 General Physics 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective ^ 

16 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 301 Applied Diff. Equations I 3 

PY 208 General Physics 4 

WPS 242 Wood Fiber Analysis 2 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



SUMMER SESSION 

Credit"! 
WPS 211 Pulp and Paper Internship 1 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits 
CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 



CH 431 Physical Chemistry I 3 

ST 361 Intro, to Statistics for Engineers 3 

WPS 321 Pulp and Paper Technology I 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 



Spring Semester Crediti 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

ENG 331 Communication for Engineering and 

Technology 3 

WPS 322 Pulp and Paper Technology II 3 

WPS 332 Wood & Pulping Chemistry 4 

Technical Electives 3 

16 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits 
WPS 413 Paper Prop, and Additives 4 



WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective- 3 

Technical Electives 6 

19 



Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Technical Electives 7 

Free Elective 3 

le 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 135 



■Basic economics course recommended. 

-See approved list: 6 hours each must be taken in humanities and in social science courses. The remaining 6 hours may 
be taken in either humanities or social science. 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING CONCENTRATION 

PULP AND PAPER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY CURRICULUM 



Fall Semester 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 1 1 1 Composition and Rhetoric 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood and Paper Sci 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

16 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 1 12 Composition and Reading 3 

GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

MA 241 Analvtic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

WPS 102 Intro, to Pulp Paper Sci. & Tech 1 

Physical Education Elective 1 

15 



214 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles 4 CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MA 301 Applied Diff. Equations I 3 

PY 205 General Physics 4 PY 208 General Physics 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 WPS 242 Wood Fiber Analysis 2 

'T^ Physical Education Elective 1 

17 

SUMMER 

Credits 
WPS 211 Pulp and Paper Internship 1 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CHE 311 Transport Processes I 3 CH 437 Physical Chemistry for Engineers 3 

CHE 315 Chem. Proc. Thermodynamics 3 CHE 312 Transport Processes II 3 

MAT 201 Struct. & Prop, of EngT. Matr'ls 3 CHE 316 Thermo. Chemical & Phase Equilibria .. 3 

WPS 321 Pulp & Paper Technology I 3 WPS 322 Pulp & Paper Technology II 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sei. Electives 6 WPS 332 Wood and Pulping Chemistry 4 

18 16 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CHE 330 Chemical Engineering Lab I 2 ECE 331 Prin. of Electrical Engr. or 

WPS 360 Pulp & Paper Unit Processes II 3 CHE 425 Proc. System Analysis & Ctrl 3 

WPS 413 Paper Properties & Additives 4 WPS 403 Paper Process Analysis 3 

WPS 415 Proj. Mgmt. & Control I 2 WPS 410 System Analysis & Control 3 

WPS 471 Pulping Process Analysis 3 WPS 416 Proj. Mgmt. & Control II 2 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 



17 



Technical Elective 1 

"l8 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 135 

'See approved list: 6 hours must be taken from humanities, 6 hours must be taken from social science and the remaining 
6 hours may be taken from either humanities or social science. 

Note: To complete the requirements for a B.S. in CHE students will need CHE 421, CHE 425 and CHE 446. 



WOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Professor M. W. Kelly, In Charge 

The wood products industry is of major importance to the economy of North Carolina and 
the Southeast. It ranks third in the state in the value of shipments, behind only textiles and 
tobacco products, and it is second to textiles in the number of employees. The managerial 
opportunities for graduates with a B.S. in Wood Products are excellent. Graduates of this 
program have a broad education in the humanities, communication skills, social and 
natural sciences, as well as the professional training required for managerial positions in 
the wood products industry. The curriculum is similar to a material science program, based 
on the natural resource wood, with an emphasis on industrial manufacturing and manage- 
ment. Graduates have a thorough knowledge of wood as a raw material that enables them to 
properly design and process wood into a variety of products of value to society. As non- 
renewable resources diminish and their cost of procurement increases, the demand for 
wood, a renewable resource, increases. Currently, career opportunities are excellent and 
continued demand for individuals with a wood products education is anticipated. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The Wood Products curriculum at North Carolina State University, which is accredited 
by the Society of Wood Science and Technology, prepares graduates for production super- 



215 



vision, staff positions and management responsibilities in all types and sizes of wood 
industries. Careers also include industrial positions with both large and small companies 
manufacturing consumer wood products such as furniture. Graduates are also in demand 
by suppliers to wood manufacturing industries such as chemical and machinery compan- 
ies. Opportunities are also available with state and federal government in research, mar- 
keting, or extension activities. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

Approximately ten undergraduate academic scholarships are granted annually to new 
and continuing students through the Forestry Foundation. 

TECHNICAL ELECTIVES 

The curriculum provides a minimum of 15 credit hours for technical electives which may 
be used to pursue a minor in a variety of areas including business management, industrial 
engineering, forestry management or economics. For those undergraduates desiring ex- 
posure to more than one area, the technical electives may be chosen from these areas and 
from others, e.g., furniture manufacturing and management, and graphic communication. 

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS 

Dual degree programs are available whereby students can obtain, in addition to a 
Bachelor of Science in wood products, a second Bachelor of Science degree in forestry, pulp 
and paper science, furniture manufacturing and management, or business management. 
Credits beyond those required for the single degree program are necessary and minimum 
of an additional year of study is usually required. Individuals interested in a dual degree 
should contact the appropriate departmental office. 

CURRICULUM IN WOOD PRODUCTS 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BS 100 General Biology or CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

BO 200 Plant Life 4 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

ENGlll Composition & Rhetoric 3 GC 101 Engineering Graphics I 2 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A' 4 MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Caic. B' 3 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 WPS 202 Wood Struct. & Prop. I 3 

WPS 101 Intro, to Wood & Paper Sci 1 Physical Education Elective ^ 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 jg 

le 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CFR134 Computers in Forest Res 1 EB201 Economics I (Soc. Sci.) 3 

CHIOS General Chemistry n 4 PY 212 General Physics H 4 

PY211 General Physics I 4 WPS 203 Wood Struct. & Prop. H 4 

WPS 240 Wood Products 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Free Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 ~J^ 

le 

SUMMER PRACTICUM 

Credits 

WPS 205 Wood Products Practicum 5 

WPS 210 Forest Products Internship 1 



216 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 331 Comm. Tech. Info 3 WPS 302 Wood Processing II 4 

ST 361 Statistics for Engineers 3 WPS 316 Wood-Polymer Prin 4 

WPS 301 Wood Processing I 4 WPS 344 Intro, to Quality Control 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 WPS 350 Wood Products Literature 2 

Technical Elective 3 Technical Electives 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 ~jT 

17 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

WPS 441 Wood Mechanics 4 WPS 434 Quan. Meth. of Dec. Mak. in 

WPS 482 Senior Topics in WPS 2 Forest Products 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 WPS 444 Wood Composite 3 

Technical Elective 3 WPS 450 Wood Ind. Case Studies 2 

Free Elective 3 Technical Electives 6 

~77 Free Elective 3 

17 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 136 

'Students with appropriate mathematical aptitude and interest are encouraged to substitute MA 141. MA 241 and MA 
242 for the mathematical sequence listed. 

^See approved list: 6 hours must be taken from Humanities and 3 hours must be taken from Social Science and remaining6 
hours may be taken from either Humanities or Social Science. 

MINOR IN WOOD PRODUCTS 

The Wood Products minor is available to all undergraduate students, except Wood 
Products majors, enrolled in the University as degree candidates. The minor requires 15 
credit hours. Ten hours of required courses provide a general background in wood anatomy, 
physical properties, and wood-based composites. Five elective hours may be chosen from 
areas including wood processing, wood mechanics, quality control, and wood-polymer 
interactions. 

The Wood Products minor, with its focus on wood properties and processing, is designed 
to be especially valuable to students majoring in programs leading to careers in areas such 
as structural design, furniture manufacturing, and forestry. Students interested in natural 
and renewable materials will also find the minor useful. 



COLLEGE OF HUMANITIES AND 
SOCIAL SCIENCES 

Caldwell Hall (Room 106) 

W. B. Toole. Ill, Dean 

M. M. Sawhney, Associate Dean 

G. D. Garson, Associate Dean for Planning and Management 

E. D. Sylla, Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Programs 

W. C. Fitzgerald, Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Affairs 

S. E. Simonsen, Assistant to the Dean for International Studies 



217 



J. N. Wall. Director of Honors/Scholars Programs 

D. B. Greene, Coordinator of Arts Studies 

L. H. Hambourger, Coordinator of Evening Programs and Assistant to the Dean 

J. S. Griffin. Academic Coordinator for African-American Students 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers programs of study which lead to 
baccalaureate and advanced degrees in the disciplines comprising the humanities and 
social sciences, and also offers courses in these areas which are part of the programs of all 
undergraduate students in the university. In this way the university provides an opportun- 
ity for its students to prepare for a full life in professions and occupations that require 
intellectual flexibility, broad knowledge, and a basic comprehension of human beings and 
their problems. 

Ten departments are included in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences: Account- 
ing, Economics and Business (both of the Division of Economics and Business); Communi- 
cation; English; Foreign Languages and Literatures; History; Philosophy and Religion; 
Physical Education; Political Science and Public Administration; and Sociology, Anthro- 
pology and Social Work (also a department in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences). 
The Division of Multidisciplinary Studies, an academic unit responsible for interdiscipli- 
nary programs, is also affiliated with this college. Undergraduate majors are offered in 
economics, accounting, business management, communication, English, history, French, 
Spanish, philosophy, political science, sociology, social work, and multidisciplinary studies. 
In some departments special concentrations are available within the major programs: e.g., 
writing and editing (English), law and political philosophy (political science or philosophy), 
anthropology (sociology), religious studies (philosophy), criminal justice (political science 
or sociology) and international studies (any HSS major). A teacher education option is 
available in English, French, Spanish, and social studies (history, political science, sociol- 
ogy). Enrollments in teacher education programs may be limited. Degrees granted include 
the Bachelor of Arts, the Bachelor of Science, the Bachelor of Social Work, the Master of 
Arts, and the Doctor of Philosophy, as well as professional degrees in economics, political 
science, and sociology. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS PROGRAM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Creditx Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 'i ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 History 3 

History' 3 Mathematics 3-4 

Mathematics- 3-4 Philosophy* 3 

Foreign Language 201 (IntermediateP 3 Social Science 3 

Social Science' 3 Physical Education 1 

16-17 16-17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fnll Si'tnester Creditu Siirim/ Semester Credit.^ 

Literature' 3 Literature 3 

Natural Science' 3-4 Natural Science 3-4 

Social Science 3 Social Science 3 

K'eclives 6 Elective 3 

Physical Education ■■.. 1 Arts and I>etters Elective" 3 

lg.l7 Physical Education 1 

16-17 
.JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spriny Semester Crvdiia 

Major" 9 Major 9 

Electives 6 Electives 6 

15 li 



218 



SENIOR YEAR 
Full Semcxter Credih Sitrinij Semester Credits 

Major 9 Major 6 

Eleetives 6 Electives 9 

Is Is 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation . . . 124 

' This two-semester requirement includes a course concerned with pre-industrial Western or non-Western societies (HI 
207. 208. 209. 215. 216. 263. 264, 275, or 276). and another dealing with the United States or post-industrial Western 
societies (HI 205. 210, 221. 222. 233. 243, 244, 251, 252). 

-Two semesters are required for economics and business or sociology majors (MA 121. 131, or 141 and 114 required for 
economics and business: MA 111 and 131 recommended forsociology but any two mathematics courses other than MA 
101 allowed). For all other humanities and social science majors the requirement may be satisfied with any two 
mathematics courses other than MA 101 or one mathematics course other than MA 101 plus a course in computer 
science, statistics, or logic. 

^Demonstrated proficiency at the first-semester intermediate level (FL 201 in French. Spanish. German, Russian, 
Portuguese. Italian. Latin, Classical Greek. Biblical Hebrew. Japanese, Chinese, or Swahili. In order to enroll at the 
201 level, prerequisites must be met through course work or the Placement Test. Demonstrated proficiency at the 
second-semester intermediate level (FL 202) in one language is required for English and foreign language majors. 

^The requirements call for twelve hours of social science representing at least three of the following disciplines: 
anthropology, economics, political science, psychology', sociology. At least nine of these hours must be outside the 
student's major field. 

■■■Three hours of philosophy, exclusive of logic (PHI 201 and 335). are required. 

'This requirement may be satisfied with (1) anv two of the following survev courses: ENG 261, ENG 262, ENG 265, 
ENG 266, FLG 316, FLG 323, FLF 301, FLF 302, FLS 301, FLS 302, FLS304: (2) with ENG 251-252: (3) with ENG 
251 plus anv course listed in (1) except ENG 261-262: or (4) with ENG 252 plus anv course listed in (1) except ENG 
265-266. 

■The natural science requirement calls for a minimum of eight credit hours. At least one course must include a 
laboratory experience. Students must receive credit for at least one basic introductory course from physics, chemistry. 
geolog>'. or the biological sciences. These courses include CH 101. CH 103. CH 107. CHllLPY 205. PY 208. PY 211. pV 
212. PY 221. PY 223/225. and PY 231: MEA 101 with MEA 110: BS 100 or BS 105: BO 200. To complete the 
requirement, students may take any of the courses listed above, except that if BS 100 or BS 105 has been taken the other 
may not be taken for credit and that BO 200 may not be combined with either BS 100 or BS 105. Otherwise the 
requirement may be completed with any course in botany, chemistry (except CH 105), genetics, physics, zoology, or 
marine, earth, and atmospheric sciences (except MEA 120. 208. or 215). or with ENT 425. 

"One of the following courses outside the student's major is required: COM (SP) 103. COM (SP)213. COM (SP) 321. COM 
(SP) 411: DN 141. DN 142: ENG 346. ENG 347. ENG 390: FL 350: FLF 352: FLR 303. FLR 304: GRK 310. GRK ,'320: 
HA201.HA202, HA203,HA298, HA401,HA402, HA404,HA498:MUS200,MUS210,MUS215,MUS220, MUS 
230, MUS 240, MUS 301, MUS 320: any religion course except Hebrew language courses. Also, FL295, FL298. FL495 
and FL 498 may be used in special circumstances to satisfy this requirement. 

' Major requirements for the Bachelor of Arts range from 30-51 hours. Most of the major programs call for 30 hours of 
work above the basic courses in a discipline. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE PROGRAM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry or 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective- 3 Mathematics 3-4 

Mathematics' 4 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 



15 



Physical Education Elective 1 



14-15 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Course I-Major 3 Course II-Major 3 

Eng Lit/Foreign Language^ 3 Foreign Languages/ English Literature 3 

Mathematics 3-4 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

PY 205 or 211 General Physics I 4 Mathematics 3 

Philosophy^ 3 PY 208 or 212 General Physics II 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 Physical Education Elective 1 



17-18 17 



219 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

BS 100 General Biology 4 ZO 201 General Zoology or 

Course I Option^' 3 BO 200 Plant Life 4 

Course Ill-Major 3 Course Il-Option 3 

History or Philosophy of Science' 3 Course IV-Major 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Course V-Major 3 



16 



Elective 3 

16 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Course Ill-Option 3 Course V-Option 3 

Course IV-Option 3 Course VIII-Major 3 

Course VI-Major 3 Course IX-Major 3 

Course VII-Major 3 Electives _6 

Elective ^ 15 

15 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 127 

'Four courses are required, includingeither the sequence MA 141. 241. 242or MA 131, 231. The remaining course(s) are to 
be chosen from MA 114. 214. 303. .341. and 405. 

■Twelve hours in humanities and/or social sciences outside the major discipline are required. 
'Six hours of foreign language and/or English literature at the 200 level or above are required. 
'Any course in philosophy, excluding logic (PHI 201. 335) and philosophy of science (PHI 340). 
'A 15 hour concentration is required in a mathematics, science, or engineering discipline. 
'A course in the history or philosophy of science or mathematics to be chosen from a specified list of alternatives. 

CONCENTRATION IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

In recognition of the increasing need to understand the complexities of an interdependent 
world, the College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers a concentration in Interna- 
tional Studies to students interested in focusing upon international affairs. This concentra- 
tion is offered in conjunction with a departmental major, the requirements of which must 
also be met by a student electing the concentration. 

The concentration is designed to enhance the student's understanding of the contempor- 
ary world, its resources and its problems, thereby enabling the student to be a more 
effective participant in world affairs. It consists of three integrated Seminars in Interna- 
tional Affairs, demonstrated competency in a modern foreign language, and a minimum of 
five courses focusing upon a particular geographical area of the world or upon a particular 
international issue or set of issues. Each student's program will be individually designed in 
consultation with the student's departmental advisor, subject to the approval of the Com- 
mittee on International Studies, the Assistant to the Dean for International Studies, and the 
Dean of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences. 

MINOR IN INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

The International Studies Minor is offered to all students in the University who want to 
add a significant international dimension to their departmental miajors. This minor pro- 
gram enables students to explore international topics, issues and research from cross- 
cultural, transnational perspectives. The program will provide some tools that students can 
use to understand better the global context of the modern world and to learn the interna- 
tional dimensions of their chosen fields of study. 

MINOR IN ARTS STUDIES 

The College of Humanities and Social Sciences offers an academic minor in Arts Studies 
to all majors in the University. This interdisciplinary minor is designed to enrich the 
student's university experience, to serve as a foundation for learning and understanding in 
the arts beyond the university years, and to stimulate intellectual development in ways that 
may reinforce or complement the objectives of the student's major. This minor provides the 
student with a fundamental understanding of the historical, theoretical, and practical 
disciplines of the arts. A total of eighteen credit hours must be taken to complete this minor. 

220 



Students interested in the minor should refer to the Arts Studies courses listed in the front 
section of this catalog and consult with the Arts Studies Coordinator in the dean's office of 
the College of Humanities and Social Studies. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

Each of the degree-granting departments in the College of Humanities and Social 
Sciences has an honors program designed to encourage outstanding students to develop 
their intellectual potential to the fullest extent possible through individualized study, 
special seminars, and close association with faculty members in their major field. The 
college also, in conjunction with the Division of Student Affairs, sponsors a residential 
Scholars of the College Program for students who show exceptional academic promise. The 
participants take special sections of freshman and sophomore level courses and a series of 
cultural events and weekly forums before undertaking specialized honors work in their 
major. In their junior year they participate each semester in a special Junior Scholars 
Seminar and attend monthly forums. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

In addition to the university-wide awards available, the following scholarships are 
offered to entering freshmen: 
Nathaniel C. Browder Scholarship ($1000) 
Bess B. and Lynton Yates Ballentine Scholarship ($1000) 
American Defender Life Scholarship ($1000) 
Humanities and Social Sciences Merit Scholarship ($1000) 

Claire Simmons Allan-Sampson Memorial Scholarship in Moral Philosophy ($1000) 
Thomas Jefferson Scholarship in Agriculture and the Humanities ($1000) 
Benjamin Franklin Scholars Program (joint program with College of Engineering) 

($1000-$2000 per year for four years) 
Eli Whitney Double Degree Program in Textiles and International Studies ($1000-$2000 

per year for four years) 

For further information, write: 
Dr. John Wall 

Director. Honors/Scholars Programs 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences 
North Carolina State University 
Box 8105 
Raleigh, N. C. 27695-8105 

PRE-LAW PROGRAM 

Law schools neither prescribe nor recommend a particular undergraduate curriculum 
for prospective candidates. The Association of American Law Schools has, however, 
recommended an undergraduate education of the broadest possible scope as the best means 
of developing the communicative, critical, and creative skills and abilities fundamental to 
success in legal studies and practice. A student may prepare for post-graduate work in law 
in any of the majors offered by the ten degree-granting departments in the College of 
Humanities and Social Sciences. Alternatively, the student may elect the Concentration in 
Philosophy of Law (Department of Philosophy and Religion) or the Concentration in Law 
and Political Philosophy (Department of Political Science and Public Administration) or 
may apply for admission to Multidisciplinary Studies during the sophomore year and, in 
consultation with an advisor, design a pre-law major involving two or more academic areas. 

All interested entering freshmen are invited to attend a special orientation session for 
pre-law students. These students are also invited to join the Pre-law Student Association, an 
undergraduate organization that provides pre-law students with information concerning 
preparation for the law school admission test (LSAT) as well as the study and practice of 
law through guest speakers, discussion sessions, and other activities. Consult Prof. Baumer, 
737-2608, or Prof. Reid, 737-2481, for more information. 



221 



COOPERATIVE EDUCATION 

Cooperative Education in Humanities and Social Sciences seeks to broaden the student's 
intellectual horizons and at the same time to provide an introduction to the vi^orld of 
business, industry, government, or finance in preparation for a career after graduation. In 
this program the freshman and senior years are usually spent on campus while the sopho- 
more and junior years are devoted either to alternate periods of on-campus study and 
off-campus work or to a parallel arrangement of part-time work and part-time study on a 
continuous basis. The student is paid for work experiences by the employer. Ordinarily the 
program takes five years to complete, but those who are willing to attend summer school or 
take on a summer co-op assignment can finish in four years. Transfer students are eligible 
and all interested students are urged to apply early in the academic year. The program is 
also open to graduate students although less time is required on work assignment. 

Further information may be obtained from D. G. Branch, Coordinator of Cooperative 
Education. 213 Peele Hall (737-2300). 

JEFFERSON SCHOLARS IN AGRICULTURE AND THE HUMANITIES 

(See also College of Agriculture and Life Sciences) 

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program in Agriculture and the Humanities is a joint 
program of the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences. It is a double degree program which permits participants to have two 
concentrations: one in an area of agriculture, such as agronomy, animal science, food 
science, or horticulture, and one in an area of humanities/social sciences, such as business 
management, public policy, international studies, or general humanities. The double 
degree program may be individually designed to meet each student's particular interests 
and career goals. The purpose of the program is to produce potential leaders in agriculture 
who have not only technical expertise but also an appreciation for the social, political, and 
cultural issues that effect decision-making. 

Each spring a number of entering freshmen are chosen to receive scholarships to partici- 
pate in the Jefferson program. In addition, other qualified students may choose to pursue a 
double major in agriculture and the humanities under the Jefferson program. 

Students interested in applying to the Jefferson Scholars program should contact: Office 
of the Dean, College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Box 8101, North Carolina State 
University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8101, or the Office of the Associate Dean, College of Agri- 
culture and Life Sciences, Box 7601, before January 15. 

For more information, contact the program coordinator. Dr. Gerald Elkan (4521 
Gardner Hall, 737-3945) or Lynda Hambourger, Assistant to the Dean, Humanities and 
Social Sciences (106 Caldwell Hall, 737-2467). 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SCHOLARS PROGRAM 

This double degree program, a joint undertaking of the College of Engineering and the 
College of Humanities and Social Sciences, provides a unique opportunity to integrate a 
solid base of knowledge in technology or science with the broad philosophical perspective of 
the humanities. In five years, students can earn both a B.S. in an engineering/computer 
science major and a B.A. in multidisciplinary studies. The curriculum for the double 
degree program, which calls for 171 semester hours, has four main components: (1) a strong 
general education, (2) especially designed interdisciplinary and problem defining courses, 
(3) all technical course requirements associated with the engineering degrees, and (4) a 
30-hour multidisciplinary concentration (including a three-hour senior thesis) designed 
jointly by the student and his/her advisers. 

Merit scholarship awards are available for high-achieving students who participate in 
the Franklin Scholars program. For more information, contact the Director of Academic 
Affairs, College of Engineering (118H Page Hall, 737-2315) or the Assistant Dean for 
Undergraduate Affairs. College of Humanities and Social Sciences (106 Caldwell Hall, 
737-2467). 



222 



ELI WHITNEY DOUBLE DEGREE PROGRAM IN TEXTILES AND 
INTERNATIONAL STUDIES 

This joint program between the College of Textiles and the College of Humanities and 
Social Sciences allows a student to earn a B.S. in textile and apparel management and a 
B.A. in multidisciplinary studies with a concentration in international studies. This dual 
degree is designed to prepare students for work in the increasingly international textile 
industry. The program includes all the technical course requirements associated with the 
textiles and apparel management degree. For the B.A. in multidisciplinary studies, stu- 
dents choose from among three areas of concentration: the Pacific Rim (language study in 
Japanese or Chinese), Latin American (language study in Spanish), or Europe (language 
study in German or Italian). The program, which takes four to five years to complete, also 
includes an overseas internship. 

Merit scholarship awards are available for high-achieving students who participate in 
the double degree program in Textiles and international studies. For more information, 
contact Dr. Gordon Berkstresser, Textile Management and Techology (142 Nelson Hall, 
737-3442) or the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Affairs, College of Humanities and 
Social Science (106 Caldwell Hall, 737-2467). 

FOLGER INSTITUTE 

North Carolina State University is a member of the Folger Institute of Renaissance and 
Eighteenth-Century Studies, a unique collaborative enterprise sponsored by the Folger 
Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C., and twenty universities in the Middle Atlantic 
region. Each year the institute offers an interdisciplinary program in the humanities — 
seminars, workshops, symposia, colloquia, and lectures. Admission is open to faculty and 
students of North Carolina State University, and a limited number of fellowships are 
available through the campus Folger Institute Committee. 



ACCOUNTING 

See Division of Economics and Business 



COMMUNICATION 

Winston Hall (Room 201) 

Professor W. J. Jordan, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor R. S. Rodgers, Assistant Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor E. T. Funkhouser, Coordinator of Advising 

Fro/cs.sors; W.G. Franklin. W.J. Jordan. R. S. Rogers; Professor Emeriti: C. A. Parker . Associate Professors:^. Anderson, 
L. R. Camp, P. C. Caple, D. A. DeJoy. R. Leonard. L. W. Long, H. E. Munn, Jr., B. L. Russell, R. L. Schrag: Assistant 
Professors: E. T. Funkhouser, V. Gallagher, G. A. Hankins, D. Ivy, M. Javidi, N. H. Snow; Lecturers:}. Alchediak, D. L. 
Baker. C. A. Elleman, T. J. Kauffman, M. Pandich; Teaching Technician: M. Drabick. 

The Communication program provides training in human communication for profes- 
sionals entering business, industry, social service and education. The objective is to produce 
graduates whose understanding of communication problems and solutions makes them 
uniquely qualified to contribute their expertise to the betterment of society. Recognizing 
the complexity of human communication acts, the department approaches the study of 
communication from humanistic, social science, and natural science perspectives with 
concentrations in communication, mass communication, public relations, communication 



223 



disorders, and theatre. The department is strongly committed to training professionals to 
address the complex human communication problems found in modern business, industry, 
government and social welfare organizations. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Increasingly, organizations are recognizing the need for skilled communication profes- 
sionals in all facets of the workplace. Consequently, depending upon the area of specializa- 
tion, graduates may find employment opportunities as communication consultants, media 
specialists, trainers, public relations specialists, therapists, or performers. In addition, 
many employers seek graduates with demonstrated competencies in human communica- 
tion to fill a wide variety of positions which require constant and skillful contact with the 
public or with personnel. 

The department sponsors the Student Communication Association which is open to all 
majors and offers scholarly and social activities. The department also has a chapter of 
Alpha Epsilon Rho. the National Honorary Broadcasting Society; a chapter of the Public 
Relations Student Society of America: a Women in Communications. Inc. student chapter; a 
chapter of Lambda Pi Epsilon. a national student honorary; a chapter of American Speech, 
Hearing and Language Student Association; and Black Repertory Theatre. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION 

Communication majors are required to earn a grade of C or better in 36 semester hours of 
Communication. Five courses or 12 credit hours (COM (SP) 190, COM (SP) 110, COM (SP) 
112. COM (SP) 200. and COM (SP) 390) are required. Twenty-four (24) additional credit 
hours are required in one of the five Concentrations: Communication Concentration; Mass 
Communication Concentration: Public Relations Concentration: Communication Dis- 
orders Concentration: or Theatre Concentration. Students must have a 2.0 grade point 
average to be eligible for graduation. 

MINOR IN THEATRE 

The Department of Communication offers an academic Minor in Theatre to all majors 
except those in the Department of Communication. This program is designed to provide the 
student with a basic understanding of the artistic, technical, and scholarly disciplines of 
theatre. A total of eighteen hours must be taken to complete the minor, with twelve of these 
hours in required courses and six in elected courses. Theatre courses are identified in the 
Communication curriculum by prefixes ending with the number 3. Any student interested 
in this academic minor should consult the Assistant Head of the Department of Communi- 
cation. 

MINOR IN FILM STUDIES 

The Departments of English and Communication and the Division of Multidisciplinary 
Studies offer a minor in film studies. The minor provides an introduction to the nature of the 
film experience, some background in the history of the medium, and the opportunity for 
in-depth study of selected topics. To complete the minor, 15 hours are required, distributed 
as follows: 

Required courses (6 credits) are ENG 282 Introduction to Film and either COM (SP) 364 
Film Historv to 1940 or COM (SP) 374 Film History Since 1940, plus nine credit hours 
selected from the following: ENG 382, ENG 492, COM (SP) 244, COM (SP) 364 or 374 
(whichever course was not taken to fulfill the required course), MDS (UNI) 480, HI 336, and 
DN 316 (prerequisite waived, consent of instructor). Any student taking this minor cannot 
count courses from the minor toward his/her major. 

MINOR IN JOURNALISM 

(See English Department) 



224 



DIVISION OF ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

R. L. Clark, Interim Head of Division 

E. W. Erickson, Director of the Center for Economics and Business Studies 

D. K. Pearce, Graduate Administrator, Economics Graduate Programs 

B. L. Puryear, Director of Academic Services and Coordinator of Advising 

A. F. Nowel, Undergraduate Program Adviser 

T. J. Stiles, Career Planning and Placement Counselor 

Young men and women interested in preparing for careers in private industry, public 
and private accounting, and government or for graduate study in economics, accounting, 
business or law should consider one of the degree programs available through the Division 
of Economics and Business. The division offers programs of study leading to Bachelor of 
Arts degrees in accounting, business management, and economics. A Bachelor of Science 
degree in economics is also available. Degree programs in agricultural business manage- 
ment and agricultural economics are included under listing in the College of Agriculture 
and Life Sciences, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics. 

The division's degree programs in accounting and business management equip students 
to understand the business environment and make decisions. Students learn the theoretical 
underpinnings that shape and guide the economy and they receive extensive instruction in 
applying current management techniques and skills to everyday business problems. The 
curricula are designed to prepare the student for a lifetime of career development and 
growth. 

The programs in economics are designed to enhance the student's awareness and under- 
standing of how modern economies function. The courses examine both economy-wide and 
firm concepts, with the latter carefully integrated with the business management and 
accounting programs. 

The division has more than 2000 majors and 100 faculty members. The faculty includes 
many distinguished scholars who are dedicated to teaching and internationally recognized 
for their research. 

The division offers a variety of master's degrees, including a Master of Science in 
Management, and a Ph.D. in economics. 

FACILITIES 

The division maintains microcomputer, mainframe computer access and library facili- 
ties to support its teaching programs and faculty research. The Microcomputer Instruc- 
tional Laboratory consists of IBM Personal Computers linked to printers and memory 
devices in a local area network. This laboratory is used as an integral part of instruction in 
some courses and for specific, independent assignments in others. The G. W. Forster 
Library contains major professional and business journals and certain government publi- 
cations that are available to students for completing course assignments and for independ- 
ent study. The Programming Applications Laboratory provides technically trained cleri- 
cal and programming personnel to assist in the preparation of work for mainframe 
computing. Computer terminals that provide access to the mainframe are available 
throughout the campus. 

CAREER PLANNING AND PLACEMENT 

The division along with the Career Planning and Placement Center assists students in 
understanding their career interests and aptitudes and helps them develop programs of 
study that will lead to various career opportunities. 

Internships and Cooperative Education enable qualified students to acquire valuable 
work experience in conjunction with their studies. Both programs help students refine 
their career goals. 



225 



To enhance students' employment opportunities following graduation, the division and 
the Career Planning and Placement Center work closely with businesses and governmental 
representatives. Workshops are provided to students on a regular basis on interviewing, 
resume writing, and job search skills. Graduates find employment in commercial, account- 
ing, financial and industrial establishments in the local area and throughout the nation. 

CURRICULA 

The division is organized into two departments: Accounting, and Economics and Busi- 
ness. All of the Bachelor of Arts degrees offered by the division require 24 semester hours in 
common. This course work includes: EB 301 (microeconomics), EB 202 and 302 (macroeco- 
nomics), EB 350 (statistics), CSC 200 (computer science), and 9 semester hours of depart- 
mental electives. The departmental electives include courses offered by the division or 
other courses approved by the program leader prior to being taken. (Additionally, students 
complete the introductory microeconomics course, EB 201, as part of their social science 
requirement.) 

Beyond this common course work, students are required to take more specialized courses 
consistent with their degree program as outlined below. 

Double majors in business management and Spanish and business management and 
French are also available. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

All of the division's degree programs contain a substantial amount of course work as 
outlined below that is flexible and can be selected by the student with the aid of his or her 
adviser. Courses are available in such fields as: accounting, business management, econom- 
ics, agricultural economics, finance, business law, marketing, agricultural business, 
human resources and production. (Courses offered are listed in the Course Description 
portion of this catalog under the following headings: Accounting, Agricultural and 
Resource Economics, Business Management, and Economics.) 

DIVISION RESIDENCY REQUIREMENT 

To be eligible for a degree in the Division of Economics and Business, students must 
complete a minimum of 50 percent of the departmental course requirements above EB 201 
(212) and 202 in residency at NCSU. Additional requirements may exist for specific degree 
programs within the division. 

ACCOUNTING 

Professor C. J. Messere, Head of the Department 
KPMG Peat Marwick Professor: C. J. Messere 

Professors:?. W. Vi!\\\\a.Tn%; Professor Emeritus: ? . R. Windham; i4.s.sona<ePro/i?.s-.sor.s; J. W. Hartley. K. B. Frazier, J. M. 
Rockness, G.J. Zuckerman; Assistant Professors: F. A. Buckless, Y. A. Chen, R. L. Peace, J. L. Rodgers, R. B. Sawyers: 
Lecturers: E. R. Carraway, H. 0. Griffin, G. A. Marsh, C. J. Skender, L. B. Thorne. 

The Department of Accounting offers a Bachelor of Arts degree in accounting. Account- 
ing is an information system for measuring, processing and communicating financial 
information. This information allows users to make reasoned choices among alternative 
uses of scarce resources in the conduct of business activities. 

Many career opportunities are available to accountants in the fields of public accounting, 
management accounting, governmental accounting, and not-for-profit accounting. Public 
accountants offer auditing, tax preparation and planning, management consulting, and 
other accounting services to their clients on a fee basis. Management or industrial accoun- 
tants are employed by private businesses to provide internal accounting services for the 
firm. Their duties include the design and maintenance of the financial and cost accounting 
systems, product costing, budget preparation and operational auditing. Governmental 
units and other not-for-profit entities have informational needs similar to private busi- 



226 



nesses. Accountants employed by such entities perform many of the same functions. 
Accountants in some governmental agencies, such as the SEC. IRS and FBI, serve the dual 
function of auditing and law enforcement. 

Certified public accountants (CPAs), certified management accountants (CMAs), certi- 
fied internal auditors (CIAs) and certified cost analysts (CCAs) are individuals who, like 
doctors, dentists, and lawyers, are licensed to practice their profession. Such certifications 
are granted to those accountants who pass a qualifying examination and meet certain 
accounting experience and educational requirements. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ACCOUNTING 

In addition to the college and common course requirements described above, the Bache- 
lor of Arts degree in accounting includes 24 hours of accounting courses and a course in 
business law.^ 

Credits Credits 

ACC 210 Accounting I 3 ACC 450 Auditing Financial Information^ 3 

ACC 220 Accounting II 3 EB 307 Business Law I 3 

ACC 310 Intermediate Finan. Acct. I 3 Common Course Work 24 

ACC 311 IntermediateFinan.Acct.il 3 — 

ACC 320 Managerial Uses of Cost Data 3 ^^ 

ACC 330 Intro, to Income Taxation 3 „. . „ „ . ,, ^ , 

ACC 312 Intermediate Finan. Acct. Ill 3 Mmimum Hours Required for Graduation 124 

'To be eligible for a degree in accounting, at least 12 hours from the following required courses must be completed in 
residency at NCSU: ACC 310, 311, 312, 330, and 450^. 
^Or another approved 400 level accounting course. 

Beyond these minimum requirements, students should plan (with the aid of their adviser) to complete additional course 
work to fulfill the requirements of their career objectives. For example. CPA candidates should take ACC 430, 460. 470, 
490 and EB 308. CMA candidates should also take ACC 420. The additional course work plan is flexible and depends 
upon the student's background and career orientation. Some of these courses may be required or suggested by various 
professional certifying boards. The additional courses can be included in the curriculum categories labeled either 
"departmental" or "free" electives. In some cases, the additional course work will require either an extra semester or 
summer school attendance (i.e., in addition to the minimum 124 semester hours required for graduation). 

MINOR IN ACCOUNTING 

The Department of Accounting offers a minor in accounting to any undergraduate 
degree student outside the Division of Economics and Business. The accounting minor is 
offered to students interested in gaining a basic knowledge of accounting and an under- 
standing of how accounting information is used to make rational decisions by individuals, 
businesses, and society. The minor requires 15 hours of accounting courses and includes an 
introduction to financial, managerial, and tax accounting principles and practices. The 
minor is not intended to prepare students for a professional accounting career. Please 
consult the division for specific information about admission and other requirements. 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS 

Professor D. M. Holthausen, Associate Department Head for Business Management 
Professor D. Fisher, Associate Department Head for Economics 
University Distinguished Professor: V. K. Smith 

Professors: S. G. Allen. R. L. Clark. E. W. Erickson. R. M. Fearn. T. G. Grennes. J. D. Hess. D. N. Hyman. C. P. Jones. C. R. 
Knoeber. D. K. Pearce. J. J. Seater, V. K. Smith. C. B. Turner. J. W. Wilson: Adjunct Professor: J. B. Hunter. Jr.; 
Professors Emeriti: A.J. Bartley. D. R. Dixon, B. M. Olsen: /ls,sof(aff Professors: D. S. Ball, D. L. Baumer. J. C. Button, 
Jr.. D.J. Flath. E. Gerstner. A. R. Hall, J. S. Lapp. S. J. Liebowitz. S. E. Margolis. E, A. McDermed. M. B. McElroy. C. 
M. Newmark. R. B. Palmquist, J. C. Poindexter. Jr.. R. J. Rossana. R. R. Rucker. W. N. Thurman. W. J. Wessels: 
Associate Professor Emeriti: C. L. Harrell. Jr.: Assistant Professors: A. Agrawal. L. A. Craig. A. E. Headen. Jr.. R. S. 
Krishnaswamy. K. Mitchell. Y. E. Tang: Assistarit Professor Emeriti: 0. G. Thompson: Lecturers: J. M. Baumer. J. P. 
Huggard.C. B. Kimbrough, B. L. Puryeir: Associate Members of the Faculty: R.J. Bernhard (Industrial Engineering), 
D. A. Dickey (Statistics). 

The Department of Economics and Business offers Bachelor of Arts degrees in business 
management and economics and a Bachelor of Science degree in economics. Successful 



227 



completion of an undergraduate degree in economics or business management prepares a 
student for careers in business or government and for advanced education. Graduates have 
been actively recruited by employers seeking individuals with management potential and a 
well-rounded business education. A wide range of career opportunities are available to 
students in either program including: finance and banking, marketing, sales, manufactur- 
ing and production, personnel management and public administration. Students from 
either program have an excellent background for graduate work in economics, business, 
law and related fields. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

In addition to the college and common course requirements, the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in business management includes two courses in accounting and one course in each of three 
areas: business law, marketing, and finance. Business management majors also complete a 
two-course business concentration (see listing below) and two economics electives. 

Credits Credits 

ACC 210 Accounting I 3 Economics Electives^ 6 

ACC 220 Accounting II 3 Common Course Work ^ 

EB;W7 (or 306 or 405) Business Law I 3 ~^ 

EB :n3 Marketing Methods 3 

EB S20 Financial Management 3 Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 124 

Busmess Concentration' b 

'Select two courses from ONE of the following groups: Finance— EB 404, 420, 422, 504, 520. 522, 524: Managerial— EB 
■325. 425. 525. ACC 320; Labor and Personnel— EB 326 or 332 (choose one), AND EB 431. 526 or 532 (choose one): 
Agricultural Business-EB 303. 311, 415, 430: Accounting-ACC 320. 330, 420: Marketing-EB 460, 465, 495N, 513, 
560: International Business-EB 346. 448. 495N. 

^Selecttwocourses from the following: EB 370, 371. 404, 410. 413, 430, 431, 433. 435, 436, 437. 442, 448, 451. 470. 475. 490. 
.501. 502. 512, 51.5. ,521. 533, 540, 551, 570. 

MINOR IN BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

The Department of Economics and Business offers a minor in business management to 
undergraduate degree students outside the Division of Economics and Business. The 
business management minor is offered to students interested in gaining basic knowledge 
about business. Students will learn the fundamentals of accounting, marketing, and 
finance and will be able to enhance these areas with related courses or diversify by taking 
courses in other areas of business. To complete the minor, 15 hours of course work are 
required. Please consult the division for specific information about admission and other 
requirements. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ECONOMICS 

In addition to the college and common course requirements, the Bachelor of Arts degree 
in economics includes an additional 12 semester hours of departmental electives and 15 
additional hours of economics electives. This program requires that students take more 
advanced economics courses than are required in the other degree programs. These 
advanced courses are structured in an elective format to provide students the opportunity to 
design a program with the aid of their adviser that will best complement their educational 
or career objectives. 

Credits Credits 

Common Course Work 24 Economics Electives' 15 

Department Electives^ 12 T7 

ol 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 124 

'Courses are to be selected from the following: EB 370, 371, 404, 410, 413, 430, 431. 433, 435, 436, 437, 442, 448, 451. 470. 
475. 490, 501, 502. 512, 515, 521, .533. .540. 551. 570. 
*Any course offered by the division or other courses approved by the program leader prior to being taken. 



228 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ECONOMICS 

The Bachelor of Science degree in economics provides training in the analytical methods 
and the body of knowledge of economic theory. This training is enhanced by the mathemat- 
ics, sciences, and technical courses that are integral parts of the B.S. program. 

Included in the economics program are 27 hours of prescribed and elected courses as 
outlined below: 

Credits Credits 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Their Uses 3 EB(ST)350 Economics & Business Stat.' 3 

EB 201 Economics I 3 Departmental Elective^ 3 

EB 202 Economics II 3 Economics Electives- 6 

27 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 127 



EB 301 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 

EB 302 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 



'ST 350, 361. or 372 mav substitute for EB 350. Credit will not be granted for more than one of these courses. 
^Select two courses from" the following: EB 370, 371, 404, 410, 413, 430, 431, 433. 435. 436, 437, 442, 448, 451, 470, 475. 490, 
501, 502, 512. 515, 521, 533, 540, 551, 570. 
^Any course offered by the division or other courses approved by the program leader prior to being taken. 

MINOR IN ECONOMICS 

The Department of Economics and Business offers a minor in economics to any under- 
graduate degree student outside the Division of Economics and Business. The minor is 
offered to students interested in learning to apply economics to contemporary problems. It 
is not intended to prepare students for a professional career in the field of econopiics but to 
provide a program of study leading to the basic comprehension of economics. To complete 
the minor 15 hours of course work are required. Please consult the division for specific 
information about admission and other requirements. 



ENGLISH 

Tompkins Hall (Rooms 131, 246) 

Professor J. E. Bassett, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor C. A. Prioli, Associate Head of the Department 

Associate Professor C. E. Moore, Assistant Head for Scheduling 

Senior Lecturer P. R. Cockshutt, Coordinator of Advising 

Professor W. E. Meyers, Director of Freshman Program 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: L. S. Champion, M. T. Hester, A. S. 
Knowles, Jr. 

Professors: B. J. Baines. J. E. Bassett, P. E. Blank, Jr., L. S. Champion, J. D. Durant, J. A. Gomez, A. H. Harrison, M. T. 
Hester, L. T. Hollev, K. F. Holloway, A. S. Knowles. L. H. MacKethan, W. E. Meyers, C. R. Miller, M. S. Reynolds, L. 
Smith. J. J. Smoot. A. F. Stein. W. B. Toole. III. J. N. Wall, M. C. Williams, R. V. Young, Jr.: Adjunct Professor: D. D. 
Short: Professors Emeriti: M. Halperen. H. G. Kincheloe. B. G. Koonce, F. H. Moore, P. Williams, Jr.; Associate 
Pro/e.s.sors.G.W. Barrax. L.J. Betts. Jr., E.D.Clark, J. W.Clark, Jr.. D.H.Covington, J. Ferster. J. M.Grimwood.H. A. 
Hargrave, J. J. Kessel. M. F. King, D. L. Laryea, C. E. Moore. C. A. Prioli, L. S. Rudner. H. C. West, D. B. Wyrick: 
Adjunct Associate Professor: E. D. Engel: Associate Professors Emeriti: E. P. Dandridge, Jr., P. H. Davis. J. B. Easley. 

A. B. R. Sheilev. N. G. Smith: Assistant Professors: E.T. Amiran. M. M. Brandt, M. P. Carter, C. E. Chaski, V. C. Downs, 

B. A. Fennell, C. Gross. W. E. Haskin, C. G. Herndl, M. G. Huskey, S. B. Katz. R. C. Kochersberger. R. C. Lane, D. C. 
Miller, J. E. Morrison, M. E. Orr, A. M. Penrose, J. 0. Pettis, N. B. Rich, L. R. Severin, J. J. Small. J. F. Thompson, J. M. 
Unsworth: Adjunct Assistant Professor: S. K. Burton; Senior Lecturer: P. R. Cockshutt: Lecturers: G. G. Acuff, D. H. 
Ball, C. Blankenship. R. D. Botvinick, T. B. Burgin. L. J. Caruso, A. Davis-Gardner, H. E. Dickerson, S. A. Drucker, 
E. N. Evasdaughter, C. R. Frazier. J. Gaitens, H. J. Gray. S. H. Jobe, A. B, Katz, R. S. Knott. E. H. Koomen. R. E. 
Lathan. M. M. Lewis, J. Love. N. H. Margolis, E. McDaniel. C. L. McKnight, T. R. McLaurin, K. F. Merris, K. A. 
Oiander. P. Pienkowski, D. P. Real, J. H. Richards. S. M. Setzer. 



229 



The Department of English offers basic and advanced courses in writing, language, and 
literature. The freshman courses, taken by all undergraduate students, develop skill in 
expository writing and in analytical reading of literary and non-literary works. Advanced 
courses in communication of technical information, composition and rhetoric, and creative 
writing give students opportunities to pursue special personal and career interests, as do 
courses in literature, linguistics, film, and folklore. The department offers a Bachelor of 
Arts major in English with three options— literature and language, writing and editing, 
and teacher certification— and a Bachelor of Science major. See listing of graduate degrees 
offered. 

A certificate in professional writing is available to students not seeking the bachelor's 
degree. Also available are a minor in English, a minor in Comparative Literature (offered 
jointly with the Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures), a minor in Second 
Language Acquisition (offered jointly with the Department of Foreign Languages and 
Literatures), and a minor in Journalism (offered jointly with the Departn^ent of Communi- 
cation). An internship program combines work experience with courses in writing and 
editing. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

A degree in English provides both vocational training and liberal education. It leads to 
careers in such fields as teaching, journalism, advertising, public relations, personnel 
management, technical writing, business writing, and creative writing. It sharpens the 
analytical and interpretive skills needed for strong business management, and it serves as 
an excellent pre-professional degree for students planning to study law or medicine and for 
those intending to do graduate work in literature and composition. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Major in English— The student must schedule 42 semester hours beyond the usual six 
hours in freshman composition. Basic requirements include the sophomore survey of 
English literature, the sophomore survey of American literature, a course in Shakespeare, 
and a seminar in literary criticism. Beyond these courses, the student may pursue special 
interests within the limits of recommended categories. 

Major in English, Writing and Editing Option— The student must schedule 39 semes- 
ter hours beyond the usual six hours in freshman composition. Courses include journalism, 
copyediting, advanced writing, literature, and, in the final semester, a seminar in writing- 
editing (ENG 495). Additionally the student must schedule 15-18 semester hours in a 
chosen track or discipline outside the department. 

Major in English, Teacher Education Option— English majors may enroll in the 
teacher education option offered by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences in 
cooperation with the College of Education and Psychology. Students who complete this 
program are eligible to apply for certification to teach English in secondary schools in 
North Carolina. The requirements of the program include 34 semester hours in profes- 
sional courses and 33 semester hours in English beyond the usual six hours in freshman 
composition. (Total 127 credit hours required for graduation.) Students desiring to enter 
this program should declare their intention before the spring of the sophomore year and are 
required to file a formal application for admission which must be approved in order for 
them to participate. Enrollments in the Teacher Education Option may be limited. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN ENGLISH 

Concentration in English— The student, in consultation with his or her department 
adviser, must schedule 27 semester hours beyond the usual six hours in freshman 
composition. 



230 



MINOR IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

The Departments of English and of Foreign Languages and Literatures offer a minor in 
Comparative Literature to all undergraduate students. It requires six courses: FL 350 or 
ENG 590, CL 495. and four courses, in one or more literatures (other than a student's 
major), chosen from an approved list. A grade of C or better is required in all courses. 

MINOR IN ENGLISH 

The English Department offers a minor in English to majors in any field except English. 
To complete the minor fifteen hours of English courses are required above the 100 level, six 
hours of which must be at the 300 level or above. A grade of C or better is required in all 
courses credited to the English minor. 

MINOR IN FILM STUDIES 

(See Communication) 

MINOR IN JOURNALISM 

With the Department of Communication, the Department of English offers a minor in 
Journalism, open to students in anv major. It consists of the following courses: ENG 214, 
ENG 215, ENG 315, COM (SP) 204, and one of the following— COM (SP) 234, COM (SP) 334, 
COM (SP) 421. A grade of C or better is required in all courses. 

MINOR IN LINGUISTICS 

The Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures and the Department of English 
offer a minor in Linguistics to majors in any field. Among students likely to be attracted to 
the minor are those interested in Second Language Acquisition. To complete the minor 
fifteen hours of designated courses are required, as well as the completion of a foreign 
language through the 202 level. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES AND 
LITERATURES 

1911 Building (Room 120) 

Professor J. H. Stewart, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor k. C. Malinowski, Assistant Head of the DepaHment and Coordinator of 
Advising 

Professor G. G. Smith, Scheduling Officer 

Professors: T. P. Feeny, G. Gonzalez. J. R. Kelly, M. Paschal. G. G. Smith, J. H. Stewart. M. A. Witt: Professors Emeriti- 
A. A. Gonzalez. G. W. Poland. E. M. Stack. H. Tucker. Jr.: Associate Professors: R. A. Alder. S. T. Alonso, L. L. Cofresi, 
T. N. Hammond, W. M. Holler, M. M. Magill. A. C. Malinowski. L. A. Mykyto. V. M. Prichard. E. W. Rollins. Y. B. 
Rollins. S. E. Simonsen: Assistant Professors: J . C. Akers. H. G. Braunbeck. G. A. Dawes. M. L. Salstad. M. L. Sosower, 
W. G. Tschacher: Visiting Assistaitt Professor: S. Yamahashi: Lecturers: D. G. Adler. A. B. Kennedy: Instructors: V. 
Bilenkin. D. M. Marchi. J. P. Mertz. G. P. Meyjes. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

Languages are the keys to the world. The continuous expansion of international relations 
makes the knowledge of foreign languages a critical need for today's professional. The 
student of foreign languages is not limited to teaching, translating or interpreting. There 
are careers in politics, diplomacy, commerce, banking, agriculture, science, and research 



231 



in which a thorough knowledge of foreign languages is crucial for success. The demand for 
multilingual personnel extends to all fields of human enterprise and will continue to grow 
in the coming years. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN FRENCH OR SPANISH 

All the general requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree must be met. including six 
hours of literature survey within the Department of Foreign Languages and Literaturesor 
in British and American literature or any combination of these. Degree designations are: 
B.A. in French Language and Literature. B.A. in Spanish Language and Literature. B.A. 
in French Language and Literature with Teacher Education option, and B.A. in Spanish 
Language and Literature with Teacher Education option. 

Outstanding students may become members of Alpha Lambda, campus chapter of Phi 
Sigma Iota. National Foreign Languages Honor Society: of Xi Omicron, campus chapter of 
Sigma Delta Pi. National Hispanic Honor Society: and of Gamma Alpha, campus Chapter 
of Dobro Slovo. National Slavic Honor Society. 

Major in French or Spanish— Students must complete 36 hours beyond the 201 level, 
including a senior seminar. Majors must take 12 additional hours of advised electives. 
These are waived for double majors such as Business and Spanish or Business and French. 

Double Major in Business Management and Spanish or French— The B.A. degree 
double major in Business Management and Spanish or French is a curriculum sponsored 
by the Department of Economics and Business and the Department of Foreign Languages 
and Literatures. Students enrolled in this program have the opportunity to complete the 
139 hours required for both majors within a four-year period. 

Major in French or Spanish with Teacher Education Option— In collaboration with 
the College of Education and Psychology' and the Department of Curriculum and Instruc- 
tion, the department offers a program leading to French or Spanish teacher certification in 
North Carolina, grades K-12. The requirements of the program include 30 semester hours 
in professional courses and 39 semester hours in French or Spanish beyond the 102 level. 
Candidates must consult with their academic adviser as early as possible for the proper 
planning of their curriculum. Application for admission to Teacher Education Candidacy 
is made during the spring semester of the sophomore year. Enrollment in the Teacher 
Education Option programs may be limited. 

Programs Abroad— The department offers summer programs in Austria, France, 
Mexico and Germany, and a semester-long program in Spain. 

MINOR IN CLASSICAL STUDIES 

The minor in Classical Studies offers an excellent foundation for advanced work in other 
academic disciplines as well as professional programs in law, medicine and finance. The 
minor gives students an opportunity to develop a keener perception and better understand- 
ing of the cultural forces at work in the contemporary world. And by presenting a broad 
selection of courses in the various disciplines of literature, philosophy and history, the 
minor provides students with a sound introduction to studies in antiquity. Requirements for 
the minor include five courses selected from the following: GRK 201 or LAT 201: GRK 310 
or GRK 320: PHI 300 or REL 312: HI 403 or HI 404: and HI 405 or HI 406. 

MINOR IN COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

(See English Department) 

MINORS IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES, LITERATURES, AND CULTURES 

Minor programs in French, German, Italian, Japanese, Russian, and Spanish involve 
fifteen hours of study at the 201 level and beyond. A minor program in Classical Greek is 
also offered that involves fifteen hours of study at the 101 level and beyond. Programs 
include courses in language, literature, and civilization. Students majoring in any area of 



232 



study at NCSU are eligible to minor in a foreign language. Students may not, however, 
major and minor in the same language. 

MINOR IN LINGUISTICS 

(See English Department) 



HISTORY 

Harrelson Hall (Room 162) 

Professor W. C. Harris, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor J. E. Crisp, Assistant Head of the Department 

Associate Professor J. A. Mulholland, Coordinator of Advising 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: B. F. Beers, J. P. Hobbs 

Professors: J. R. Banker. B. F. Beers. W. H. Beezlev. C. H. Carlton, A.J. DeGrand, M. S. Downs, W. C. Harris, J. P. Hobbs, 
D. E. King. A. J. LaVopa. L. 0. McMurry. G. D. Newby. J. M. Riddle, R. H. Sack, R. W. Slatta. E. D. Sylla. B. W. Wishy: 
Professors Emeriti.M. L. Brown, R. W. Greenlaw. L. W. Seegers. M. E. Wheeler; Associate Professors: D. P. Gilmartin, 
J. A. Mulholland. G. W. O'Brien. J. K. Ocko. S. T. Parker. J. D. Smith, S. L. Spencer. G. D. Surh. K. P. Vickery, K. S. 
Vincent: Associate Professor Emeritus: R. N. Elliott; Assistant Professors: J. E. Crisp, W. A. Jackson. W. C. Kimler, 
K. P. Luria. S. Middleton, P. Tyler; Adjunct Assistant Professors: V. L. Berger. J. W. Caddell. J. J. Crow, R. M. 
McMurry. W. S. Price. Jr., D. J. Olson. H. K. Steen; Associate Status: J. Bonham (MDS); Instructor: J. Woodard. 

An understanding of the historical background of our times is expected of the educated 
person. The Department of History makes it possible for students to gain this understand- 
ing through a wide range and variety of courses at all levels from introductory through 
graduate. 

A broad offering of introductory courses is available to satisfy the undergraduate history 
requirement or part of the humanities and social sciences requirements in most university 
curricula. Students in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences are required to take 
two courses in history — one dealing with a culture significantly different from our own in 
pre-industrial Western or non-Western societies and the other dealing with our own culture 
in the United States or post-industrial Western societies. 

Honors students are eligible for membership in Phi Alpha Theta. 

Some introductory and advanced courses and most graduate courses are offered in the 
evening. 

The department offers two Master of Arts degrees. Students interested in enhancing 
current teaching credentials or in going on to doctoral work elsewhere may take the 
traditional graduate program. Students interested in applied history may take the Archi- 
val Management program. Some financial assistance is available. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

A history major has traditionally served as a foundation for careers in such professions as 
teaching or law. In recent years undergraduates have frequently augmented studies in 
history with computer science, foreign language, or business administration, combinations 
which have proved attractive in business and government service. The prospect of new 
career ladders in public education has prompted renewed interest in an M.A. in history 
with advanced teaching certification. Multiplication of records of every kind has created a 
steady demand for historians with master's degrees in archival management. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

Major in History — A history major must take 30 hours of course work in history in 
addition to the six hours required of all students in the College of Humanities and Social 



233 



Sciences. These 30 hours must include a 491 seminar. At least 24 hours of the 30 must be at 
the 400 level. Sufficient courses are offered to complete the history requirements for the 
B. A. through the evening program. ^ . tt- 

Major in History with Social Studies Teacher Education Option— History majors 
may enroll in the teacher education program offered by the College of Humanities and 
Social Sciences in cooperation with the College of Education and Psychology. Students who 
complete this program are eligible for certification to teach social studies in secondary 
school in North Carolina. In addition to Bachelor of Arts degree requirements, students are 
required to take professional courses in education and psychology and additional social 
sciences courses (132 credit hours required for graduation). Students desiring to enter this 
program should declare their intention during their sophomore year. Admission is compet- 
itive and the criteria include an overall grade point average of 2.5 or better. Enrollments 
may be limited in Teacher Education Option Programs. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN HISTORY 

A concentration in history involves 18 hours of course work beyond the six hours required 
of all students in the College of Humanities and Social Sciences plus a senior seminar. Of the 
18 hours, at least 12 must be at the 400 level. 

MINOR IN HISTORY 

A minor in history shall consist of six courses in history: one introductory course in 
preindustrial or non-Western history (i.e.. HI 207. 208. 209. 215. 216. 263, 264, 275. or 276); 
one introductory course in United States or post-industrial Western history (i.e.. HI 205. 
210. 221, 222. 233, 243, 244, 251 or 252): four three-hour courses in history at the 300 level or 
above, two of which must be on the 400 level. All six courses must be completed with a grade 
of C or better to satisfy the requirements of the minor. 



MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Harrelson Hall (Room 144) 

Professor J. W. Wilson. Head 

Professor C. D. Korte, Assistant Head 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: J. W. Wilson 

Profexsors: D. A. Adams, J. A. Gomez. D. B. Greene. C. D. Korte, J. W. Wilson; Professors Emeriti: A. C. Barefoot, 
J. R. Lambert. Jr.: Associate Professors: T. N. Hammond, R. L. Hoffman; Assistant Professor: J. C. Bonham, B. 
H. Grimes. R. E. Rice. R. A. Wasehka, H; Lecturers: E. Malloy-Hanley. C. L. Stalnaker. 

Multidisciplinary Studies is an academic unit responsible for interdisciplinary pro- 
grams dealing with contemporary and historical issues and problems. Courses are taught 
by teams of faculty drawn from the division and from the academic disciplines relating to 
the problems or issues under consideration. These courses are open without prerequisite to 
students in all curricula. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDIES 

Multidisciplinary Studies Committee 
Professor J. W. Wilson (Multidisciplinary Studies), Chair 
Associate Professor L. M. Antony (Philosophy and Religion) 
Lecturer C. B. Kimbrough (Economics and Business) 



234 



Associate Professor A. C. Malinowski (Foreign Languages and Literatures) 
Assistant Professor R. S. Moog (Political Science and Public Administration) 

The multidisciplinary studies program allows a student to design his or her own aca- 
demic major. Instead of following the requirements for a major in one of the traditional 
disciplines, the candidate for the Bachelor of Arts degree in multidisciplinary studies has 
the responsibility of organizing a concentration or field specialization from tivo or more 
disciplines. A concentration in Latin American Studies might, for example, combine 
related courses in language, literature, history, economics, sociology, and political science. 

Two concentrations have been established primarily for the benefit of evening students. 
These are 1) American Studies: Cultural, Social, and Political and 2) Business Organization 
and Communication. All courses required for completion of these concentrations will be 
available in the evening. 

The freshman and sophomore basic requirements for the multidisciplinary studies pro- 
gram are the same as for the other Bachelor of Arts programs in humanities and social 
sciences. In satisfying basic requirements in language, humanities, social science, mathe- 
matics, and natural science, the student should, whenever possible, choose those courses 
that are most appropriate as background for the courses in his or her major concentration. 

Admission to the Program 

To become a candidate for a major in multidisciplinary studies, a student first secures 
application forms and information from the office of the chair of the Multidisciplinary 
Studies Committee (144 Harrelson), then prepares a tentative proposal which includes a list 
of courses comprising 30 credit hours and an essay of 300-500 words explaining his or her 
reasons for desiring to make this set of courses the field of specialization. The student's 
proposal is reviewed by a faculty sponsor and submitted to the Multidisciplinary Commit- 
tee for consideration. After a thorough examination to determine whether the set of courses 
proposed as a multidisciplinary major is academically sound and coherent, the committee 
will recommend that the Dean of Humanities and Social Sciences accept the proposal; or it 
will be sent back to the student and his or her sponsor with suggestions for modification and 
resubmission. 

MINOR IN AFRICAN-AMERICAN STUDIES 

The African-American Studies Minor provides a comparative and interdisciplinary 
study of the Black experience in Africa and the Americas. Three required courses include 
an introduction to African- American studies (MDS (UNI) 240), Black American literature 
(ENG 248), and Afro-American history (HI 372 or 373). Two elective courses may be 
selected from a list of designated courses in such disciplines as anthropology, history, 
language, sociology, social work, and communication. The minor is designed to bring 
together students from diverse backgrounds and curricula who share a common interest in 
the African-American experience. 

MINOR IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

Provides opportunity for non-science majors to acquire basic understanding of interrela- 
tionships between humans and the environment. Includes natural and social science 
courses that help to integrate disciplines and provide the foundation for analyzing envir- 
onmental issues. 

MINOR IN FILM STUDIES 

(See Communication) 

MINOR IN SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND SOCIETY 

The Science, Technology, and Society minor is a fifteen hour, multidisciplinary minor 
providing students an opportunity to appreciate and understand better the roles that 



235 



science and technology play in the larger sociocultural context. A goal of the minor is to help 
students develop the ability to order and integrate the diverse aspects of their educations. 
Two essential components of this ability are sensitivity to the moral dimensions of scientific, 
and technological inquiry as affecting how people may live or want to live, and an apprecia- 
tion of the practical implications of scientific and technical theory. In addition, the Science. 
Technolog>'. and Society minor enables students to increase the breadth of their familiarity 
with science and technology. 

MINOR IN WOMEN'S STUDIES 

The Women's Studies minor offers all students in the university the opportunity to study 
the role of women in society. The minor will enable students to develop a better understand- 
ing of how women's positions in various societies have arisen and evolved. 



PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Winston Hall (Room 101) 

Professor E. A. Martin, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor L. M. Antony, Assistant Head of the Department 

Professor A. D. Van DeVeer, Coordinator of Advising 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: W. R. Carter, T. H. Regan 

Professors: W. R. Carter, E. A, Martin, T. H. Regan, J. C. VanderKam, A. D. VanDeVeer; Professor Evieriti: P. A. 
Bredenberg, R. S. Bryan; Associate Professors: L. M. Anthony, D. F. Austin, W. C. Fitzgerald. R. M. Hambourger, B. B. 
Levenbook. H. D. Levin, J. Levine, C. M. Pierce; Associate Professors Emeriti: W. L. Highfill, R. S. Metzger; Assistant 
Professors: W. Adler. D. D. Auerbach. M. K. Cunningham, R. B. Muiiin. A. Reath. T. K. Stewart; Associate Member of 
the Department: G. D. Newby (History). C. L. Stalnaker (Multidiscipiinary Studies). 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion at North Carolina State University renders 
two major services to its students. 1) In the discipline of philosophy, it offers an array of 
courses which examine the great philosophic ideas of western civilization, and in the 
discipline of religion, it offers courses which examine the religious concepts and principles 
that have had an impact on all of civilization. 2) It provides an opportunity for extensive 
technical study in philosophy for students who wish to concentrate in this field either for its 
own sake or as an ideal intellectual foundation for subsequent graduate or professional 
study. 

HONORS PROGRAMS IN PHILOSOPHY 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion offers an Honors Program to provide an 
opportunity for qualified students to pursue a more challenging and individualized course 
of study. 

Students who qualify may elect to take as little as one course on an honors basis. However, 
those students who desire to enroll in the honors program and to have their transcripts 
include the words, "With Honors in Philosophy," are required (a) to complete a major in 
philosophy, and (b) to complete satisfactorily a minimum of fifteen hours (including Philo- 
sophy 335) of honors work. Students pursuing these goals will be referred to as "students 
seeking honors in philosophy." 

HONORS PROGRAM IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

The Department of Philosophy and Religion offers an Honors Program in Religious 
Studies to provide an opportunity for qualified students to pursue a more challenging, 
individualized, and directed course of study than that afforded by the general Area of 
Concentration in Religious Studies. 

236 



Students who qualify may elect to take as little as one course on an honors basis. However, 
those students who desire to enroll in the honors program and to have their transcripts 
include the words, "With Honors in Religious Studies" are required to (a) complete the 
degree program for Philosophy with an Area of Concentration in Religious Studies; and (b) 
to complete a minimum of twelve credit hours of honors work in Religious Studies. Students 
pursuing these goals will be referred to as "students seeking honors in religious studies." 

SCHOLARSHIP 

The Claire Simmons Allan-Samson Memorial Scholarship in Moral Philosophy, a 
renewable scholarship of $1000 per year, will be awarded annually to worthy students who 
have expressed an interest in issues in animal rights. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

For students interested in postgraduate study, information compiled by post-college 
professional schools reveals that undergraduate philosophy majors who apply to graduate 
schools of management have in the past scored extremely well in combined total scores on 
the Graduate Management Admission Test, with exceptional scores on verbal fields. Those 
undergraduate philosophy majors who apply to law schools have been shown to be more 
likely to be admitted than virtually any other field represented, and medical schools have 
also shown a significant preference for philosophy majors in their admissions. Students 
intending to study philosophy in graduate programs have consistently scored much higher 
than other students on the verbal section of the Graduate Record Examination. Because of 
this capability of scoring so well on the various postgraduate tests, many businesses and 
industries welcome philosophy majors into their training programs. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy must complete 30 hours in 
philosophy, including either Logic (PHI 201) or Symbolic Logic (PHI 335); the courses in 
the development of western philosophic thought (PHI 300, 301), a course in value theory 
(PHI 275, 308, 309, 311, 312, 313, 314, 321, 322) and a course in contemporary philosophy 
(PHI 319, 331, 332). 

Major in Philosophy with a Concentration in Religious Studies— This program is 
designed especially to prepare students for theological seminary or graduate work in 
religion as well as to introduce them to the discipline of religious studies. Candidates for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree in philosophy with a concentration in religious studies must 
complete 33 hours, including 12 hours in philosophy and 21 hours in religion. The courses in 
philosophy must include a course in the development of western philosophic thought (PHI 
300. 301); a course in value theory (PHI 275, 308, 309, 311, 312, 313, 314, 321, 322); and the 
course in the philosophy of religion (PHI 305). The courses in religion must include a course 
in biblical studies (RE L 201, 311, 312); a course in non-western religions (REL 331. 332, 407, 
408); a course in the history of western religion (REL 317, 318, 320, 323, 324, 326); and a 
course in theology and culture (REL 309, 327). 

Major in Philosophy with a Concentration in Philosophy of Law— The program is 
designed to help students develop the ability to think critically about the role of the law and 
the values that it reflects. Because of its interdisciplinary nature, it provides a strong 
foundation for professional legal education. The concentration requires a minimum of 30 
hours in philosophy (including the course taken to meet school requirements) and a mini- 
mum of 9 hours in political science. Three advised electives are required in addition to five 
core courses: PHI 309, PHI 312, PHI 313, PS 308 and PS 361. Four background courses, 
which are required of all philosophy majors, must also be taken: either PHI 201 or PHI 335, 
PHI 300, PHI 301, and either PHI 319, PHI 331, or PHI 332. 



237 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHILOSOPHY 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree in philosophy must complete 27 hours in 
philosophy. These must include the courses in the history of western philosophic thought 
(PHI300 301), Symbolic Logic (PHI 335), Philosophy of Science (PHI 340); and a course in 
value theory (PHI 275, 308, 309, 311, 312. 313, 314. 321. 322). 

MINORS IN THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION 

Students wishing to take any of the following academic minors need to complete the 
departmental form declaring intention to do so. 

MINOR IN COGNITIVE SCIENCE 

Students who take a minor program in cognitive science are required to complete with a 
grade of C or better fifteen hours of courses, distributed as follows: PSY 320 (Cognitive 
Processes); PSY 340 (Environmental Ergonomics); or PSY 545 (Human Information Pro- 
cessing); PHI 331 (Philosophy of Language); PHI 332 (Philosophy of Psychology); PHI/PSY 
425/525 (Introduction to Cognitive Science). 

MINOR IN PHILOSOPHY 

Students who take a minor program in philosophy are required to complete with a grade 
of C or better fifteen hours of courses in selected fields in philosophy, including (A) a course 
in the history of philosophy (3 credit hours). (B) a course in normative (ethics and ethics- 
related) philosophy (3 credit hours), (C) a course other than one in normative philosophy, but 
not including logic or the history of philosophy (3 credit hours). 

MINOR IN RELIGIOUS STUDIES 

Students who take a minor program in religious studies are required to complete with a 
grade of C or better fifteen hours of courses in selected fields of religious studies. In order to 
ensure a wide study of the field, students are required to select at least one course in 
Western religious traditions and at least one course in non-Western religious traditions. 
REL 101 and REL 102 may not be counted in the minor. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Carmichael Gymnasium (Room 2000) 
Professor A. Lumpkin, Head of the Department 

ProfesKorx: A. Lumpkin; Professor Emeritus: F. R. Drews, R. A. Lauffer; Associate Professors: A. L. Berle, H. L. Brown. J. 
M. Daniels. T. W. Evans. C. E. Patch, J. L. Shannon, W. H. Sonner; Associate Professors Emeriti: N. E. Cooper, J. B. 
Edwards, A. M. Hoch, H. Keating, W. R. Leonhardt; Assistant Professors: S. V. Almekinders, A. Attarian, J. V. 
Brothers, W. A. Cheek, R. C. Combs, K. L. Davis, J. L. Dewitt. R. G. Gwyn, S. C. Halstead, S. R. Hawkes. J. W. Isenhour, 
Jr.. V. M. Leath, G. W. Pollard, M. S. Rhodes, T. C. Roberts, R. R. Smith, J. W. Stewart: Assistant Professors Emeriti: W. 
M. Shea. E. A. Smaltz; Lecturers: J. K. Bartlett. Ill, R. N. Bechtolt, J. R. Bonner, D. S. Clark, K. K. Criswell, J. R. 
Harkins. J, R. Kascenska, R. H. Kidd, M. R. Lester, L F. Ormond, D. L. Peterson, C. E. Raynor, D. A. Rice, E. V. Smith. 
R. H. Taylor, G. E. Wall, T. C. Winslow, G. R. Youtt; Associate Members of the Faculty: D. L. Ridgeway (SUtistics and 
Physics), and M. M. Turnbull (Health Services). 

All North Carolina State University students are required to complete four semesters of 
physical education to meet graduation requirements. Freshmen are expected to take PE 
100. Health and Physical Fitness, ineitherthefallorthespringsemesteroftheirfreshman 
year. Students who do not pass a survival swimming test must enroll in and attempt to pass 
a beginning swim class. 

Students may participate in a known sport or learn a totally new activity while selecting 
their other courses. Students with disabling conditions will be helped by physical education 



238 



and Student Health Service professionals in choosing appropriate classes. Only "activity" 
courses, not elective "theory" courses, can be used to meet the university physical education 
requirement. 

MINOR IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION (COACHING EMPHASIS) 

The Department of Physical Education offers an 18-hour minor in Physical Education 
(Coaching Emphasis), designed to prepare students to assume coaching responsibilities 
with a sound theoretical background. The minor provides knowledge of pertinent anatomi- 
cal, physiological, and biomechanical principles; appreciation for the prevention and 
treatment of athletic injuries; development of observation and communication skills; and 
demonstration of motor skills and strategies involved in coaching specific sports. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE AND 
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

Caldwell Hall (Room 211) 

Professor M. S. Soroos, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor H. G. Kebschull, Assistant Head and Coordinator of Advising 

Professor J. H. Svara, Director of Master of Public Affairs Program 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: A. Holtzman, J. P. Mastro 

Professors: E. S. Fairchild, G. D. Garson. A. Holtzman, E. R, Rubin. M. S. Soroos. J. H. Svara, D. W. Stewart, J. 0. 
Williams; Professors Emeriti: W. J. Block, J. T. Caldwell; Associate Professor Emeriti: K. S. Petersen; Associate 
Professors: C. K. Coe, D. M. Daley. R. H. Dorff. J. H. Gilbert, H. G. Kebschull, S. H. Kessler, J. P. Mastro. J. M. McClain, 
E. O'SulIivan. T. V. Reid, J. E. Swiss. M. L. Vasu; Assistatit Professor: C. E. Griffin. R. S. Moog. 

The Department of Political Science and Public Administration offers basic and 
advanced courses in all major fields of the discipline: American government and politics 
(local, state, and national), public law and criminal justice, public administration, compar- 
ative politics, international relations and global issues, political theory and methodology of 
political science. The department affords opportunities for the study of government and 
administration to students in other curricula and schools. 

Graduate courses in political science are available to advanced undergraduates. See 
listing of graduate degree programs and consult the Graduate Catalog. 

The department provides opportunities for internships in state and local government 
including the North Carolina General Assembly Legislative Internship Program. 

Majors in political science with distinguished academic achievements are annually 
invited to join Zeta Epislon Chapter of Pi Sigma Alpha, the national political science honor 
society. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

There are a number of careers and professions for which a major in political science, or 
extensive study of government and politics, can be most useful. This is true especially for 
those planning to seek careers in teaching, the legal profession, criminal justice agencies, 
state and local government, urban planning, the federal bureaucracy, journalism or in any 
of the organizations that seek to monitor political processes or to influence the content of 
public policy. Private firms also seek managers and public affairs specialists who have a 
knowledge of the functioning of the political system and of politics in general. 



239 



BACHELOR OF ARTS IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Major requirements are: 30 hours (in addition to any political science course which may 
be taken to satisfy the 12-hour social science requirement), 21 of which must be at the 
300-level or above; PS 201 or equivalent; at least six hours in each of three pairs of subf ields 
(Pair A: American Politics/Policy and Administration; Pair B: International or Compara- 
tive Politics; Pair C: Political Theory/Scope and Methods); and a Political Science Seminar 
(indicated by the letter "S" following its number, or by the word "seminar" in its title). 

Criminal Justice Option— The Departments of Political Science and Public Adminis- 
tration and Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work offer undergraduate majors an 
option in criminal justice. This option includes 28 semester hours of specialized study. The 
program develops students who may move into middle management and policy making 
positions in agencies such as police, court, correctional, probation and parole agencies. 

Students interested in criminal justice should contact Dr. Eva R. Rubin, 223 Caldwell 
Hall, Political Science and Public Administration or Dr. Matthew Zingraff, 312 1911 
Building. Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work. 

Law and Political Philosophy Concentration— The concentration in law and political 
philosophy is an interdisciplinary program designed for students who are interested in the 
theoretical and legal dimensions of political life. It seeks to develop a broad understanding 
of the relationship between law and politics and the moral and philosophical questions 
which are central to both. The law and political philosophy concentration is fulfilled by 
successful completion of twelve hours of coi-e course requirements, nine hours of recom- 
mended electives, and completion of the normal political science major requirements. Six 
hours of the core course requirements and at least three hours of the recommended electives 
will be taken in the Department of Philosophy and Religion. Courses in the concentration 
provide a humanistic perspective on legal and political questions. The program is suitable 
for those interested in a career in law or government or those who hope to pursue graduate 
studies in either political science or philosophy. 

Social Studies Teacher Education Option— A major in political science may also 
choose a teacher education option. This is a 131-credit hour degree program which includes 
the normal 30-hour major plus the required professional education courses. Successful 
completion of the program leads to certification to teach social studies in the secondary 
schools. Enrollments may be limited in Teacher Education Option program. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The major requirements for a B.S. degree in political science are identical to the B.A. 
except that 27 hours of course work in the discipline are required instead of 30. 

MINOR IN POLITICAL SCIENCE 

A minor in political science may be elected by students from any curriculum. The minor 
requires 15 hours of political science courses, which must include 9 hours at the 300-level or 
above and a 400-level seminar course (indicated by the letter "S" following the number or 
the word seminar in its title). At least three hours must be from each of two of the following 
three pairs of subfields (Pair A: American Politics/Policy and Administration; Pair B: 
International or Comparative Politics; Pair C: Political Theory/Social Science Methods). 



240 



SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND 
SOCIAL WORK 

(Also see Agriculture and Life Sciences) 

1911 Building (Room 301) 

Professor L. B. Otto, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor M. P. Atkinson, Associate Head, CHASS Teaching and Research 

Professor W. B. Clifford, Associate Head, CALS Teaching and Research 

Professor E. M. Crawford, Graduate Administrator 

Associate Professor G. D. Hill, Undergraduate Administrator 

SOCIOLOGY TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Profensors: W. B. Clifford, E. M. Crawford. L. R. Delia Fave, V. A. Hiday, R. L, Moxley, L. B. Otto, M. M. Sawhney. M. D. 
Schulman. R. C. Wimberley; Adjunct Professor: R. D. Mustian; Professors Emeriti: L. W. Drabick, C. P. Marsh, J. N. 
Young: Associate Professors:}A. P. Atkinson, R. C. Brisson.G. D. Hill, J. C. Leiter, R.J. Thomson, M. S.Thompson, D.T. 
Tomaskovic-Devey. K. M. Troost. E. M. Woodrum, M. T. ZingrB.i{; Assista^it Professors: T. J. Hoban, P. L. McCall. M. L. 
Sehwalbe, A. E. Thompson, C. R. Zimmer; Assistant Professors Emeriti: C. G. Dawson. T. M. Hyman. 

SOCIOLOGY EXTENSION 

Associate Professor S. K. Garber, Specialist-in- Charge 

Professor Emeritus: M. E. Voland: Associate Professors: S. K. Garber. S. C. Liliey; AssiMant Professor: T. J. Hoban. 

ANTHROPOLOGY TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Associate Professor J. M. Wallace, Coordinator 

Associate Professors: G. S. Nickerson. I. Rovner. M. L. Walek; Associate Professor Emeritus: J. G. Peck; Assistant 
Professor: R. S. Ellovich. 

SOCIAL WORK TEACHING AND RESEARCH 

Associate Professor W. C. Peebles-Wilkins, Director 

Professor: R. N. Reid; Associate Professor: W. C. Peebles-Wilkins: Associate Professor Emeritus: I.E. Russell: Assistant 
Professor: J. S. Brown. L. A. Smith: Lecturer: L. R. Williams. 

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work offers introductory and 
advanced courses in sociology, anthropology, and social work covering the major sub-fields 
of the three disciplines. It also offers supervised field work and practicum experiences 
required for certain curricula in the department. 

Aims of the departmental offerings are: (1) To provide majors with academic background 
and experience useful for many careers in government and industry or for pursuing 
advanced academic work (for a description of the graduate degrees offered by the depart- 
ment, see the NCSU Graduate Catalog) and (2) To provide service courses to students in 
other curricula and to students in the Division of Continuing Education. 

The department, jointly administered by the Colleges of Humanities and Social Sciences 
and Agriculture and Life Sciences, offers eight undergraduate curricula. The five curric- 
ula administered by the College of Humanities and Social Sciences are: Bachelor of Arts in 
sociology, Bachelor of Arts in sociology with criminal justice option. Bachelor of Arts in 
sociology with social studies teacher education option. Bachelor of Arts in sociology with 
anthropology concentration, and Bachelor of Social Work. 



241 



OPPORTUNITIES 

A wide variety of jobs is open to the graduates of this department. 
Both public and private firms employ sociologists in policy development and decision- 
making. Sociology graduates are also employed as research evaluators and sales 

personnel. , • , ... 

Sociology graduates with the criminal justice option have additional opportunities in 
law-enforcement field. Similarly, graduates with social studies teacher education option 
have additional opportunities in public and private schools while the graduates with 
anthropology concentration have the option to pursue graduate studies in anthropology. 

Students graduating with Bachelor of Social Work degree are employed as social 
workers in public and private social work organizations. Fields of employment include 
public welfare agencies, family and children's agencies, hospitals, school systems, mental 
health services, correctional programs, community-centers, rehabilitation agencies, and 
services to the aged. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN SOCIOLOGY 

The following departmental requirements must be met by all students majoring in 
sociology: A minimum of 31 hours in the major field including SOC 300, Social Research 
Methods: SOC 400, Theories of Social Structure; SOC 401, Theories of Social Interaction; at 
least three, but no more than six, credit hours of 200 level sociology courses; at least 15 credit 
hours of 400 level or above sociology courses including SOC 400 and SOC 401. (Note: In the 
LCS program [anthropology concentration], 3 credit hours at the 400 level or above are in 
anthropology.) Additional electives in sociology may be at the 300 level or above. ANT 252. 
Cultural Anthropology, is required. A second course in anthropology is strongly recom- 
mended. One course in statistics is also required. 

Criminal Justice Option— The criminal justice option seeks to develop a professional 
orientation that will be relevant both to occupational goals and participation as a citizen in 
community affairs. Courses in both political science and sociology are included in a 28-hour 
block that provides a general background in crime causation and agencies of criminal 
justice plus the opportunity to select from more specific courses dealing with deviance, 
juvenile delinquency, the court system, correctional facilities, and the like, including field 
placement in an agency of the criminal justice system. 

Social Studies Teacher Education Option— This curriculum prepares the student for 
state certification in social studies in the secondary school system. (132 credit hours 
required for graduation.) The inclusion of a professional semester with practice teaching 
and the need for a broad base in the social sciences makes this a comparatively demanding 
program with somewhat less opportunity for free electives. Courses in education and 
psychology are taken beginning in the sophomore year in preparation for the teaching 
experience. The student learns the basic concepts of economics, political science, anthropol- 
ogy and history, as well as sociology. Enrollments in Teacher Education Option programs 
may be limited. 

Anthropology Concentration— This concentration emphasizes the complementary 
nature of sociology and anthropology in understanding human behavior in social and 
cultural context. It encourages flexibility in selection from both anthropology (12 hours 
within the major plus 6 hours in the social science requirement) and sociology (22 hours) 
courses. The four anthropological subdisciplines of cultural anthropology, physical anthro- 
pology, archaeology, and linguistics are represented in the course offerings. 

BACHELOR OF SOCIAL WORK 

The curriculum is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education and prepares 
students for the professional practice of social work in a variety of social welfare agencies, 
organizations, and programs designed to enrich the quality of life and to improve social 
functioningof people .served. Study will include the social, economic, and political processes 
involved in the development and change of social welfare institutions, the dynamics of 

242 



human behavior and the interventive methods and their application to a variety of situa- 
tions and clients. Thirty-three hours of class and field instruction in social work, plus 
specified courses in the social sciences, the humanities, and natural sciences are required. 
Graduates receive the B.S.W. degree and are certifiable under North Carolina law. 

MINOR IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

A minor in anthropology focuses on the comparative study of human beings, with empha- 
sis on both the physical and cultural aspects. A flexible selection of courses (15 credit hours) 
includes offerings from anthropological subdisciplines such as cultural anthropology, 
physical anthropology, archaeology, and linguistics. 

MINOR IN SOCIAL WORK 

The minor is designed to familiarize the student with the social service system, major 
social welfare programs, and elements of the profession of social work. The student will 
take five required courses and select one additional course from elective offerings which 
present the contribution of professional social work in a number of settings. 

MINOR IN SOCIOLOGY 

This minor emphasizes sociological theory and research with substantive applications. 
The minor builds on theory and methodology and allows students flexibility in the choice of 
subdisciplines such as criminology, stratification, democraphy, social psychology, race and 
ethnic relations, or the family. 



*■ .1 




COLLEGE OF PHYSICAL AND 
MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

Cox Hall (Rooms 113-122) 

J. L. Whitten. Dean 

R. D. Bereman. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs 

R. E. F or nes. Associate Dean for Research 

R. G. Savage. Assvstant Dean for Academic Affairs 

W. P. Hill. Coordinator for African-American Affairs and PAMS Undeclared Program 

The College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences offers students whose interests lie in 
the basic science and mathematical areas, programs of study and research at both the 
graduate and undergraduate level that lead to many exciting career opportunities. In 
addition, the College provides the core science and mathematical education support for the 
entire university. The College consists of six academic departments: Biochemistry. Chem- 
istry. Marine. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics. The 
Center for Research in Scientific Computing. The Institute of Statistics, the Natural 
Resources Research Center, the Precision Engineering Center, the Center for Advanced 
Electronic Materials Processing, the microelectronics research activities, and the new 
biotechnology' research activities are also associated in part with the College. 

Graduates of the College are recruited for technical and administrative positions in 
industrial research and development laboratories, universities and colleges, non-profit 
research organizations and government agencies. A large percentage of the graduates 
undertake advanced study in medical or other professional schools as well as further study 
leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. 

The high school student who enjoys computers, mathematics, chemistry, the geosciences. 
or physics and who has an interest in natural phenomena and their fundamental descrip- 
tions, should consider the career opportunities in the physical and mathematical sciences. 
Students in the College consistently perform very well as undergraduates; approximately 
one-third of the students graduate with honors. 

FACILITIES 

Each department in the college utilizes a number of highly specialized research facilities. 
These range from highly specialized laboratories such as those in solid state physics or 
nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to state-of-the-art instruments such as X-ray 
diffractometers and electron spin resonance spectometers. These laboratories are routinely 
utilized by advanced undergraduates taking part in research programs. In addition, each 
department maintains up-to-date computer laboratories and each has access to the CRAY 
YM P super computer in the Research Triangle Park. Again, these facilities are utilized not 
only for graduate research but for undergraduate research and instruction. A detailed list 
of specialized equipment is available upon request for each department. 

TUTORIAL AND AUDIO-VISUAL ASSISTANCE 

Most of the departments in PAMS offer students some form of free tutorial assistance, 
and several departments provide facilities for students to use supplementary videotaped or 
computer-assisted instructional materials on a voluntary basis. 

CURRICULA 

The College offers undergraduate programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Science 
degree with a major in chemistry, geology, mathematics, meteorology, physics or statistics. 

244 



These curricula have similar freshman years, enabling a freshman to change, without loss 
of time, from one department to another in the College. In addition, the College offers 
programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in geology or 
chemistry. A one year general program (PMU) is offered to students who want to major in 
one of these curricula but have not yet made a decision. Minors are offered in geology, 
mathematics, meteorology, physics and statistics. 

PREMEDICAL SCIENCES 

Medical and dental schools as well as many other health-related professional schools have 
long regarded degree programs in the core physical and mathematical sciences as excellent 
"pre-professional" curricula. Some professional schools prefer the in-depth knowledge 
gained by this route over those curricula which offer a cursory view of a variety of topics. 
For further details, contact Dr. Robert Bereman, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, or 
Dr. Marion Miles, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences Pre-Professional 
Adviser. 

SHORT COURSES AND INSTITUTES 

Several short courses and specialized institutes are offered throughout the academic year 
and during the summer months in chemistry, geology, mathematics, physics, and statistics 
for high school and college faculty. For information, write the associate dean of the school. 

In addition, certain regular courses may be taken for credit through correspondence or 
evening classes through the Division of Continuing Education in Raleigh, Charlotte, or the 
Greensboro-Burlington-Winston-Salem area. For information write North Carolina State 
University Division of Lifelong Education, Raleigh. 

SCHOLARS AND HONORS PROGRAMS 

Exceptional students may be selected to participate in the University Scholars Program 
of the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences (PAMS). Enriched courses in chemis- 
try, English, mathematics, and physics have been developed specifically for program 
participants. At the beginning of the junior year, promising students may select special 
courses, and begin to participate in undergraduate research and honors programs, for 
which they may receive some graduate credit toward the Master of Science degree during 
the senior year. 

Well-prepared students entering the College may seek advanced placement in biology, 
chemistry, computer science, foreign language, history, mathematics, or physics by pass- 
ing qualifying examinations. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

In addition to university-wide extracurricular activities and honor organizations, the 
College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences has student chapters of the following 
professional and honor organizations: Society of Physics Students, Pi Mu Epsilon, the 
American Chemical Society, Mu Sigma Rho, American Meteorology Society, American 
Institute of Mining Engineers (Geology Club), and the nation's first chapter of the Society of 
Black Physical and Mathematical Scientists. 

The PAMS Council, composed of elected students from the college, sponsors and partici- 
pates in a wide variety of technical and social activities. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The Master of Science degree is available with a major in biochemistry; biomathematics: 
chemistry; marine, earth, and atmospheric sciences; mathematics; applied mathematics; 
statistics; and physics. The Master of Biomathematics, Master of Chemistry, and the 
Master of Statistics are also offered. A new jointly administered Master of Arts in Liberal 
Studies (MALS) program with the College of Humanities and Social Sciences is also 
available. The Doctor of Philosophy degree is available in biochemistry, biomathematics. 



245 



chemistry, marine, earth, and atmospheric sciences, mathematics, applied mathematics, 
statistics, and physics. 



BIOCHEMISTRY 

(See Agriculture and Life Sciences) 



CHEMISTRY 

Dabney Hall (Room 108) and Withers Hall 

Professor K. W. Hanck, Head of the Department 

Professor W. P. Tucker, Assistant Head for Undergraduate Studies 

Professor M. L. Miles, Assistant Head for Business Affairs 

Professor R. J. Linderman, Graduate Administrator 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: F. C. Hentz, W. P. Tucker 

Profexxors: R. D. Bereman. E. F. Bowden. L. H. Bowen, C. L. Bumgardner. H. H. Carmichael. D. L. Comins. L. D. 
Freedman. F. W. Getzen. F. C. Hentz. Jr. (Director of General Chemistry). Z Z. Hugus. Jr.. L. A. Jones, S. G. Levine. G. G. 
Long. C. G. Moreland. A. F. Schreiner. L. B. Sims. E. 0. Stejskal. G. H. Wahl. Jr. {Director of Organic Chemistry). M. 
Whangbo, J. L. Whitten; Professors Emeriti: G. 0. Doak. R. H. Loeppert. W. A. Raid. P. P. Sutton. R. C. White: Associate 
Professors: C. B. Boss, T. C. Caves, A. F. Coots, Y. Ebisuzaki, S. T. Purrington, W. L. Switzer, D. W. Wertz; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: T. M. Ward; Assistant Professors: M. G. Khaledi, H. H. Thorp. R. B. van Breemen; Assistant 
Professors Emeritus: T. J. Blalock, W. R. Johnston; liistructor: W. S. Smith; Instructor Emeritus: G. M. Oliver; 
Laboratory Supervisors: R. D. Beck, H. Gracz, G. L. Hennessee, J. C. Le, S. S. Sankar, G. Shaw, J. T. Sigvaldsen, P. 
Singh; Laboratory Demonstrator: M. L. Benevides; Teaching and Research Technicians: M. C. Bundy, D. E. Knight. 

Chemistry is the science dealing with the composition, structure, and properties of all 
substances and changes that they undergo. Chemists have contributed to the synthetic fiber 
industry, petroleum products and fuels, plastics, the food processing industry, nuclear 
energy, electronics, modern drugs and medicine. Today's chemists are concerned with the 
fundamental building blocks of all materials — atoms and molecules — leading to improve- 
ment of old materials, development of substitutes or new ones, and an understanding of our 
material environment. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The chemical industry is the nation's largest manufacturing industry. Chemists com- 
prise the largest proportion of scientists in the United States, and future demand for 
chemists should continue to grow. A variety of jobs are open to the chemist: biochemistry 
and other biological areas, education, medicine, law, metallurgy, space science, oceano- 
graphy, sales or management, pure research and development. Chemists are employed in 
every field based on modern technology; opportunities for chemists in the field of education 
are many and varied. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

The curriculum, accredited by the American Chemical Society, includes a strong, broad 
background in mathematics, physics and the liberal arts. The basic areas of organic, 
physical, inorganic and analytical chemistry are stressed. Laboratory and classroom work 
develop the skills, knowledge and inquiring spirit necessary for a successful career in 
chemistry. The advised elective credits allow individual diversity at the junior and senior 



246 



levels. Many undergraduates participate in current departmental research through part- 
time employment or senior research projects. This curriculum prepares the student to 
enter the job market directly as a chemist or to enter various professional schools or 
graduate school in chemistry or an allied science. This route is also an excellent premedical 
program. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistn- 4 

CH 106 Computer Appl. Chem. I 1 CHIOS ComputerAppl.Chem.il 1 

ENG 111 Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. H 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. P 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Physical Education Elective 1 

16 17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 211 Analytical Chemistry I 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. HI 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry H 4 

PY 208 Physics for Engr. & Sci. U- 4 MA 341 Applied Differential Equations I 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 English Elective (Literature) 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Humanities/Social Sciences Elective' 3 

T7 Physical Education Elective 1 

17 
JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 401 Syst. Inorganic Chemistry I 2 CH 403 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry II 3 

CH 402 Inorganic Chemistry Lab 1 CH 433 Physical Chemistry II 3 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis 3 CH 434 Physical Chem. Lab 2 

CH431 Physical Chemistry I 3 ENG 333 English for Sci. & Res. or 

FL 101 Elementary Language^ 3 Communication Elective 3 

Advised Elective' 3 FL 102 Elementary Language' 3 



15 



Advised Elective' 3 

17 
SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 415 Analytical Chemistry II 3 Advised Elective' 3 

CH 416 Analytical Chemistry Lab 2 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

CH 435 Intro. Quantum Chemistry^ or Free Electives 9 

PY 407 Intro. Modern Physics^ 3 ^ 

Advised Elective' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130^ 

Free Elective 3 

17 



'These credits should be distributed approximately equally between the humanities (fine arts, history, literature. 

languages, philosophy and religion) and the social sciences (anthropology, economics and business, political science, 

psychology and sociology). 

-'The sequence PY 201, 202, 203 may be substituted for PY 205. 208, 407 or (CH 435) with approval of the advisor. 
'German (FLG) is recommended but French, Japanese. Russian and Spanish are acceptable. 
'Advised electives are designed to allow students to concentrate in an area or field of their choice. Courses to fulfill this 

requirement are selected by students after consultation with their advisors or the coordinator of advising. No more than 

four hours of the advised electives should be in introductory courses, i.e., courses having no university prerequisites. 
'=D grades are not accepted in the following courses: CH 101. CH 107, CH 211, CH 221. CH 223, CH 431, CH 433, ENG 

111. ENG 112. MA 141. MA 241. MA 242. PY 205. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN CHEMISTRY 

The B.A. program offers a much more flexible course of studies for students who do not 
plan to become professional chemists but who desire an interdisciplinary program with an 
emphasis on chemistry. The proper choice of electives will prepare the graduate for one of 
the following: medical or dental school, work in chemical sales and management, teaching 
in secondary schools, work in environmental science, or graduate school in an allied science. 



247 



Nationally many premedical students are in a B.A. chemistry program. Since the first year 
is essentially identical to that of the B.S. program, students may enter the B.A. program 
either directly from high school or at the end of their first year. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENGUl Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc.I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 PY 205 Physics for Engr. & Sci. I 4 

Humanities/Social Science Elective ^ Physical Education Elective ^ 

15 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

PY 208 Physics for Eng. & Sci. II 4 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Electives' 6 Science Elective 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 Free Elective 3 



15 



Physical Education Elective 1 

15 
JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH331 Introductory Phys. Chem 4 CH 315 Quantitative Analysis 4 

Humanities/Social Science Electives' 6 Advised Elective- 4 

Science Elective 4 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 6 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

T? 17 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Seviester Credits 

CH 401 Systematic Inorg. Chem. I 2 BCH Introductory Biochem 3 

Advised Electives- 8 Advised Electives^ 6 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 4 

le 16 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 127' 

Because of the inherent flexibility of the B.A. curriculum in chemistry, students entering into the program must work 
closely with their faculty adviser in selecting an area of concentration outside the major, based upon their career or 
postgraduate goals. 



'Thirty hours of humanities and social science courses are required with a minimum of 12 hours each of humanities and 
social sciences. The remaining 6 hours may come from humanitiesor social science courses, including Multidiscipl inary 
Studies and Arts Studies courses. 

-Advised electives are designed to allow the students to concentrate in areas related to academic or career goals. Because 
of the inherent flexibility of the B.A. curriculum in chemistry, students entering into the program must work closely 
with their adviser in selecting an area of concentration outside the major, based upon their career or post-graduate 
goals. 

'D grades are not accepted in the following courses: CH 101, CH 107, CH 221, CH 223, CH 315, CH 331: MA 141, PY 205, 
ENG 111, and ENG 112. 



COMPUTER SCIENCE 

(See College of Engineering.) 



248 



MARINE, EARTH, AND 
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 

Jordan Hall (Room 1125) 

Professor L. J. Pietrafesa, Head of the Department 

Associate Professor E. F. Stoddard, Associate Department Head and Undergraduate 
Administrator 

Distinguished University Scholar: T. F. Malone 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: V. V. Cavaroc, Jr. 

Professors: C. E. Anderson, S. P. S. Arya. V. V. Cavaroc. Jr.. J. M. Davis. D.J. DeMaster. R. V. Fodor, G. S. Janowitz, D. L. 
Kamykowski. S. Raman. V. K. Saxena. C. W. Welby. T. G. Wolcott: \ 'isiting Professors: T. S. Hopkins, C. N. K. Mooers, 
C. S. Ramage: Adjunct Professors: E. G. Boien.G. Briggs, W. J.Cleary. B. Dimitriades, D. F. Kapraun, D. G. Lindquist, 
R. V. Madala. R. K. Sizemore, W. H. Snyder, D. D. Willey, V. A. Zullo; Professors Emeriti: H. S. Brown. L. J. Langfelder, 

C. J. Leith. J. M. Parker, III, W. J. Saucier: Associate Professors: M. G. Bevis, M, M. Kimberley, C. E. Knowies, L. A. 
Levin, J. M. Morrison, A. J. Riordan, F. H. M. Semazzi, W. J. Showers. G. F. Watson: Research Associate Professor: 
Viney Aneja; Visiting Associate Professors: M. L. Kaplan, D. L. Wolcott: Adjunct Associate Professors: S. Chang, R. M. 
Diliaman, R. K. M. Jayanty, C. A. Nittrouer, R. D. Roer, G. W. Thayer, R. H.Weisherg: Assistant Professors: N. E. Blair, 
S. Businger, J. P. Hibbard. E. L, Leithold, Y-L. Lin. P-T. Shaw, S. W. Snyder. J. A. Speer: Research Assistatit Professor: 

D. E. Checkley: Visiting Assistant Professors: F. H. Proctor, H. Yamazakv. Adjunct Assistant Professors: T. B. Curtin. 
M. DeMaria, J. C. Reid; Unirersity Distinguished Scholar: T. F. Malone; Scholar in Residence: R. Braham. 

The Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences provides instruction in 
three complementary disciplines whose concerns are the solid earth, the oceans upon it, and 
the atmosphere extending upward from its surface. Courses, curricula, and research 
programs in the department deal with many aspects of two very important human con- 
cerns: natural resources and environmental sciences. The department awards the B.A. 
degree in geology; a B.S. degree in geology with options either in traditional geology or in 
geophysics; and a B.S. degree in meteorology. Degrees in Marine Science are offered only at 
the graduate level. (Consult the Graduate (Catalog for information pertaining to graduate 
degrees offered.) 

Geology (Earth Science) is the study of the solid earth. It can be subdivided into four 
interrelated areas: rocks and minerals (mineralogy, petrology, and ore deposits); nature 
and behavior of earth materials (structural geology, geophysics, geochemistry, and geo- 
morphology); earth history (historical geology, stratigraphy, tectonics and paleontology); 
and the earth's influence upon humanity (engineering, petroleum, economic and environ- 
mental geology and hydrogeology). Instruction within the geology degree programs 
includes course work in each of these areas. The geophysics option includes a core of basic 
geology courses, but in addition provides a thorough grounding in geophysics and related 
sciences. The program involves more coursework in physics, mathematics and computer 
science than does the traditional Geology B.S. Geophysics applies these quantitative sci- 
ences to an understanding of earth, including its deep interior. This is accomplished 
through the measurement and interpretation of earth's physical properties (e.g. magnetic, 
electric, gravity, seismic) at all scales. 

Geologists and geophysicists apply scientific techniques to solve those problems in nature 
that will result in a better understanding and utilization of our environment and natural 
resources. Geologic and geophysical principles are used (1) to discover, evaluate, develop 
and conserve our natural resources (oil, coal, water and metals), (2) to find solutions to 
problems related to disposal of liquid and solid wastes, (3) in determining the geologic 
settings for highways, dams, tunnels, and power plants and (4) to help prevent or alleviate 
the consequences of natural disasters such as earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions, dam 
failures, and highway collapse. 

Meteorology (Atmospheric Science) is the study of all aspects of the behavior and 
phenomena of the atmosphere, including its interactions with earth's land and sea surfaces 
and with the solar atmosphere. Its objective is to apply an understanding of the atmosphere 
to the benefit of humanity. 



249 



Few activities on earth are unaffected by the natural conditions and processes of our 
atmospheric environment. The most familiar purpose of meteorolpgy is in providing 
weather reports, warnings, and forecasts which are essential to aviation, shipping, agricul- 
ture, solar and wind energy utilization, outdoor recreation and to the protection of humans 
from weather hazards and damage. Meteorology is applied to the understanding and 
alleviation of other environmental concerns such as air pollution, acid rain, and weather 
modification. The concern about environmental quality has led to expanded efforts in 
atmospheric modeling and monitoring, research applied to industrial operations, environ- 
mental planning and governmental regulation. Basic subdivisions in the field of meteorol- 
ogy are synoptic and dynamic, boundary layer, air pollution, and agricultural meteorology; 
cloud and aerosol physics; and climatology. 

Oceanography (Marine Science) is primarily taught at the graduate level (see Graduate 
Catalog). The department does offer two introductory courses at the undergraduate level. 
One of these (MEA 200) provides a survey of the marine science field; the other (ME A 220) is 
a survey of marine biology. The department also offers several beginning graduate level 
courses for senior level undergraduate students. Students interested in pursuing a gradu- 
ate program in marine science may wish to enroll in these courses as electives. A strong 
undergraduate foundation in one of the basic sciences or in engineering is needed before a 
student concentrates in marine related fields. Therefore, graduate students in marine 
science are drawn from undergraduate programs in biology, chemistry, engineering, 
geolog>', mathematics, meteorology or physics. 

OPPORTUNITIES 

The problems involving energy and mineral resources and the environment are complex 
and will not likely yield to easy or quick solutions. Geologists and geophysicists are cur- 
rently employed by environmental and geotechnical consulting firms, oil and coal compan- 
ies, mining and quarrying concerns, mineral exploration companies, construction firms, 
cement companies, and railroads; coastal and forest service agencies; schools, colleges, 
museums and research institutions; and city, state and federal agencies (e.g. D.O.E., 
U.S.G.S., N.A.S.A., and E.P.A.). 

Meteorological and oceanographic services are provided by federal government agen- 
cies, primarily the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and components of 
the Department of Defense. This work may involve atmospheric and oceanic sensing and 
measurement, including the use of satellites and space probes; data analysis and computa- 
tion; weather forecasting, and guidance services to aeronautics, defense and public safety 
agencies, agriculture, forestry, hydrology, recreation and public health. Meteorologists are 
involved in environmental planning and regulation at the state and local levels. Power 
generation and fuel transmission industries, engineering firms, environmental consulting 
firms, insurance companies, major retailing businesses, as well as schools, colleges and 
research institutions employ meteorologists because of recognition of the involvement of the 
atmosphere in their activities. 

FACILITIES 

The Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences maintains an extensive 
inventory of both laboratory and field research equipment and facilities. The department 
has use of the R/V Cape Hatteras, a 135 ft. coastal zone research vessel. Specialized 
equipment available in the department include an X-ray fluorescence spectrometer, an 
automated X-ray diffractometer, neutron activation analysis equipment, geophysics 
instruments; (e.g., gravimeter, magnetometer, and seismic reflection equipment), radioiso- 
tope and stable isotope analytical equipment, a phytotron, an interactive satellite informa- 
tion processing system (McIDAS),CTD and hydrographies sampling systems and deep and 
shallow water moored instrumentation. Some of the specialized laboratories that are 
available in the department include an electron microprobe laboratory, sedimentology lab 
(microcomputer controlled grain-size analyzer) cloud-aerosol interaction lab, planetary 
boundary-layer lab, weather analysis and forecasting lab; a weather observatory including 
DIFAX. FA A 604, and satellite image receiving services, rooftop weather-monitoring and 



250 



balloon-launch platforms: and severe storm and mesoscale research labs. The department 
also houses the Office of the State Climatologist. In addition to numerous microcomputers, 
the department maintains a VAX minicomputer with associated graphics devices and 
remote terminals in departmental labs and offices. 

CURRICULA IN MARINE, EARTH AND ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCES 

The B.A. and B.S. degree programs in geology require the same geology courses, but 
differ in their content of social science-humanities, mathematics, and collateral physical 
sciences. The B.A. program is designed to be similar to a B.S. degree in geology obtained 
from other universities, while the B.S. program is more technically oriented, and similar to 
other curricula in the physical sciences at NCSU. The B.S. degree program in meteorology 
also follows the pattern of physical sciences curricula. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A 4 MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B 3 

MEA 101 Geolog>' I: Physical 3 MEA 102 Geolog>' II: Historical 3 

MEAllO Geolog>'ILab 1 MEA 111 Geology II Lab 1 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

Is I4 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

MEA 330 Crystallography & Mineralogy 3 MEA 440 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology 4 

MEA 331 Optical Mineralogy 2 ST 311 Intro, to Statistics 3 

Computer Science Option- 2-3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 Physical Education Elective 1 



15 



Physical Education Elective 1 

15-16 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 333 Commun. for Sci. & Res." 3 MEA 451 Structural Geology 4 

MEA 450 Sediment Petrology & Stratigraphy 4 PY 212 General Physics 4 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

17 17 

SUMMER SESSION 

MEA 465. 466 Geologic Field Camp I. II 6 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MEA 468 Invert. Paleontology & Biostratigraphy 4 MEA 491 Senior Seminar 2 

Earth Science Elective^ 3 Earth Science Elective' 3 

Earth Science Elective^ 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Electives' 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective' 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Electives' 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Electives 3 

16 14 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 129 

'A course in each of at least three humanities {e.g. fine arts, history, literature, language, philosophy, religioni and in 
each of at least three social sciences (e.i?. anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, sociology). At least nine 
hours must come from courses beyond the introductory level. 

^Computer Science Option to be selected from among CSC 101, CSC 111. and CSC 200. 

'Earth Science Electives are above the 300 level. 

<ENG 331 or ENG 332 may be substituted for ENG 333. 



251 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II 4 

ENGlll Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Readmg 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry «& Calc. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

MEA 101 Geology I: Physical 3 MEA 102 Geology II: Historical 3 

MEAUO Geology I Lab 1 MEA 111 Geology II Lab 1 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness M_ Physical Education Elective M_ 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MEA 440 Igneous & Metamorphic Petrology 4 

MEA 330 Crystallography & Mineralogy 3 PY 205 Physics Engrs. & Scient. I 4 

MEA 331 Optical Mineralogy 2 Social Science Elective 3 

Computer Science Option' 2-3 Statistics Option- 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Physical Education Elective M_ 

Physical Education Elective ■•■ 1 15 

15-16 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 333 Commun. for Sci. and Res,' 3 MEA 451 Structural Geology 4 

MEA 450 Sediment Petrology & Stratigraphy .... 4 COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

PY 208 Physics Engrs. & Scient. II 4 Math/Science Option^ 3-4 

Humanities Elective 3 Philosophy/History Sci. Option* 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

T? 16-17 

SUMMER SESSION 

MEA 465, 466 Geologic Field Camp I. II 6 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credit'i Spring Semester Credits 

MEA 468 Invert. Paleontology & Biostratigraphy 4 MEA 491 Senior Seminar 2 

Earth Science Elective' 3 Earth Science Elective' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Technical Elective A* 3-4 Technical Elective B'* 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

16-17 14 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 131 



'Computer Science Option to be selected from among CSC 101. CSC 111, and CSC 200. 

^Statistics Option to be selected from among ST 301, ST 361, and ST 371. 

'Math/Science Option to be selected from among CH 220, 221. 315, 331, 431: MA 305, 341, 421: PY 407: MAE 301; CSC 
.302: CE 213: ST 302. 

•Philosophy/History of Science Option to be selected from among PHI ,340. HI .321, HI 322, and MDS (UNI) 301. 

'Earth Science Electives are above the 300 level. 

'Technical Elective is a paired two-course sequence in a related field. Examples include: Physics (e.g. PY411 and 412: 
PY 407 and 441 ): Astronomy {e.g. PY 223 and 240): Biological Sciences {e.g. BO 200 and 360: BS 100 and ZO 220): Civil 
Engineeringlcf/. CE 214 and 215: CE 201 and 213): Soil Science (c.;;. SSC 200 and SSC .361): Economics (c.?. EB 201 and 
202): Anthropology {e.<i. ANT 251 and 253): Computer Science {e.g. CSC 201 and 202): Chemistry {e.g. CH 331 and 401: 
CH 223 and 428. provided CH 221 has been taken to fulfill the Math/Science Option requirement): Mathematics {e.g. 
MA 225 and 403): Statistics {e.g ST .302 and 4.32 or ST 372 and 432, provided ST .301 or ST 371 have been used to fulfill 
the Statistical Science Option requirement): Meteorology {e.g. MEA 130 and 311); Marine Science(e.3. MEA 200 plus 
any one of MEA 220,510, 560,or 571). Courses used to fulfill other requirements may not be applied to the Technical 
Elective requirement. 

'ENG 331 or ENG 332 may be substituted for ENG 333. 

MINOR IN GEOLOGY 

The Department of Marine. Earth and Atmospheric Sciences offers a Minor in Geology to 
majors in any field except geology (GYA. GYS, and GPY). Admission to the program 
requiresagradeof Cor better in MEA 110 and either MEA 101 or MEA 120. Successful 



252 



completion of the program requires a grade of C or better in at least 15 hours of geology 
courses beyond the first semester including at least two lab courses. Contact department for 
information. 

GEOPHYSICS OPTION, BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN GEOLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CHIOS Chemistry Princ. & AppI 3 

ENGIU Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. H 4 

MEA 101 Geoloiry I: Physical 3 PY 201 University Physics I' 4 

MEA 110 Geology I Lab 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 ^ 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Intro. FORTRAN 2 CSC 302 Numerical Methods 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. HI 4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations I 3 

MEA 329 Elementsof Crystal. & Mineralogy 2 MEA 439 Elements of Igneous & Meta. Petro 3 

PY 202 University Physics II' 4 PY 203 University Physics IIP 4 

Humanities Elective 3 Humanities Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

le 17 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 401 Applied Diff. Equations II 3 MEA 451 Structural Geology 4 

MEA 450 Sed. Petrol. & Stratig 4 ST 361 Intro. Statistics 3 

MEA 470 Intro. Geophysics 3 Social Science Elective 3 

PY411 Mechanics I 3 Earth Science Elective 3 

Social Science Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

le 16 

SUMMER SESSION 

MEA 475 Geophysical Field Methods 2 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MEA 471 Exploration Geophysics 3 MEA 476 Seismic Exploration for Oil 3 

PY 414 Electricity & Magnetism I 3 Earth Science Elective^ 3 

Geophysics Elective- 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 Technical Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

l5 Is 

Minimum Hours Required 128 

'Students transferring into the program may substitute PY 205. 208. 407 for the sequence PY 201. 202, 203. 
^Geophysics elective to be chosen from MEA 41S. 461. or 523. 
^Recommended that GPY students take MEA 491. 

^Technical elective constitutes a minor field of emphasis. Among those recommended, are physics (PY 412, 413. 415). 
math (MA 405, 427-428. 501). 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN METEOROLOGY 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CHIOS Chemistry— Princp. & Appl.' 3 

ENGlll Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG112 Composition and Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry and Calc. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 PY 205 Physics Engrs. & Scient. I 4 

Social Science Elective 3 Physical Education Elective ^ 

Is 15 



253 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equa. I 3 

MEA311 Physical Climatology 3 MEA 312 Physical Meteorology 3 

MEA313 Meteorology Lab I 1 MEA 314 Meteorology Lab II 1 

PY 208 Physics Engrs. & Sclent. II 4 Approved Elective^ 3 

Social Science Electiye 3 Geophysical Sciences Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Humanities Elective 3 



16 



Physical Education Elective 1 

17 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 1 1 1 Intro, to FORTRAN Program 2 MEA 405 Climatological Data Analysis 3 

MEA 421 Atmospheric Dynamics I 4 MEA 412 Atmospheric Physics 3 

ST 361 Intro. Sutistics 3 MEA 422 Atmospheric Dynamics II 4 

Approved Elective' 3 Communicative Arts Elective^ 3 

Communicative Arts Elective' 3 Free Elective ^ 

Humanities Elective* j_3 jg 

18 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MEA 443 Weather Anly. & Fcstg. I 3 Approved Electives' 6 

MEA 455 Micrometeorology 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective 3 

Approved Elective'' 3 Meteorology Technical Elective^ 3 

Humanities/Social Sci. Elective 3 Free Elective 3 



Free Elective 3 



15 
Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 127 



'Students who intend to take additional chemistry courses, or who plan technical electives which require additional 

chemistry, should add CH 104 or replace CH 105 with CH 103 or CH 107. Advanced transfer students are permitted to 

substitute mathematics, science, or engineering credits for CH 105. 
•■^Geophysical sciences elective is selected from among MEA 101, MEA 120-110, MEA 200, PY 223. SSC 200, CE 201 or 

370. FOR 272. 

'Two courses in a foreign language, or one course each in communication and technical writing, but see note at 4 below. 
Mf the foreign language option is selected to filfull the Communicative Arts requirement, then one Humanities Elective 

may be replaced with a Free Elective. 
'Approved elective constitutes a minor field of emphasis consisting of at least 15 credits in a single discipline or related 

disciplines. These include, but are not limited to: biometeorology, chemistry, computer science, environmental quality, 

geology-geophysics, hydrology, mathematics, physics, physical oceanography, statistics; several areas of engineering, 

agriculture, forestry; science education; weather communication. 
'Meteorology technical elective to be chosen from MEA 444 or MEA 556. 

MINOR IN METEOROLOGY 

The Department of Marine, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences offers a Minor in Meteo- 
rology to majors in any field except meteorology. Admission to the program requires a 
grade of C or better in at least 15 hours of meteorology at the 300 level or above. These hours 
must include courses MEA 421 and MEA 422. Other courses taken should be selected in 
consultation with meteorology faculty. Contact department for information. 



MATHEMATICS 

Harrelson Hall (Room 360) 

Professor R. H. Martin, Jr., Head of the Department 

Professor J. A. Marlin, Associate Head of the Department and Scheduling Officer 

Associate Professor D. E. Garoutte, Assistant Head of the Department and Director of 
Undergraduate Instruction 



254 



Associate Professor R. T. Ramsay, Director of Undergraduate Programs 

Professor E. E. Burniston, Director of Summer School 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: J. M. A. Dan by 

Professors: J. W. Bishir, S. L. Campbell, R. E. Chandler. L. 0. Chung, J. M. A. Danby, J. C. Dunn, A. Fauntleroy, R. 0. 
Fulp, R. E. Hartwig. C. T. Kelley, K. Koh, J. R. Kolb, J. Luh, L. B. Martin, C. D. Meyer, Jr., C. V. Pao, E. L. Peterson, R. 
J. Plemmons, M. Putcha. H. Sagan, J. F. Belgrade. M. Shearer. C. E. Siewert. M. F. Singer. E. L. Stitzinger. R. E. 
White: Professors Emeriti: J. Levine. H. V. Park. P. A. Nickel. N. J. Rose. H. E. Speece, J. B. Wilson; Associate 
Professors: M. Chu. J. D. Cohen. G. D. Faulkner. J. E. Franke, T. Lada, D. M. Latch. L. K. Norris. L. B. Page. R. T. 
Ramsay. J. Rodriguez. R. G. Savage. S. Schecter. R. Silber. J. W. Silverstein, D. F. Ullrich, W, M. Waters; Associate 
Professor Emeritus: H. C. Cooke, H. A. Petrea; Assistant Professors: H.J. Charlton, X. Garaizar, R. Haas, D. J. Hansen. 
G. Helminck. P. Hitczenko. A. Kheyfets, K. C. Misra, S. 0. Paur, J. L. Rulla, J. S. Scroggs, S. J. Wright; Assistant 
Professor Emeritus: C. F. Lewis; Lecturers: E. L. Barnhardt. M. McCollum. J. E. Rohrbach. M. Schiermeier; Associate 
Members of the Department: H. van der Vaart, 0. Wesler. 

The undergraduate major in mathematics provides a core of basic mathematics courses 
along with flexible choices of electives which permit both a well-rounded education and 
preparation for math-related careers. Because of the current employment market (for both 
baccalaureate and graduate students), students are advised to give serious consideration to 
the applied mathematics option. 

Career objectives can be directed toward employment in math-related jobs in business, 
industry, or government, teaching at the secondary school level, or graduate study in 
mathematics and/or related areas. 

The Mathematics Department operates a Tutorial and Audio Visual Center. This center 
is one of the most advanced of its kind in the country, incorporating video systems whereby a 
student who has missed a particular lecture or would like to see and hear a lecture on a 
particular topic once again can do so. Teaching assistants of the Mathematics Department 
are also available in the center for tutoring services. The center also has Computer Assisted 
Instruction Systems which incorporate a computer with a video player. With this system, 
the student is able to test himself or herself. The test is graded by the computer and if the 
student fails the test, he or she can watch a short lecture on the relevant material. 

At this time, the center has video tapes of most of our basic courses, including MA 105, 
MA 111, MA 114, MA 121, MA 131, MA 141, MA 241, MA 242, MA 341. 

The director of the center is Professor R. G. Savage, who is recognized as being one of the 
leading experts in this mode of mathematics education. The center is open 11 hours a day 
and is located in Harrelson Hall. 

HONORS AND AWARDS 

The department recognizes its superior students with the following annual awards: 

Hubert V. and Mary Alice Park Scholarship— An award made to an outstanding rising 
junior or senior in mathematics. 

John W. Cell Scholarships— An award for an outstanding rising junior or senior in 
mathematics. 

Carey Mumford Scholarship— An award to an outstanding sophomore, junior or senior in 
mathematics. 

Levine-Anderson Award— An award for that student who has the best performance in the 
William Lowell Putnam Examination. (This award is not restricted to mathematics 
majors). 

Charles N. Anderson Scholarship— An award for an outstanding sophomore in mathe- 
matics. 

Charles F. Lewis Scholarship— An award for an outstanding senior who is a double major 
in mathematics/mathematics education. 

Mrs. Roberts C. Bullock Scholarship — An award for an outstanding mathematics major 
who has also demonstrated an interest in the English language. 

The department also has a chapter of the National Mathematical Honorary Fraternity Pi 
Mu Epsilon. Membership is open to those students with superior performance in mathe- 
matics courses. Professor Robert Silber is currently the faculty advisor. 



255 



MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry 4 CSC 101 Intro, to Programming 3 

ENGIU Composition and Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Caic. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 Intermediate Foreign Language Elective 3 

History Elective 3 Advised Elective 3 

~jT Physical Education Elective 1 

17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 225 Struct. Real Num. System 3 MA 341 Applied Differential^q. I 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MA 407 Intro, to Modern Algebra 3 

PY 205 General Physics I 4 PY 208 General Physics II 4 

Advised Elective 3 Social Sciences Elective' 3 

Literature Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

18 17 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 405 Intro. Linear Alg. & Matrices 3 MA 421 Intro, to Probability^ 3 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 3 MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II 3 

Advised Elective 3 Advised Elective 3 

Social Science Elective' 3 Humanities/Social Sciences Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

15 15 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Humanities/Social Sciences Electives' 6 Humanities/Social Sciences Electives' 3 

Mathematical Electives 6 Mathematical Electives 6 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 6 

li 14 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 126' 



'Of the 18 hours required as social science electives or humanities/social sciences electives, 6 must be at the 300 level or 

above. 

^If ST 371 & 372 are taken in place of MA 421, the number of hours taken as advised electives is reduced by 3. 
'Grades of D are not accepted in any required mathematics course numbered below 400 and only one D grade is 

permitted in mathematics courses numbered 400 or above in the mathematics electives category. D grades are not 

acceptable in ENG 111 and ENG 112. At more, one D grade is acceptable among the following: CH 101, CSC 101. PY 

205, PY 208, MA 421 (ST 371, ST 372). 

MATHEMATICS CURRICULUM, APPLIED MATHEMATICS OPTION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CSC 101 Intro, to Programming 3 

ENGIU Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 Intermediate Foreign Language Elective 3 

History Elective? 3 Social Science Elective' 3 

"77 Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



256 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 225 Struct. Real Num. Syst 3 MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations I 3 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MA 407 Intro, to Modern Algebra 3 

PY205 General Physics I 4 PY 208 General Physics II 4 

ST 371 Intro, to Probability/Stat^ 3 ST 372 Intro. Stat. Infer & Regres.^ 3 

Literature Elective 3 Social Science Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

18 17 
JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 405 Intro. Linear Alg. & Matrices 3 MA 426 Mathematical Analysis II 3 

MA 425 Mathematical Analysis I 3 MA 432 Mathematical Models 3 

Approved Elective 3 Approved Elective 3 

Science Science Elective' 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

15 15 
SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Approved Elective 3 Approved Elective 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Mathematics Elective 3 Mathematics Elective 3 

Free Electives 6 Free Electives 5 

15 14 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 126^ 



'Of the 18 hours required as social science electives or humanities/ social sciences electives, 6 must be at the 300 level or 

above. 
^ST 371 & 372 may be replaced by MA 421, which would be more successfully handled in the junior year: in that case, an 

additional approved elective is required and two electives should be taken during the sophomore year. 
'Grades of D are not accepted in any required mathematics course numbered below 400 and only one D grade is 

permitted in mathematics courses numbered 400 or above in the mathematics electives category. D grades are not 

acceptable in ENG 1 1 1 and ENG 1 12. At most one D grade is acceptable among the following: CH 101, CSCIOI. PY 205, 

PY 208, MA 421 (ST 371, ST 372). 

MINOR IN MATHEMATICS 

The Department of Mathematics offers a minor in mathematics to majors in any field 
except mathematics. The minor program consists of successful completion with a grade of 
C or better of any five three-semester-hour courses selected from among MA 225, or MA 
222, but not both, and any mathematics courses numbered 300 or above. 



PHYSICS 

Cox Hall (Room 105) 

Professor R. R. Patty, Head of Department 

Professor G. E. Mitchell, Associate Department Head 

Professor C. E. Johnson, Assistant Department Head 

Professor D. R. Tilley, Coordinator of Advising 

University Professor: G. I. Lucovsky 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professors: C. R. Gould, D. G. Haase 

Professors: J. Bernholc, K. T, Chung. S. R. Cotanch, W. R. Davis, W. 0. Doggett. R. E. Fornes. C. R. Gould, D. G. Haase, G. 
L. Hall, A. W. Jenkins, C. E. Johnson. K. L. Johnson, G. H. Katzin, F. Lado, G. Lucovsky, J. D. Memory, G. E. Mitchell, J. 



257 



R. Mowat. R. J. Nemanich. M. A. Paesler. J. Y. Park. R. R. Patty. J. S. Risley. D. E. Sayers. J. F. Schetzina. L. W. 
Seagondollar. D. R. Tilley.: -4 d>unf( /"ro/essors. J. Narayan, J. M. Zavada; Pro/fssor.s£'TO<'n7i. J. T. Lynn, A. C. Menius. 
Jr.. E. R. Manning. L. H. Thomas; Asxociate Professors: G. C. Cobb. J. W. Cook. M. A. Klenin. G. W. Parker. S. P. 
Reynolds; Adjunct Associate Professors: E. 0. Edney. D. C. Koningsberger. J. F. Shriner. A. S. Schlachter. W. 
Westerveld; Associate Professor Emeritus: D. H. Martin; Assistant Professor: D. C. Ellison; Assistant Professor 
Emeritus: H. L. Owen: Adjunct Assistant Professor: J. W. Spence; Associate Members of the Department:]. M. A. Danby 
(Mathematics). R. M. Kolbas (ECE). L. K. Norris (Mathematics). D. L. Ridgeway (Statistics). 

Physics is the fundamental science of observation, measurement and mathematical 
description of nature. In addition to establishing basic knowledge of physical phenomena, 
physics provides the foundation for modern technology. Contributions by physicists are 
wide ranging: discovery of elementary particles, invention and use of instruments to 
investigate interplanetary space, study of processes fundamental to the release of thermo- 
nuclear energy, development of lasers and solid state devices, research on the structure and 
interaction of nucleons, nuclei, atoms, molecules, and ions. 

PROGRAMS 

The Physics Department offers a program of study at the undergraduate level which 
provides the student with a strong fundamental background and with course options 
allowing deeper study of selected areas of individual interest. At the graduate level, a 
comprehensive fundamental preparation is followed by specialization and research in one 
of the following areas: atmospheric, astrophysics, atomic, nuclear, nuclear magnetic reson- 
ance, plasma, relativity and solid state physics. (See listing of graduate degrees and consult 
the Graduate Catalog.) 

PHYSICS CURRICULUM 

The undergraduate curriculum in physics provides the basic training for a career in 
physics or for graduate study. The curriculum leads to a Bachelor of Science in Physics. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 PY 201 General Physics 4 

PY 101 Perspectives on Physics 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 T^ 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MA 341 Applied Differential Equations I 3 

PY 202 General Physics 4 MA 405 Linear Algebra Matrices 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 PY 203 General Physics 4 

Free Elective 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Free Elective 3 

"77 Physical Education Elective 1 

17 
JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

MA 401 Applied Differential Equations II 3 ENG 333 Comm. for Science & Research 3 

PY411 Mech.iniccl 3 PY412 Mechanics II 3 

PY 414 Electricity & Magnetism I 3 PY 413 Thermal Physics 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 PY 415 Electricity & Magnetism II 3 

Free Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

li 15 



258 



SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PY 401 Modern & Quantum Physics I 3 PY 402 Modern & Quantum Physics II 3 

PY 452 Advanced Physics Lab 1 PY 452 Advanced Physics Lab 1 

Humanities/Social Science Electis'e 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Technical Electives 6 Technical Electives 6 

PY Elective 3 Free Elective 3 

16 le 



Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 126 



MINOR IN PHYSICS 



The Physics Department offers a minor in physics to majors in any field except physics. 
To complete the minor 17 hours of specified physics courses are required, consisting of PY 
205. 208, 407 (or 201, 202, 203) and two of PY 228, 411, 412, 413, 414, 415, 441. 



STATISTICS 

Cox Hall (Room 110) 

Professor D. L. Solomon, Head of the Department 

Assistant Professor B. J. Stines, Undergraduate Administrator 

Distinguished University Professor and William Neal Reynolds Professor: C. C. Cockerham 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: B. B. Bhattacharyya 

Drexel Professor of Biomathematics: H. R. van der Vaart 

Professors: R. L. Berger. B. B. Bhattacharyya. P. Bloomfield. D. D. Boos, C. C. Cockerham. D. A. Dickey, A. R. Gallant, T. 
M. Gerig. F. G. Giesbrecht. H.J. Gold. T. Johnson. J. F. Monahan. K. H. Pollock. C. H. Proctor. C. P. Quesenberry. J. 0. 
Rawlings. D. L. Ridgeway.W. H. Swallow. H. R. van der Vaart, J. L. Wasik, B. S. Weir, 0. Wesleri^djMwc^Pro/e.s.sors.- 
H.T. Bhattacharvva, J. R. Chromy. A.L. Finkner. J. H. Goodnight. A. R. Manson. R. L. Obenchain; : Professors Emeriti: 
A. H. E. Grandage. R. J. Hader. D. W. Hayne. D. D. Mason. R. J. Monroe. L. A. Nelson. J. A. Rigney. R. G. D. Steel; 
Associate Professors: C. Brownie. E. J. Dietz. S. P. Ellner. A. C. Linnerud. D. W. Nychka, S. G. Pantula. T. W. Reiland, 
C. E. Smith. L. A. Stefanski: Adjunct Associate Professors: B. G. Cox. W. W. Piegorsch; Assistant Professors: M. 
Davidian. M. L. Gumpertz. J. C. Lu. B. J. Stines; Senior Statisticians: S. B. Donaghy, D. W. Turner; Associate 
Statistician: W. L. Cornelius; Assistant Statisticians: P. L. Marsh. S. E. Spruill; Laboratory Supervisor: J . T. Arnold; 
Associate Members of the Statistics Faculty: W. R. Atchley (Genetics). T. H. Emigh (Genetics), M. M. Goodman (Crop 
Science). W. L. Hafley (Forestry), A. R. Hall (Economics & Business). V. K. Smith (Economics & Business). M. W. Suh 
(Textiles); Associate Members of the Biomathematics Faculty: J. W. Bishir (Mathematics). T. Johnson (Economics & 
Business). G. Namkoong (Genetics). H. E. Schaffer (Genetics). S. M. Schneider (Plant Pathology). J. F. Belgrade 
(Mathematics). R. E. Stinner (Entomology). G. G. Wilkerson (Crop Science); Adjunct Professor of Biomathematics: M. 
W. Anderson; Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomathematics: P. Dixon. 

Statistics is the body of scientific methodology which deals with the logic of experiment 
and survey design, the efficient collection and presentation of quantitative information, and 
the formulation of valid and reliable inferences from sample data. The computer is used as a 
research tool by the statistician to perform the tasks of management and analysis of data 
collected from experiments and surveys. 

The Department of Statistics is part of the Institute of Statistics, which includes Depart- 
ments of Biostatistics and Statistics at Chapel Hill. The Department of Statistics provides 
instruction, consultation and computational services on research projects for other 
departments of all colleges at North Carolina State University including the Agricultural 
Research Service. Department staff are engaged in research in statistical theory and 
methodology. This range of activities furnishes a professional environment for training 
students in the use of statistical procedures in the physical, biological and social sciences, 
and in industrial research and development. 



259 



OPPORTUNITIES 

The importance of sound statistical thinking in the design and analysis of quantitative 
studies is generally recognized and is reflected in the abundance of job opportunities for 
statisticians. Industry relies on statistical methods to control the quality of goods in the 
process of manufacture and to determine the acceptability of goods produced. Statistical 
procedures based on scientific sampling have become basic tools in such diverse fields as 
weather forecasting, opinion polling, crop and livestock estimation, and business trend 
prediction. Because one can improve the efficiency of use of increasingly complex and 
expensive experiment and survey data, the statistician is in demand wherever quantitative 
studies are conducted. 

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS 

The Department of Statistics recognizes the importance of superior academic perfor- 
mance through the awarding of scholarships and certificates of merit. Two scholarships are 
available for the freshman year for the purpose of attracting academically superior stu- 
dents. The North Carolina State University Chapter of Mu Sigma Rho, the national 
statistics honorary fraternity, accepts as members students who have had superior perfor- 
mance in statistics courses. Also, the outstanding senior statistics student is recognized 
through the awarding of an engraved plaque. 

STATISTICS CURRICULUM 

The undergraduate curriculum provides basic training for a career in statistics or for 
graduate study and leads to the bachelor of science in statistics. In addition to statistics, the 
curriculum includes study in mathematics, computer science, and the biological/physical 
sciences. While fulfilling their major elective requirements, students can either elect a 
minor or distribute their study across fields exploring the application of statistics in other 
fields, such as agriculture and life sciences, computer science, economics and business, 
industrial engineering, and the social sciences. A cooperative work-study option is also 
available. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 CSC 101 Introduction to Programming 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calculus I 4 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calculus H 4 

PMS 100 Orientation to PAMS 1 Science Elective' 4 

ST 101 Statistics by Example 3 Physical Education Elective 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 T7 

15 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Introduction to FORTRAN Prog, or COM (SP) 110 Public Speaking 3 

CSC 295 Special Topics in Computer Science 2 MA 305 Elementary Linear Algebra 3 

EB201 Economics I 3 PSY 200 Introduction to Psychology or 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calculus III 4 SOC 202 Principles of Sociology 3 

ST 301 SUtistical Methods I 3 ST 302 Statistical Methods II 3 

Science Elective' 4 Science Elective' 4 

Physical Education Elective 1 Physical Education Elective 1 

JUNIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

ENG .331 Commun. for Engring. & Tech 3 ST 422 Intro, to Mathematical Statistics II 3 

ST 421 Intro, to Mathematical Statistics I 3 ST 431 Intro, to Experimental Design 3 

ST 430 Intro, to Regression Analysis 3 ST 432 Intro, to Survey Sampling 3 

Major Elective^ 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Science Elective' 3-4 Major Elective^ 3 

jg.jg Mathematics Elective' 3 

18 



260 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

ST 435 Stat. Meth. for Qual. & Prod. Improv 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Major Elective^ 3 

Major Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

ST 445 Intro, to Stat. Comp. & Data Mgmt." 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective 3 

Major Elective^ : 3 

Statistics Elective* 3 

Free Electives 6 

li 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130* 

'Two sequences selected from CH 101-107; PY 205-208; BS 100 and BO 200 or ZO 201; MEA 101 with 1 10 and MEA 102 

or 130 or 200. At least one year of CH or PY. 

^The major elective courses, selected from a list of approved major electives, require the approval of student's adviser. 
'Mathematics elective to be one course selected from MA 341, 425, 427, 428, or 511. 
*A major written report required. 

'Statistics elective to be taken from a list of Statistics major elective courses. 
'Not more than one D grade will be accepted in the required ST and MA courses, the major electives and CSC 101 (with a 

grade of C or better required in ST 421). 

MINOR IN STATISTICS 

The Department of Statistics offers a minor in statistics to majors in any field except 
statistics. The minor program consists of the successful completion of ST 301-302, ST 
371-372 or ST 421-422, and one other approved Department of Statistics course with a 
grade of C or better in each course. 



^ 



^^^0^. 






^<i 



■ij«*«!^'^ 



COLLEGE OF TEXTILES 



College of Textiles, (Room 3-421) Centennial Campus 

R. A. Barnhardt, Dean 

D. R. Buchanan, Associate Dean 

P. L. Grady, Associate Dean 

S. P. Hersh, Interim Associaie Dean 

C. L. Barton, Assistant to the Dean, Student Services 

P. L. Garwig, Librarian, Burlington Textiles Library 

The field of textiles is broad. It covers almost every aspect of our daily lives with 
applications in medicine, space, recreation and sports, personal safety, environmental 
improvement and control, transportation, household and apparel uses. These versatile 
materials, textiles, are made to design specifications by a variety of modern high speed 
processes, utilizing tools such as lasers, electronics and computers. Textiles begins with the 
synthesis of fibers by man or by nature; textiles are carried through many processes for 
fabric formation, including the steps necessary to make fabrics useful, such as the manu- 
facture of dyestuffs and colorants, chemical auxiliaries and finishes, and cutting and 
fashioning into end-use products. 

The approximately 5,000 graduates of the College of Textiles hold diverse positions, 
many in North Carolina. In the textile and related industries, occupations range from 
manufacturing management, sales, and corporate management to designing and styling, 
research and development, technical service, quality control and personnel management. 
These textile graduates are in the creative and management decision-making aspects of the 
industry. They plan the flow of materials, processes and information. They create new 
products and processes. They solve product and process problems. They create styles, 
designs, patterns, colors, textures, and structures for apparel, home and industrial uses. 
They engineer systems and products required of industrial, space, medical, apparel and 
other uses of textile products. They deal with computers, automation, product quality, plant 
performance and environmental problems. They manage large and small companies, 
personnel, and systems. 

The College of Textiles prepares its graduates for careers in these occupations. A broad 
background is stressed; two-thirds of the course work normally comes from other depart- 
ments of the university. Opportunities remain excellent, with the college maintaining one 
of the University's best placement records. Demand for textile graduates from North 
Carolina State University is particularly strong, due mainly to the strength of the academic 
programs. These programs are offered by two degree granting departments: Textile and 
Apparel Management, and Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science. 

CURRICULA 

The College of Textiles offers a broad choice of curricula from which to choose. Bachelor 
of Science programs in Textiles, Textile and Apparel Management, Textile Science and 
Textile Chemistry are available. These programs allow students to choose from a wide 
range of courses in addition to required core courses. A Bachelor of Science in Textile 
Engineering offered jointly by the College of Textiles and the College of Engineering, is 
also available. The textile student's curriculum includes humanities, social sciences and 
basic sciences and may include concentrations in business, economics, industrial engineer- 
ing, mathematics, physics, chemistry, computer science or statistics. A variety of dual 
degree possibilities are open to textile students, usually requiring at least 2 semesters 
additional study. 



262 



Inasmuch as professional textiles study is concentrated in the last two years of the 
student's program, it is possible for students from junior or community colleges, or other 
institutions of higher learning, to transfer to the College of Textiles with a minimum loss of 
time. 

FIELD TRIPS 

For certain textile courses, it is desirable for the student to see the manufacturing process 
under actual operating conditions. When possible, student groups visit outstanding manu- 
facturing plants. Trip participation is required; transportation costs and other travel 
expenses, while held to a minimum, are paid by the student. 

SUMMER EMPLOYMENT 

Job opportunities for summer employment are available for textile students. Placement 
assistance is available through the college placement office and frequently can be arranged 
in the student's home community. Qualified students may arrange to receive academic 
credit through the Summer Interm program. 

DEGREES 

Upon completion of programs in either textiles, textile and apparel management, textile 
science, textile chemistry or textile engineering, the degree of Bachelor of Science is 
conferred. 

The College of Textiles offers the following graduate degrees: Master of Textiles; Master 
of Science in Textiles, Master of Science in Textile Chemistry, and Doctor of Philosophy in 
Fiber and Polymer Science. For general requirements consult the Graduate Catalog. 

By faculty agreement candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in other schools of 
this University may specialize in textile-related subjects. In such cases, research is usually 
done in textiles. 

FOUR-ONE PROGRAM 

The College of Textiles has a program which permits a student with a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited college or university to complete the requirements for a Bache- 
lor of Science degree in textiles, textile and apparel management, textile science or textile 
chemistry after the satisfactory completion of a minimum of one year of study. 

Applicants should have completed basic economics, mathematics, physics and chemistry 
requirements comparable with those required for the textile degree sought. Under these 
conditions, the student generally may complete the degree requirements in two summer 
sessions and two regular semesters. Students not meeting specific requirements in business 
economics, sciences, or mathematics should remove deficiencies prior to entering a specific 
degree program, otherwise the program of study may require three or more semesters. 

Each applicant's undergraduate program is considered individually and, in general, a 
complete transfer of credits is possible. 

HONORS PROGRAM 

This program offers the exceptional student an opportunity to explore an area of special 
interest with exposure to various forms of research or independent study. Academically- 
promising entrants to the college, and students who show academic excellence during the 
freshman year, are assigned to honors advisers and are regarded as honors candidates. 
Special lectures, discussion groups and seminars in the freshman and sophomore years 
introduce the possibilities for future development in the honors program. Towards the end 
of the freshman year, selected honors candidates are invited to become full members of the 
honors program. In the sophomore year, with honors adviser's consent, honors students may 
begin to develop programs of strength in a special interest area. This may necessitate the 
substitution of preferred courses for those normally required, with the exception of certain 
basic textile courses. In the junior and senior year the student develops special interests. 



263 



culminating in an honors thesis. The honors thesis ranges from a scholarly review of a 
special topic to a discussion of an experimental research problem. 

HONOR SOCIETY 

Sigma Tau Sigma is the scholastic textile fraternity which was founded in the College of 
Textiles in 1929 to honor students who have a grade point average of 3.25 or higher. The 
main goal of this fraternity is to create a high standard of scholarship among textile 
students. Twice every year the local chapter selects as its prospective members junior 
textile students who meet the above criterion. Sigma Tau Sigma also promotes excellence 
by awarding a trophy to the graduating senior with the highest overall grade point average 
in the college. 

TEXTILE SCHOLARS-IN-RESIDENCE PROGRAM 

This program is sponsored by the College of Textiles and the Division of Student Affairs. 
It is a four-year program with emphasis on a textile seminar series and educational and 
cultural enrichment activities. These co-curricular activities include seminars on special 
topics related to the textile curriculum and profession, tutorial sessions, field trips and 
musical and drama performances. Students are invited to join this program after their 
acceptance at NCSU based on their predicted performance and must maintain a GPA of 3.0 
to continue. All students are housed together with upperclassmen living with freshmen 
whenever possible. 

ASSOCIATE OF THE TEXTILE INSTITUTE (ATI) DIPLOMA 

The Textile Institute with headquarters in Manchester, England is a prestigeous inter- 
national professional textile organization. This organization recognizes graduates from 
most of the College of Textiles programs who have achieved a GPA of 2.8 or higher. These 
graduates will be granted full exemption from the ATI examination. 

SCOTTISH COLLEGE OF TEXTILES EXCHANGE PROGRAM 

Selected students enrolled in the textile design concentration with junior standing are 
given the opportunity to spend the spring semester of the junior year at the Scottish College 
of Textiles while registered for textile design courses at NCSU. Tuition and fees are paid at 
the regular rate to NCSU. Travel costs for the selected students will be funded through the 
Louis Cramer Award in textile design which is administered by the College of Textiles. 
Each student will be responsible for costs of accommodations, meals and other personal 
needs. 

Similar arrangements are available for students of the Scottish College of Textiles. The 
total exchange program is limited to 12 credit hours. 

SILVER DESIGN MEDAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF ARTS, LONDON 

The Royal Society of Arts, London has selected North Carolina State University as one of 
the universities eligible to award its silver medal to one graduate each year. This award is 
given to a student who demonstrates excellence in the field of textile styling/design and is 
presented at the May commencement ceremonies. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Directors of the North Carolina Textile Foundation and friends of the College of 
Textiles have established an outstanding freshman scholarship program for textile majors: 

Textile Foundation Merit Awards — These scholarships are renewable for up to four years 
of study at $3,500 per year, constituting an overall award of $14,000. A tuition differential 
may be added to the award for an out-of-state student. Four recipients are chosen every 
year. 

Charles and Abraham Erlanger Merit Award— One renewable scholarship for $3,500 
per year, for a total award value of $14,000. 

264 



Charles A. Hayes Merit Award— One renewable scholarship for $3,500 per year, for a 
total award value of $14,000. 

Lineberger Merit Award— One renewable scholarship of $3,500 per year, for a total 
award value of $14,000. 

Textile Freshman Prestige Scholarships — Up to twenty of these scholarships will be 
awarded to members of each class. Ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 per year, these scholar- 
ships are renewable for up to four years. 

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

This is a voluntary program which combines academic study with job experience. To be 
eligible for the program, a student must have completed two semesters at NCSU (one 
semester for transfer students) and have a minimum GPA of 2.25. The program provides 
for alternating semesters of full-time study and full-time work. A minimum of three work 
periods is required to complete the program. 

FACILITIES 

The new College of Textiles became a reality in the spring of 1990. The Centennial 
Campus, which contains the new facility as well as other research and educational facilities, 
has now grown to approximately 1,000 acres. 

The North Carolina General Assembly allocated $27 million to build the College of 
Textiles facility and an additional $6 million for equipment modernization. The 298,000 
square foot facility has been planned by the faculty and staff at the college, in conjunction 
with a review process for recommendation and improvements from key industry represen- 
tatives. Space allocation for undergraduate programs is 34%, and for graduate and 
research program, 31%. The building plans call for new facilities for teaching and research 
since these two priorities are essential to strengthen the textile and allied industries in the 
U.S. 

The college will develop a Model Manufacturing Facility within the new building that is 
capable of extruding fiber; spinning, weaving/knitting and finishing fabric; producing 
nonwovens; and constructing garments. This facility will be the only one of its kind in the 
world dedicated to textile industry/academic sponsorship. One of the first projects will be to 
develop a total and complete CIM environment within its laboratories. 

The College of Textiles on the Centennial Campus will be the center for textile education 
and research in the U.S. Within its walls will be a critical mass of students, faculty, 
facilities, and programs that will "make a difference" for the U.S. fiber, textile, and apparel 
industries. 

SPECIAL SERVICES 

The College of Textiles offers several services and programs which enrich its academic 
programs. 

Textile and Apparel Research is conducted on a wide variety of problems relating to 
the fiber, textile and apparel industries. Frequently, the problems are interdisciplinary 
and involve team effort. Students have an opportunity to participate in the solution to 
current problems. 

Textiles Extension and Continuing Education is vigorously participated in by all 
faculty. It serves the needs of the textile industry by disseminating research findings and 
offering short courses for executive, scientific and supervisory personnel. The two-way 
exchange in these activities keeps students and faculty informed on all of the latest 
developments. 

The Office of Student Services is responsible for the placement and financial aid 
programs of the College of Textiles. The placement office brings together industry recruit- 
ers and students for interview sessions for permanent and summer employment. Alumni 
may also take advantage of the placement office. 

The financial aid function is operated by a committee. It is possible for any North 
Carolina student to pursue an education in textiles through scholarships, loans or grants, as 
long as he or she maintains the university's academic standards. 

265 



TEXTILE ENGINEERING, CHEMISTRY, 
AND SCIENCE 

College of Textiles (Room 3-250), Centennial Campus 

Professor C. D. Livengood, Head of the Department 

Professor B. S. Gupta, Assistant Head-Graduate Programs 

Professor K. R. Beck, Assistant Head-Graduate Programs 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: C. D. Livengood 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor and Abel C. Lineberger Professor: P. R. 
Lord 

Alumni Distinguished Graduate Professor: R. D. Gilbert 

Charles A. Cannon Professor: S. P. Hersh 

Cone Mills Professor: R. McGregor 

Celanese Corporation Professor: J. A. Cuculo 

Ciba-Geigy Professor: H. S. Freeman 

Professors: R. L. Barker, D. R. Buchanan, J. A. Cuculo, A. H. El-Shiekh, H. S. Freeman, P. L. Grady, S. P. Hersh, 
R. McGregor, G. N. Mock, M. H. Mohamed, M. H. Theil, C. Tomasino, P. A. Tucker; Adjunct Professors: A. Ciferri, 
R. Goldman, J. E. Hendrix, T. lijima, J. B. Levy. H. F. Mark, J. Preston. L. G. Roldan, A. Schindler, T. Tam; Professors 
Emeriti:]. F. Bogdan, K. S. Campbell, D. M. Gates. P. D. Emerson, T. W. George, R. D. Gilbert, D. S. Hamby, P. R. Lord. 
H. A. Rutherford, W. K. Walsh. W. M. Whaley, R. W. Work; Associate Professors: C. B. Smith; Adjunct Associate 
Professors: W. P. Behnke, L. D.Claxton. W. R. Martin, Jr., P. E. SsLSser. Associate Professors Emeriti T . H. Guion, A.C. 
Hayes, T. G. Rockow; AssistarU Professors: P. Banks- Lee, A. C. Bullerwell, T. G. Clapp, H. Hamouda. S. M. Hudson, C. 
M. Pastore, J. W.Rucker, J. P. Rust; /lssoctateMera6erso/f/ieFaft<ifj/.S.K.Batra (Textile and Apparel Management), 
R. E. Fornes (Physics). 

The Department of Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science offers bachelor of 
science degrees embracing a number of disciplines. Students receive a fundamental knowl- 
edge of the science and engineering involved in the production of polymers, fibers, yarns 
and fabrics, and products based on them, and the process of dyeing and finishing. 

The B.S. in Textile Chemistry is heavily oriented to the chemistry of polymers, their 
formation, and the preparation of textile materials for the consumer including scouring, 
bleaching, printing, dyeing and finishing. The degree program offers four different con- 
centrations: (a) dyeing and finishing management, (b) dyeing and finishing operations, (c) 
dyeing and finishing science, and (d) polymer chemistry. The first two concentrations are 
primarily for students who want a bachelor of science degree, whereas the other concentra- 
tions are oriented toward students wanting advanced studies. However, the student taking 
dyeing and finishing operations or dyeing and finishing management can use elective 
courses to achieve a background suitable for graduate studies. 

The B.S. in Textile Engineering provides a broad base of fundamental engineering 
courses as a foundation for studies in textile engineering. The textile engineering courses 
deal with the application of scientific and engineering principles to the design and control 
of all aspects of fiber, textile and apparel processes, products and machinery. These include 
natural and man-made materials, interaction of materials with machines, safety and 
health, energy conservation, and waste and pollution control. The B.S. in Textile Engineer- 
ing is offered jointly with the College of Engineering. See that college for curriculum 
display. 

The B.S. in Textile Science provides students with a fundamental knowledge of textile 
materials, including the science of modern materials and composites, as well as a technical 
understanding of the interactions between materials and machines in manufacturing 
operations. This curriculum combines elements of fiber physics, engineering, polymer 
science and production technology. It incorporates modern aspects of fiber material 



266 



science, including composites and advanced materials, computer applications and modern 
measurements into a science based program. 

B.S. DEGREE IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

DYEING AND FINISHING MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semest£r Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A or 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 Principles Chemistry 4 

CSC 200 Intro, to Comp. & Use 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B or 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 3-4 

TC 203 Intro, to Polymer Chemistry 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17-18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



CH 221 Organic Chem. I 4 

EB 201 Economics I 3 

PY211 College Physics I or 

PY 205 Physics Engr. Sci. I 4 

TC 301 Tech. Dye. Fin 4 

TS 211 Intro. Fiber Science 3 

li 



CH 223 Organic Chem. II 4 

PY212 College Physics II or 

PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II 4 

TC 310 Text. Prep. Fin. Chem 3 

TT 250 Text Fabric Form. Systems 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

Is 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

PSY 307 Indust. & Organ Psy 3 

TC320 Textile Dyeing & Printing 4 

TC 441 Theory of Phys. Chem. Proc. Tex. I 3 

TC 461 Intro, to Fiber-Form. Polymers 3 

TT 220 Yarn Prod. Systems 3 

Physical Education Electives 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC305 Intro. Color Sci. Appl 3 

TC 412 Textile Chem. Analysis 3 

TC 442 Theory of Phys. Chem. Proc. Text. II 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits 

ACC 280 Managerial Account 3 

TAM 380 Mgmt. Cont. Text Syst 3 



Humanities/Social Science Electives^ 6 

Textile Chemistry Elective' 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

TAM 480 Text Prod. Cost Cont 3 

TC 407 Pilot Oper. & QC 3 

TC491 Seminar in Textile Chem 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

'77 Textile Chemistry Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 131 

NOTE: Creditgainedfor MA 111 Precalculus will be considered asexcess credit and not applicable toward satisfying the 
132 minimum hours required for graduation. 

'Any TC elective course— 6 credits. 

^Humanities/Social Sciences Electives— University guidelines will be followed in that a minimum of 18 hours are 
required in addition to English 111 and 112. Six of these hours are specified: EB 201, Economics I, and PSY 307, 
Industrial and Organizational Psychology. Students are required to select at least six hours from humanities such as art 
and music (excluding skills courses), history, English, foreign languages (excluding FLE courses), philosophy, and 
religion. The final six hours can be selected from humanities or social sciences. 



267 



B.S. DEGREES IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

DYEING AND FINISHING OPERATIONS CONCENTRATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A or 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 107 Principles Chemistry 4 

CSC 200 Intro, to Comp. & Use 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B or 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 3-4 

TC 203 Intro, to Polymer Chem 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17^ 



Fall Semester 

CH 221 Organic Chem. I 4 

PY 21 1 College Physics I or 

PY 205 Physics Engr. Sci. I 4 

TC 301 Tech. Dye. Fin 4 

TS211 Intro. Fiber Science 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective* 3 

18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 223 Organic Chem. II 4 

PY 212 College Physics II or 

PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II 4 

TC 310 Text. Prep. Fin. Chem 3 

TT 250 Text. Fabric Form Systems 3 

Free Elective 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

Is 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

TC 320 Text. Dye & Print 4 

TC 441 Phys. Chem. Proc. Tex. I 3 

TC461 Intro, to Fiber-Form. Pol 3 

TT 220 Yarn Prod. Systems 3 

Humanities/Social Science Electives* 3 

Physical Education Electives 1 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 305 Intro. Color Sci. AppI 3 

TC 412 Text. Chem. Analysis 3 

TC 442 Phys. Chem. Proc. Text. II 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective* 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 



SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

Humanities/Social Science Electives 6 

Restricted Elective' 3 

TAM Elective^ 3 

TC Elective' 3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

TC 407 Pilot Oper. & QC 3 

TC491 Seminar in Textile Chem 1 

Humanities/Social Science Elective* 3 

TAM, TS, TT Elective^ 3 

TC Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

16 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 131 

NOTE: Credit gained for MA 111 Precalculus will be considered asexcess credit and not applicable toward satisfying the 
minimum hours required for graduation. 

'Any TC elective course— 6 credits. 

*Any TAM, TS or TT elective course— 6 credits. 

'Restricted elective: ST 361. CH elective. Math elective, ACC 280—3 credits. 

'Humanities and Social Sciences Electives— University guidelines will be followed in that a minimum of 18 hours are 

required in addition to English HI and 112. Selection will be from University-approved lists with at least six hours from 

humanities such as art and music (excluding skills courses), history, English, languages (excluding FLE courses), 

philosophy, and religion, and six hours from social sciences such as anthropology, economics, political science, psychology, 

sociology, and muitidisciplinary studies. The final six can be selected from either humanities or social sciences. 



268 



B.S. DEGREE IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

DYEING AND FINISHING SCIENCE CONCENTRATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles Chemistry 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 CSC 200 Intro, to Comp. & Use 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci ^ TC 203 Intro, to Polymer Chem 3 

~jT Physical Education Elective 1 

li 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 MA 341 Appl. Diff. Equat. I 3 

PY 205 Physics Engr. Sci. I 4 PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II 4 

TC301 Tech. Dyeing & Finishing 4 TC 310 Text. Prep. Fin. Chem 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Free Elective 3 

~7^ Physical Education Elective 1 

li 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TC 320 Text. Dye & Print 3 TC 305 Intro. Color. Sci. Appl 3 

TS211 Intro, to Fiber Sci 3 TC 412 Text. Chem. Analysis 3 

TT 250 Text. Fab. Form. Struc 3 TT 220 Yarn Prod. Systems 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective* 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective* 3 

Phys. Chem./Thermo. Elect.' ^ Phys. Chem./Thermo. Elect.' 3 

Is li 

SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TC 461 Intro, to Fib. Form. Pol 4 TC 407 Pilot Oper. & QC 3 

TC Elective^ 3 TC 491 Seminar in TC 1 

Humanities/Social Science Electives 6 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Electives 6 

Free Elective^ 3 Textile Chemistry Elective^ 3 



16 



Free Elective 3 

li 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 130* 

NOTE: Credit gained for MA 1 1 1 Precalculus will be considered as excess credit and not applicable toward satisfying the 
minimum hours required for graduation. 



'TC 441-442 or CH 431-433 

^Any T. TAM or TC polymer chemistry elective course— 6 credits 

^Any TC dyeing/finishing elective course— 3 credits 

*See Humanities/Soc. Sci. note following Dyeing & Finishing Operations Concentration. 

°D grades in ENG 111. CH 101, or MA 141 are not accepted toward graduation in Textile Chemistry. 

B.S. DEGREE IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 
POLYMER CHEMISTRY CONCENTRATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 TC 203 Intro, to Polymer Chem 3 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci ^ Physical Education Elective _M_ 

Is li 



269 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH221 Organic Chemistry I 4 CH 223 Organic Chemistry II 4 

MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 MA 341 Appl. Diff. Equat. I 3 

PY 205 Phvsics EngT. Sci. I 4 PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II 4 

TC301 Tech. Dyeing Finish 4 TS211 Intro, to Fiber Sci 3 

Physical Education Elective ^ Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

'TZ Physical Education Elective 1 

Is 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TC 461 Intro, to Fib. Form. Pol 4 TC 305 Intro. Color Sci. Appl 3 

TT220 Y'arn Prod. Systems 3 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

TT 250 Text. Fab. Form. Struc 3 Phys. Chem./Thermo. Elect.' 3 

Phys. Chem/Thermo Elect* 3 Physical Sci./Math Elective' 2-4 

Free Elective 3 Polymer Chem. Elect.^ 3 

16 14-16 

SENIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

Dyeing Finishing Elective^ 3 Dyeing Finishing Elect.^ 3 

Humanities/Social Science Electives' 6 Humanities/Social Science Elective' 6 

Polvmer Chemistry Elective' 6 Polymer Chem. Elect.' 3 

Free Elective 3 Textiles Elective* 1-3 



18 



Free Elective 3 

16-18 

Minimum Hours Required for Graduation 129 

NOTE: Credit gained for MA 1 1 1 Precalculus will be considered as excess credit and not applicable toward satisfying the 
130 minimum hours required for graduation. 

RESTRICTED ELECTIVES 

' Physical Science/Math Electives— 2-4 credits from the following: 

CH315 4 

CSC 101 3 

CSC 111 2 

ST 361 3 

^Dyeing and Finishing— 6 credits from the following: 

T401 3 

TC320 4 

TC412 3 

TC451 3 

TC491 1 

TC505 3 

TC520 3 

TC530 3 

TC591 3 

'Polymer Chemistry electives— nine credits from the following: 

T402 3 

TC504 3 

TC561 3 

TC562 3 

TC565 3 

TC569 3 

TC 591 (Polyrr.erUb Course) 3 

TS 460 3 

Three additional credits from either the list above or the following: 

TC490 1-6 

TC591 3 



270 



'Physical Chemistry/Thermodynamics— 6 credits from the following: 

CH431 3 

CH 433 3 

or 

TC441 3 

TC442 3 

^Textiles— 1-3 credits in TC, TAM. TT. TS. or T courses at 300-500 level (including any elective course in dyeing and 
finishing or polymer chemistry listed above). 
*See Humanities/Social Sciences note following Dyeing and Finishing Operations Concentration. 

MINOR IN TEXTILE CHEMISTRY 

The Textile Engineering, Chemistry, and Science Department offers a minor in textile 
chemistry to majors in any field except Textile Chemistry. The program is designed to 
expose students to the technical and scholarly disciplines of polymer chemistry, fiber 
formation, color physics, dyeing, and chemical modification of fabrics, and gives them an 
opportunity to learn how basic disciplines are applied in an industrial environment. Any 
interested student should contact the assistant department head of Textile Engineering, 
Chemistry, and Science for information about the minor and its prerequisites. 

B. S. DEGREE IN TEXTILE ENGINEERING 

See Textile Engineering curriculum under College of Engineering. 

B.S. DEGREE IN TEXTILE SCIENCE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci ._^ 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

CH 103 General Chemistry II or 
CH 105 Chem. Princ. & Applic. or 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 3-4 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

TT 220 Yarn Product Systems 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17-18 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester 



Credits 



Spring Semester 



Credits 



MA 242 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Ill 4 

PY 205 Physics Engr. & Sci. I 4 

TC 203 Intro, to Polymer Chem 3 

TT 250 Text. Fab. Form. Struct 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

18 



MA 341 Applied Diff. Equations I 3 

PY 208 Physics Engr. & Sci. II 4 

ST 361 Intro, to Stat. Engrs.' 3 

TC 301 Tech. of Dyeing & Finish 4 

TS 211 Intro, to Fiber Science 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

18 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CSC 111 Algorithmic Lang. I 2 

TT 330 Text. Meas. Qual. Cont 4 

TT341 Knitting Svst.3 or 

TT351 Weaving Syst.3 3 

Restricted Electives* 6 

Free Elective 3 

Is 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 331 Comm. Engr. Tech 3 

TT 305 Dir. Fiber-Fab. Prod.^ or 
TT 320 Mech. Sp. Yn. Mfg. Sys. or 

TT 420 Mod. Dev. Yn. Mfg.' 3-4 

TT 351 Weaving Syst.' 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Restricted Electives* 5 

17-18 



271 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TS 460 Phy. Prop, of Text. Fib 3 TS 461 Mech. Prop. Fib. Struc 3 

Humanities/Social Science Electives^ 6 TT 425 Text. Yn. Prod. & Prop.' or 

Restricted Elective* 3 TT 420 Mod. Dev. Yn. Mfg.' 3 

Free Elective 3 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 



15 



Restricted Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

15 

Minimum Hours for Graduation 133 

Note: Credit gained for MA 11 1. Precalculus, will be considered as excess credit and not applicable toward satisfying the 
133 minimum hours required for graduation. 

'ST 361(T) recommended for Textile students 

^Humanities/Social Science Electives— 18 hours are required in addition to English 111 and 112. Three hours are 
specified: EB 201. The remaining courses will be selected from a University-approved lists with a minimum of two 
electives in a graded sequence from the social sciences electives and two courses in a graded sequence from the humanities 
electives. A graded sequence is defined as (a) A two-course sequence in which the first course is a prerequisite to the 
second, or (b) A two-course sequence in which the second course is at the 300 level or higher. 

'Textile Electives— 12(13) hours 

a. TT 320 4 

TT 420 3 

TT 425 3 

b. TT 305 3 

TT 351 3 

TT341 3 

'Restricted Electives— 17 hours 

The restrictive electives are designed to give the student a greater science base in one or more areas. The 17 hours will 
be chosen from two or more of the groups of courses listed below. Maximum of 12 hours allowed from group F. 
Students are encouraged to elect TMT 380 from among the restricted electives. 

Some of the courses listed here have prerequisites which have not been specified in the detailed curriculum. They 
may be taken by the students either as free electives or for extra credit. 

A. Math & Statistics 
300 level and above 

B. Mech. & Mat. Engr. 
200 level and above 

C. Physics 
300 level and above 

D. Computer Science 
Any course except CSC 200 

E. Chemistry 
200 level and above 

F. Advanced Textiles and Operations 

a. Textile (TS, TT, TAM. TC, T) courses; i.e. TT 305, TT 341, TT 
351, TAM 380, TC 320, and any TT, TAM, TC or T course at 
the 400 level and above. 

b. IE courses at 300 level or above except IE 301, 340, 341. 345 
or 346. 

c. EB course: 301, 302, 320, 404. 422. 451 and all 500 level 
courses. 



272 



TEXTILE AND APPAREL MANAGEMENT 

College of Textiles (Room 3-245), Centennial Campus 

Professor T. J. Little, Head of the Department 

Alumni Distinguished Undergraduate Professor: M. L. Robinson 

Professors: R. A. Earnhardt. S. K. Batra. G. A. Berkstresser. R. A. Donaldson, A. H. M. El-Shiekh. T. J. Little, M. H. 
Mohamed: Adjunct Professor: W. A. Klopman: Professors Emeriti: E. B. Grover, A. B. Moss. J. A. Porter. W. E. Shinn, 
W. C. Stucky: Associate Professors: T. F. Gilmore. P. B. Hudson. L, T. Lassiter. M. L. Robinson. G. W. Smith. M. W. Suh; 
Adjunct Associate Professors: D. M. Powell. D. L. Spanton. S. M. Zartarian; Visiting Associate Professors: M. J. Gerra. 
N. A. Hunter, E. M. McPherson; Associate Professors Emeriti: E. H. Bradford. E. E. Hutchinson. J. W. Klibbe. W. E. 
Moser. J. W. Pardue: Assistant Professors: P. Banks-Lee. H. Hergeth. G. L. Hodge. F. W. Massey; Adjunct Assistant 
Professor: R. H. Johnson: Visiting Assistant Professor: T. K. Ghosh: Assistant Professor Emeriti: H. M. Middleton; 
Extension Specialists: H. M. Alien. W. J. Carter. L. S. Moser. C. L. Seastrunk: Research Assistant: E. C. Carrere. W. C. 
Hewitt. 

The Department of Textile and Apparel Management offers bachelor of science degrees 
in Textile and Apparel Management and in Textiles. Each degree permits the student to 
specialize in concentrations and the curricula combine a foundation both in textile man- 
agement and textile technology principles and applications. The BS Textile and Apparel 
Management degree has a Management concentration and an Apparel concentration, 
while the BS Textiles degree has a Technology concentration and a Design concentration. 

The BS in Textile and Apparel Management, together with its concentrations, provides 
opportunities for the student to get additional background in apparel manufacturing, 
production factors, law and labor relations, management science, mathematics, finance, 
accounting, dyeing and finishing, textile design and textile technology. 

The BS in Textiles, Technology concentration, offers the student a background in the 
technology of fibers, yarns and fabrics and the manufacturing processes involved. The 
Design concentration gives a broad foundation in textiles and specializes in the application 
of design principles to the wide range of textile materials. 

Opportunities for outstanding undergraduate students are allowed in graduate studies 
including research sponsored by University funds and industrial and government 
sponsors. 

The Textile and Apparel Management department also administrates the Eli Whitney 
Scholarship program for students wishing to undertake a study of international business in 
conjunction with their textile studies. This program permits the student to earn a BA 
degree as offered by the College of Humanities and Social Science and a BS degree in 
Textile and Apparel Management. 

B.S. DEGREE IN TEXTILES, TEXTILE DESIGN CONCENTRATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

Eall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CSC 200 Intro. Comput. & Use^ 3 

ENG 111 Comp. & Rhetoric 3 ENG 112 Comp. & Reading 3 

MA 131 Analy. Geom. Calc. A or MA 231 Analy. Geom. & Calc. B or 

MA 141 Analy. Geom. & Calc. I 4 MA241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 3-4 

PE 100 Health & Phys. Fit 1 TAM 170 Textile Design Orient 1 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci 3 TT 220 Yarn Prod. Systems 3 



15 



Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17-18 



273 



Fait Semester 

DF 101 Desig-n Fund. P or 

DF 111 Two Dim. Design 6-3 

PY 205 Physics Engr. Sci. I or 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

TC 203 Intro. Polymer Chem. or 

TS 211 Intro. Fiber Sci 3 

TT 250 Text. Fab. Form Struc 3 

Humanities/Social Science (EB 301)' 3 

Physical Education Elective ■ 1 

17-20 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Credits Spring Semester Credits 

PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II or 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

ST 361T Intro. Stat. Engrs 3 

TAM 272 Print Text. Design 3 

TC 203 Intro. Polymer Chem. or 

TS 211 Intro. Fiber Sci 3 

TT341 Knitting Systems 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

TAM 330 Text. Meas. Qual. Cont 4 

TAM 371 Woven Text. Design 3 

TC 301 Tech. Dyeing Fin 4 

TT 351 Weaving Systems 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elect ■ 3 

17 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 331 Commun. Engr. & Tech 3 

TAM 372 Knitted Text. Design 3 

TAM 380 Mgmt. Contr. Text. Syst 3 

TT 305 Dir. Fib. Fab. Prod 3 

TT320 Mech. Sp. Yarn Mfg. Sys ^ 



T 493 Industrial Internship in Textiles' 

SENIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

TAM 470 Text. Design Studio 6 

T 495 Senior Seminar 1 

TT 425 Text. Yarn Prod. Prop 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 



Spring Semester Credits 

TS 460 Phys. Prop. Text. Fib 3 

TT 370 Tech. Fabric Design 4 

Free Electives 6 

Humanities/Social Science Elective' 6 

New York Trip' 

19 
Minimum Hours for Graduation 133 



NOTE: 1. Credit gained for MA 111, Precalculus, will be considered as excess and not applicable toward satisfying the 
133 minimum hours required for graduation. 

'Humanities/Social Sciences Electives 

A minimum of 18 hours are required in addition to English HI and 112. Selection will follow University guidelines and 
come from University-approved course lists. At least 6 hours of humanities are required. At least 6 hours of social 
sciences are required. EB 201 is specified as one of these courses. A two-course graded sequence in the same discipline is 
required in either humanities or in social sciences. A graded sequence is defined as: a) A two-course sequence in which 
the first course is prerequisite to the second, or b) A two-course sequence in which the second course is at the 300 level or 
higher. The remaining hours will come from either humanities, social sciences or both. 

2DF 101 DESIGN FUNDAMENTALS I (6 credits): Open only to textile students with a 2.5 GPA plus acceptable 
portfolio, and who have been accepted into the course by the recommendation of the School of Design interview panel. 
This course is an elected alternative to DF 111 for certain students who meet the entry requirements. An excess of 3 
credits will be incurred, and special curricular arrangements will have to be made in consonance with the academic 
coordinator of the student's department. 

'Computer Science - TDC students may elect to take DN 4 15 Microcomputer Graphics for Designers - (3 credits) in lieu of 
CSC 200. 

•Summer Internship - students are encouraged to apply for an industrial internship, between their junior and senior 
years. The program number to sign up for is T 493. This is an optional course and will come from free electives. 

'NEW YORK TRIP - during spring break of the senior year, a 6-day program of professional visits is arranged in the 
city. This is a very important partof the program of study, and all students are strongly encouraged to plan ahead for 
this event. 



274 



B.S. DEGREE IN TEXTILES, TEXTILE TECHNOLOGY CONCENTRATION 

FRESHMAN YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 CH 103 General Chemistry II or 

ENGlll Composition & Rhetoric 3 CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A or ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B or 

PE 100 Health & Physical Fitness 1 MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 3.4 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci 3 TT 220 Yarn Prod. Systems 3 

"77 Humanities/Soc. Sci. Elective'' 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17-18 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Use 3 PY 212 College Physics I or 

EB 20P Economics I 3 PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II 4 

PY 211 College Physics I or ST 361 Intro. Stat, for Engrs.' 3 

PY 205 Physics Engr. Sci. I 4 TC 203 Intro, to Polym. Chem. or 

TC 203 Intro, to Polymer Chem. or TS 211 Intro, to Fiber Sci 3 

TS 211 Intro, to Fiber Sci 3 TT 320 Mech. Sp. Yn. Mfg. Syst 4 

TT250 Text. Fab. Form. Struc 3 TT341 Knitting Systems 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 Physical Education 1 

1? li 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TAM 330 Text. Meas. & Qual. Cont 4 ENG 331 Comm. Engr. Tech 3 

TC 301 Tech. Dyeing & Finish 4 TAM 380 Mgmt. & Cont. of Text. Syst 3 

TT351 Weaving Systems 3 TT 305 Dir. Fiber to Fab. Prod 3 

TT 425 Text. Yarn Prod. & Prop 3 TT 370 Technical Fabric Design 4 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. Electives^ 3 Textile Concentration^ 3 

~TZ Free Elective 3 

19 
SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits Spring Semester Credits 

TS 460 Phy. Prop, of Text. Fib 3 Humanities/Social Science Electives^ 6 

TT 495 Senior Seminar 1 Textile Concentration' 6 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 Free Elective 3 

Textile Concentration' 6 "jT 

Free Elective 3 ^^ 

16 Minimum Hours for Graduation 134 

Note: Credit gained for MA 111 will be considered as excess credit and not applicable toward satisfying the 131 
minimum hours required for graduation. 

'ST 361 (T) recommended for Textile students 

^Humanities/Social Science Electives— A minimum of 18 hours are required in addition to English 111 and 1 12. Selection 
will follow University guidelines and come from University-approved course lists. At least 6 hours in humanities and 6 
hours in social sciences are required; EB 201 is a specified social science course. A two-course graded sequence in the same 
discipline is required in either humanities or social sciences. A graded sequence is defined as: (a) A two-course sequence in 
which the first course is prerequisite to the second, or (b) A two-course sequence in which the second course is at the 300 
level or higher. The remaining hours will come from either humanities or social sciences or both. 

^Textile Concentrations (15 credit hours) 

Select 9 credit hours from one group, either group A or group B, and 6 additional hours from any of the groups. (Credit will 

not be allowed for both TAM (PD) 371 and TT 451.) 

ABC 

Mfg. Tech. Quality Control Color & Design 

TT405 3 IE 352 3 TAM 371 3 

TT 420 3 TAM 431 3 TAM 372 3 

TT 443 3 TAM 490 3 TC 305 3 

TT 450 3 TAM 530 3 TT 350 3 

TT 451 3 TES 500 3 

TT490 3 



275 



D 

Apparel Tech. 

TAM215 3 

TAM315 3 

TAM316 3 



E 
Fiber Science 

CH 220 4 

T 402 3 

TC412 3 

TS461 3 



F 

Mfft. Science 

ACC 280 3 

TAM381 3 

TAM 480 3 

TAM 487 3 



B. S. DEGREE IN TEXTILE AND APPAREL MANAGEMENT, 
APPAREL MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENGlll Comp. & Rhetoric 3 

MA 131 Anaiy. Geom. Calc. A or 

MA 141 Analy. Geom. & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Health & Phys. Fit 1 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci _3 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. (EB 201F 3 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. B or 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 3-4 

T 203 Intro. Polymer Chemistry 3 

TT 220 Yarn Prod. Systems 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CSC 101 Intro, to Program or 
CSC 1 1 1 Intro. Fortran Prog, or 

CSC 200 Intro. Computer & Use 2-3 

PY 205 Physics Engr. Sci. I or 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

TT 250 Text. Fab. Form Struc 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. (EB SOlp 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16-17 



Spring Semester Credits 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 

PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II or 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

ST 361T Intro. Stat. Engrs.' 3 

TAM 215 Intro. Apparel Tech 3 

TS 211 Intro. Fiber Sci 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



JUNIOR YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

EB 302 Inter. Macroeconomics 3 

TAM 315 Apparel Product I 3 

TAM 331 Qua. Ctr. Tx. Prod. Mgt 3 

TAM 380 Mgmt. Cont. Text. Syst 3 

TC 301 Tech. Dye. Fin 4 

Free Elective 3 

19 



Credits 



Spring Semester 

EB 313 Marketing Methods or 

TAM 382 Prin. Soft Goods Mkt 3 

EB 320 Financial Manage 3 

ENG 331 Commun. Engr. & Tech 3 

TAM 316 Apparel Product II 3 

TAM 480 Text. Prod. Cost Cont 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. (PSY 307)^ _3 

18 



SENIOR YEAR 
Fall Semester Credits 
IE 352 Work Analy. and Design 3 



TAM 431 Fab. Perform Test 3 

TAM 482 Text. Mkt. Management 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Textile Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

Is 



Spring Semester Credits 

TAM 484 Mgt. Dec. Mak. Text. Firm 3 

Humanities/Social Science Elective^ 3 

Textile Elective^ 3 

Textile Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

Is 

Minimum Hours for Graduation 134 



NOTE: 1. Credit trained for MA 111, Algebra and Trigonometry, will be considered as excess and not applicable toward 
satisfying the 134 minimum hours required for graduation. 
2. A minimum grade of C is required in EB 201, TAM 380, and ACC 280. 



276 



'ST 361T Recommended for Textile students (see Schedule of Classes) 

^Humanities/Social Sciences Electives 

University guidelines will be followed in that a minimum of 18 hours are required in addition to English 111 and 112. 
Selection will be from University-approved lists with at least 6 hours from humanities and at least 6 hours from social 
sciences. In this curriculum EB 201. Economics I, EB 301, Intermediate Microeconomics, and PSY 307, Industrial and 
Organizational Psychology, are required. These courses satisfy University requirements of a minimum of 6 hours in 
social sciences, and also the departmental requirement of a two course graded sequence in the same discipline. A graded 
sequence is defined as a) A two course sequences in which the first course is prerequisite to the second, or b) A two course 
sequence in which the second course is at the 300 level or higher. At least 6 of the remaining hours must be selected from 
the humanities area. The final 3 hours can be selected from humanities or social sciences. 

^Textile Electives - 12-13 hours. 

Students have the option of selecting four courses, two from each grouping shown. 

A. TT 305 - 3 B. TAM 383 -3 C. TS 460 - 3 

TT320-4 TT351-3 TT 420 - 3 

TT341-3 TT370-4 TT 425 - 3 

TAM 431 - 3 (Required for Apparel Manufacturing and Management Concentration. 

B.S. DEGREE IN TEXTILE AND APPAREL MANAGEMENT, 
TEXTILE MANAGEMENT CONCENTRATION 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



Fail Semester Credits 

CH 101 General Chemistry I 4 

ENG 111 Composition & Rhetoric 3 

MA 131 Analytic Geometry & Calc. A or 4 

MA 141 Analytic Geometry & Calc. I 4 

PE 100 Physical Education 1 

T 105 Intro. Text. Mat. Sci ^ 

15 



Spring Semester Credits 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

MA 231 Analytic Geometry & Calc. Bor 3 

MA 241 Analytic Geometry & Calc. II 4 

T 203 Intro. Polymer Chemistry 3 

TT 220 Yarn Prod. Systems 3 

Humanities/Soc. Sci. (EB 201)^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16-17 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 



Fall Semester Credits 

CSC 101 Intro, to Program or 
CSC 111 Intro. Fortran Prog, or 

CSC 200 Intro, to Computers & Use 2-3 

PY 205 Physics Engr. Sci. I or 4 

PY 211 College Physics I 4 

TT 250 Text. Fab. Form Struc 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. (EB 301)2 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

16-17 



Spring Semester Credits 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting 3 

PY 208 Physics Engr. Sci. II or 

PY 212 College Physics II 4 

ST 361' Intro. Stat. Engrs 3 

TAM 380 Mgmt. Cont. Text. Syst 3 

TS 211 Intro. Fiber Science 3 

Physical Education Elective 1 

17 



Fall Semester Credits 

EB 302 Inter Macroeconomics 3 

ENG 331 Commun. Engr. & Tech 3 

TAM 331 Qua. Ctr. Tx. Prod. Mgt 3 

TC 301 Tech. Dye. Fin 4 

Management Elective^ 3 

Free Elective 3 

19 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Spring Semester Credits 

EB 313 Marketing Methods or 3 

TAM 382 Prin. Soft Goods Mkt 3 

EB 320 Financial Manage 3 

TAM 480 Text. Prod. Cost Cont 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. (PSY 307)^ 3 

Textile Elective^ 3 

Textile Elective^ ^ 

18 



Fall Semester 

TAM 482 Text. Mkt. Management 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. Elective^ 3 

Management Elective* 3 

Textile Elective' 3 

Free Elective 3 

li 



SENIOR YEAR 
Credits Spring Semester 



Credits 

TAM 484 Mgt. Dec. Mak. Text. Firm 3 

Hum/Soc. Sci. Electives^ 3 

Management Elective* 3 

Textile Elective' 3 

Free Elective -^ 

15 

Minimum Hours for Graduation 131 



277 



NOTE: 1. Credit gained for MA 1 11. Algebra and Trigonometry, will be considered as excess and not applicable toward 
satisfying the 131 minimum hours required for graduation. 

2. A minimum grade of C is required in EB 201. TAM 380. and ACC 280. 
'ST 361 (T) Recommended for Textile students (see Schedule of Classes) 

2Humanities/Social Sciences Electives ,.,,,, ,,,„ 

University guidelines will be followed in that a minimum of 18 hours are required in addition to English 1 11 and 1 U. 
Selection will be from University-approved lists with at least 6 hours from humanities and at least 6 hours from social 
sciences. In this curriculum EB 201 . Economics I, EB 301. Intermediate Microeconomics, and PSY 307. Industrial and 
Organizational Psychology, are required. These courses satisfy University requirements of a minimum of 6 hours in 
social sciences, and also the departmental requirement of a two-course graded sequence in the same discipline. A 
graded sequence is defined as a) A two-course sequence in which the first course is prerequisite to the second, or b) A 
two-course sequence in which the second course is at the 300 level or higher. At least 6 of the remaining hours must be 
selected from the humanities area. The final 3 hours can be selected from humanities or social sciences. 

'Textile Electives - 12-13 hours. 

Students have the option of selecting four courses, two from each grouping shown. 

C. 
TAM 431 .. 3 



A. 
TT305 
TT320 
TT341 



TAM 383 
TT351 .. 
TT370 .. 



TS460 
TT420 
TT425 



.. 3 
.. 3 
.. 3 



'MANAGEMENT ELECTIVES-9-12 hours. 

The management component of this curriculum is expanded to include a sequence of courses from one of the following 
groupings: 



Production 
Factors 

IE 307 3 

IE 311 3 

IE 353 3 

IE 355 3 

IE 420 3 

IE 421 3 

PSY 340 3 

T401 3 

TT420 3 



Law and Labor 
Relations 

EB307 3 

EB308 3 

EB326 3 

EB332 3 

EB431 3 

IE 355 3 

PSY 340 3 

T401 3 

TAM 381 .... 3 
TAM 487 .... 3 



[Eyeing and 
Apparel Finishing 

TAM 215.... 3 CH220 .... 4 TC 320 
TAM 216.... 3 TC310 .... 3 TC 407 
TAM 315 .... 3 
TAM 316 .... 3 



Management 
Science Math 

MA 242 4 

MA 341 3 

MA 405 3 

MA 421 3 

MA 425 3 

MA 426 3 

MA511 3 

MA 512 3 

ST 421 3 

ST 422 3 



Finance 
Accounting 



ACC 210 3 

ACC 220 3 

ACC 310 3 

ACC 311 3 

ACC 320 3 

ACC 420 3 

IE 307 3 

IE 311 3 

IE 420 3 



EB350 3 

EB404 3 

EB422 3 

EB448 3 

EB451 3 



Teiiile Design 

DFIU 3 

TAM/PD272 .... 3 
TAM/PD371 .... 3 
TAM/PD372 .... 3 



Textile Operations 

TS460 3 TT425 3 

TS461 3 TT443 3 

TT405 3 TT450 3 

TT420 3 TT451 3 



^Dyeing and Finishing— Some courses require prerequisites which may not have been taken as partof the degree program. 
Textile Design— Students electing this sequence must take all four courses. 



^PTsrm 




COLLEGE OF VETERINARY 
MEDICINE 

T. M. Curtin, Dean 

R. B. Ford, Associate Dean and Director of Veterinary Services 

D. R. Howard, Associate Dean and Director of Academic Affairs 

C. E. Stevens, Associate Dean and Director of Graduate Studies & Research 

C. A. McPherson, Director of Laboratory Animal Resources 

No specific undergraduate degree track is associated with a pre-professional veterinary 
medicine program. However, faculty members from the College of Veterinary Medicine 
and the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences serve as advisors to undergraduate 
students enrolled and pursuing a baccalaureate program usually in a science related field. 
Pre-professional course requirements are listed below. After completion of the required 
courses, students may be eligible to apply for the professional veterinary program. Course 
requirements may be changed annually and are determined by the Committee on Admis- 
sions in the College of Veterinary Medicine. For further information about admissions 
requirements and the professional program contact the College of Veterinary Medicine 
Office of Admissions (4700 Hillsborough St., 919-829-4200 or 4205). 

Undergraduate applicants with interests in veterinary medicine enrolled in the under- 
graduate programs at North Carolina State University at Raleigh are expected to be 
pursuing a baccalaureate degree (to include the social science and humanities requirements 
in the appropriate curriculum). Minimum requirements and course stipulations for cur- 
riculum planning should be followed through each of the departments or schools offering 
the appropriate degree. It is the responsibility of the students and their pre-professional 
advisors to be knowledgeable of those requirements. 

All courses listed below should be completed by the applications deadline, except nutri- 
tion* and biochemistry* which must be completed by the summer prior to entry. 

PRE-PROFESSIONAL COURSE REQUIREMENTS 

Credits 
Languages (6 Credits) 

ENG 111 ' Composition & Rhetoric 3 

ENG 112 Composition & Reading 3 

Physical Sciences (iS Credits) 

*BCH 451 Elementary Biochemistry 3 

CH 101 General Chemistry 4 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry 4 

CH 221. 223 Organic Chemistry I. II 8 

MA 131 Analytical Geometry & Calculus A 4 

or, you may substitute MA 121 for MA 131 

MA 121 Elements of Calculus 4 

PY 211. 212 General Phvsics or 8 

PY 221 College Physics 5 

ST 311 Introduction to Statistics 3 

Biological Sciences (li-15 Credits) 

*ANS 204 Livestock Feeds and Feeding 4 

or. you may substitute one of the following 
♦ANS (NTR. PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition or 

•NTR 301 Modern Nutrition 3 

BS 100 General Biology 4 

GN 411 The Principles of Genetics 3 

MB 401 General Microbiology 4 



279 



Humanities and Social Science (1 2 Credits) 

Humanities Electives 6 

Social Science Electives 6 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAM & CAREER OPPORTUNITIES 

Veterinary medicine is a science career dealing with the recognition, treatment, control 
and prevention of diseases in animals. Career options are unlimited and variable as animal 
health impacts upon the health and economic welfare of the nation. DVM candidates may 
select several career options upon graduation. Federal government, private industry, 
private practice, and research and teaching activities in a university setting are all possible 
for graduates and licensed doctors of veterinary medicine. Successful completion of the 
professional training program should prepare students for appropriate state licensing 
examination in the state of North Carolina and others. Persons interested in the profes- 
sional courses offered may receive a brochure by contacting the College of Veterinary 
Medicine. 

ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 
AND RADIOLOGY 

Professor A. L. Aronson, Head of the Department 
Alumni Distinguished Professor: J. B. Smallwood 
Burroughs Wellcome Professor: P. Bentley 

Professors: K. B. Adler, R. A. Argenzio, P.J. Bentley. N. C. Olson. J. E. Riviere. J. E. Smallwood. C. S. Teng. D. E. Thrall; 
Adjunct Professor: G. L. Fisher. L. M. Jones, D. W. Powell. B. A. Schwetz. F. Welsch. R. S. H. Yang: Associate Professor: 
S. A. Bai. C. F. Brownie. L. N. Fleisher, L. C. Hudson. R. E. Meyer. C. L. Robinette. P. L. Sannes: Adjunct Associate 
Professor: W. J. Croom. Jr.. T. E. Eling, S. Grosshandler, M. S. Hand. M. Negishi. J. A, Raleigh. C. T. Teng, R. D. 
Voyksner: Assistant Professor: H. M. Berschneider. J. E. Gadsby. P. W. Hellyer, B. P. Peters. I. W. Smoak. K. A. 
Spaulding, C. R. Swanson; Adjunct Assistant Professor: M. W. Dewhirst; Visiting Assistant Professor: D. P. Aucoin. B. 
R. Grubb. L. J. Konde. M. C. McGahan. N. A, Monteiro. M. B. Whiteley, P. L. Williams: Instructor: B. D. Hansen. 

COMPANION ANIMAL AND 
SPECIAL SPECIES MEDICINE 

Professor M. K. Stoskopf, Head of the Department 

Professors: C. W. Betts. E. B. Breitschwerdt. R. B. Ford. J. N. Kornegay. C. M. McPherson. E. A. Stone, M. K. Stoskopf; 
Adjunct Professors: S. W. Crane: Associate Professors: P. J. Armstrong, C. E. Atkins. S. E. Bunch, D. J. DeYoung, R. B. 
Ford. T. 0. Manning, M. P. Nasisse, E. J. Noga. R. L. Page. D. C. Richardson. M. S. Young: Adjuytct Associate 
Professors: D. I. Hammer. K. G. Kagan. N. A. V/^ison; Assistant Professors: D. E. Bevier. M. E. Davidson. K. Flammer. 
E. M. Hardie, B. W. Keene. S. J. Wheeler; Adjunct Assistant Professors: H. M. Aberman. R. J. Bartlett, D. Harling. R. 
W. Torgerson: Ittstructors: A. L. Hopkins, K. H. Taylor. P. S. Snyder, M. C. McEntee; Adjunct Instructor: P. S. Kuder; 
Associate Members of the Faculty: C. F. Abrams, Jr. (Agricultural Engineering). 

FOOD ANIMAL AND EOUINE 
MEDICINE 

Professor M. C. Roberts, Acting Head of the Department 

Professors: H.J. Barnes. J. Fetrow, B. S. Harrington, W. D. Oxender; Associate Professors: K. Anderson. K. F. Bowman, 
E. Hunt. D. Ley, J.Tate, S. Van Camp, D. P. Wages, M. Whitacre:/ld/uncM.s,socia<e/'ro/c.s.sor.s.S. Galphin. L. Munger, 
S. Schmittle; Assistant Professors: G. Almond. B. Breuhaus, D. Bristol. W. Duckett, M. Ficken, S. Fleming, M. McCaw, 
B. Slenning. C. Uhlinger: Research Assistant: B. Tilley: Associate Status: D. Rives (Extension Specialist in Poultry 
Science). 



280 



MICROBIOLOGY, PATHOLOGY, AND 
PARASITOLOGY 

Professor L. Coggins, Head of the Department 
Alumni Distinguished Professor: R. C. Dillman 

Professors: H. A. Berkhoff, T. T. Brown. P. B. Carter. W. T. Corbett. E. V. DeBuysscher, R. C. Dillman. B. Hammerberg, 

D. J. Meuten. D. J. Moncol. J. Stevens. W. Tompkins: Adjunct Professor: J. K. Atwell; Professor Emeritus: E. G. Batte; 
Associate Professors: P. Cowen. J. M. Cullen. F.J. Fuller. C. Grindem. J. Guy. J. F. Levine, M. B. Levy. P. Orndorff. S. L. 
TonWonogy: Adjunct Associate Professors: J . K. Atwell. G. Boorman. J. F. Hardisty, W. F. MacKenize. R. Maronpot. E. 

E. McConnell. R. Peiffer. J. A. Popp: Assistant Professors: R. Cattley. B. Sherry. M. Tompkins. D. Weinstock; Adjunct 
Assistaiit Professor: R. Cattley, J. Everitt. 




-i^ 



OTHER ACADEMIC AND 
ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS 



Music Department 

Price Music Center 

R. J. Toering, Director of Music 

Asxixtant Directors: F. M. Hammond, J. C. Kramer. M. S. Lynch. R. B. Fetters. A. E. Sturgis. P. H. Vogel, E. B. Ward: 
Mw<idan-in-Reifidence: filled by a new appointment each year 

The Music Department at North Carolina State University is committed to providing 
students with a broad-based education that not only prepares students for a career but also 
supplies them with aesthetic values that stimulate creative activities and enrich their 
personal lives. Through a variety of musical experiences, the department seeks to help 
students develop their musical insight, improve their musical skills, and cultivate their 
ability to perceive and respond to the beauty of music and the excitement it brings to life. 

Opportunities for direct student participation as performers include many instrumental 
and choral organizations, which are described in more detail under "Student Activities." 
Membership in any musical organization is open to students with a disciplined interest in 
music. Auditions are scheduled during orientation activities, at the beginning of each 
academic semester, and by personal appointment with directors of particular musical 
organizations. For further information, please consult the Music Office. 

Academic credit as well as aesthetic appreciation are available through a large number 
of courses, most of which may be taken to fulfill humanities elective requirements in any 
undergraduate curriculum. Any of these courses may be taken as free electives. Music 
Department courses are described in greater detail in the "Course Description" section of 
the catalog under the indicated course prefix. 

The department also serves as a cultural resource for the University community and the 
public at large through a variety of concerts presented by student musical organizations, 
departmental performers, and visiting artists. Concerts are open to all students 
free-of-charge. 

Military Education and Training 

The Department of Military Science (Army ROTC) and the Department of Aerospace 
Studies (Air Force ROTC) are separate academic and administrative subdivisions of the 
institution. Naval Science (Naval ROTC) is available through a cross-enrollment agree- 
ment with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Students in the ROTC programs 
will receive free elective credit for Aerospace Studies (AS), Military Science (MS), or Naval 
Science (NS) courses up to the limit of free electives in their curriculum. 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY SCIENCE (ARMY ROTC) 

Professor: Lieutenant Colonel H. K. Fisher, Jr. 

Imtructors: Captain W. G. Bickel. Captain J. M. Borland. Captain N. A. Fortuin. Captain W. A. Gregory. Captain H. J. 
Rogers, Captain S. L. Sharp. 

Mission. The mission of the Army ROTC Program is to train college men and women to 
become commissioned officers in sufficient numbers to meet Active Army, Reserve, and 
National Guard requirements. 

282 



Program of Instruction. The Army ROTC program consists of a voluntary six- 
semester-hour Basic Course (freshmen and sophomore level) and a two-year Advanced 
Course (junior and senior level) which includes a six week camp in the summer prior to the 
senior year. 

One may enter the Advanced Course without participating in the Basic Course by any of 
the following methods: 

NEW ENTRY OPTION: The Army ROTC New Entry Option is designed for junior and 
community college graduates, students at four-year institutions who did not take ROTC 
their first two years of college, and students entering a two-year post graduate course of 
study. THe New Entry Option offers an opportunity to enhance one's education and gradu- 
ate with more than a college diploma. Participants receive valuable leadership and man- 
agement training both in and outside the classroom along with $100 per month. Partici- 
pants develop new skills and gain the practical experience they need as an officer in the U.S. 
Army, and in their chosen civilian career. When participants finish the program and 
complete college, participants receive their first promotion— from student to second 
lieutenant. 

SIMULTANEOUS MEMBERSHIP PROGRAM (SMP): Persons or National Guard 
may take advantage of this program and, if accepted, enroll directly into the Advanced 
Course. SMP participants will be assigned to a unit near the school or home for part-time 
monthly officer training and will receive the ROTC Advanced Course subsistence payment 
of $100 per month, plus approximately $120 per month for the one weekend of Reserve or 
Guard training. In addition, two weeks of Annual Training will be required for which the 
individual will receive full pay. 

PRIOR SERVICE: Service veterans are eligible for placement into the Advanced 
Course. 

BASIC SUMMER CAMP: Successful completion of the six week basic summer camp, 
held at Ft. Knox, Kentucky, is an alternative to the basic course. 

TRANSFER CREDIT: Students entering as transfer students from other institutions 
may receive credit for work completed at other Senior ROTC units. 

JUNIOR ROTC: Students who have participated in a Junior ROTC in high school may 
receive placement credit as determined by the Professor of Military Science. 

Eligibility: All full time freshmen and sophomores may enroll in any Military Science 
Basic Course offering without obligation to the Army. To be eligible for participation in the 
Advanced Course, applicants must be in good academic standing, physically qualified and 
demonstrate satisfactory performance in the Basic Course. Additionally, applicants must 
be able to be commissioned by their 30th birthday: however, an age waiver may be obtained 
as long as the individual will be commissioned prior to his or her 34th birthday. A student 
must have a minimum of two years remaining as a full time student at either the under- 
graduate or graduate level. 

Professional Military Electives: There are seven Professional Military Electives which 
must be taken or an approval obtained of a waiver for them. These electives must be 
completed or waived prior to commissioning. 

Delays for Graduate Study: Qualified ROTC graduates may delay their entry into 
active service in order to obtain advanced academic degrees. Fellowships for advanced 
academic study are available to selected ROTC graduates, allowing up to two years of 
graduate study while receiving full pay and allowances plus payment for tuition, all fees, 
textbooks and required supplies. 

Financial Aid: Army scholarships of two to four years, which pay for tuition, all fees and 
textbooks, are available on a competitive basis to students who are strongly motivated and 
academically qualified. Students in the Advanced Course receive a subsistence allowance 
of $100 per month (tax free) up to a maximum of $2000. All Advanced Course cadets are 
paid approximately one-half the basic pay of a second lieutenant, while attending the 
six-week Advanced Camp, plus travel allowances to and from camp. 

Service Opportunities: Scholarship recipients may serve four years active duty upon 
commissioning or eight years in the U.S. Army Reserve or National Guard. Non- 
scholarship commissioners must serve three years on active duty or eight years with the 
Army Reserve or National Guard. Service consists of one weekend drill per month and two 
weeks annual training. 

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Program Features: Army ROTC classes are unique, offering instruction and a practi- 
cal, working knowledge of leadership. Students are challenged early in their ROTC train- 
ing to enable them to develop sound judgement, the desire to achieve, acceptance of 
responsibility, personal confidence, and to learn the principles of personnel management. 
The primary vehicle for this training during the academic year is Leadership Laboratory, 
where cadet officers and non-commissioned officers conduct instruction under the supervi- 
sion of the Military Science Department's faculty. The intensive summer Advanced Camp 
is extremely effective in developing one emotionally, mentally and physically. All Army 
ROTC training is focused on preparing the student to meet the challenges of tomorrow's 
societv, whether in a military or civilian careers. 

Distinguished Military Students: The university names outstanding Army ROTC stu- 
dents as Distinguished Military Graduates. 

Uniforms: Uniforms for Army ROTC are provided by the federal government. 

DEPARTMENT OF AEROSPACE STUDIES (AIR FORCE ROTC) 

Professor: ColonelJ. T. Ferrell 

Instructors: Major R. R. Baker. Captain F. P. Dunlap, Captain G. R. Dennison. Captain R. W. Iseman. 

Program. There is a four-year and a two-year program that leads to a commission in the 
United States Air Force. 

The four-year program allows freshman to enroll in Aerospace Studies courses in the 
same manner as other college courses for the first two years. Students take these courses as 
free electives and incur no military obligation unless they are receiving an AFROTC 
scholarship. These first two years are called the General Military Course (GMC). The last 
two years of AFROTC comprise the Professional Officer Course (POC). Non-AFROTC 
sophomore students may compete with GMC cadets for a position in the POC and obtain a 
commission under the two-year program. 

The two-year program is available to those who do not take the first two years of Air Force 
ROTC. Interested students must contact the Professor of Aerospace Studies early in the 
first semester of their sophomore year. Accepted students will attend a six-week summer 
field training encampment (two-year program) or a four-week encampment (four-year 
program) before entering their junior year and the POC. 

Students with a pilot allocation usually attend a flight instruction program during the 
summer following their junior year. This training is very similar to that available for 
obtaining a private pilot's license. Junior cadets may also apply for other special summer 
voluntary programs such as USAF Academy Freefall Parachute Training, British (RAF) 
Exchange Program, Army Airborne Training Program, Strategic Defense Initiative 
R&D Program, and other specialized professional development programs related to the 
cadet's future career area. 

Upon graduation and satisfactory completion of the POC, the student is commissioned a 
second lieutenant in the USAF. 

Financial Aide. Air Force ROTC students are encouraged to apply for scholarships 
ranging from two to three and one half years. Scholarships pay for tuition, fees, books, and 
provide students $100 per month during the academic year for miscellaneous expenses. 
Scholarships are awarded by the Air Force based primarily on college academic 
achievement. 

Students in the GMC, other than scholarship students, receive no monetary allowance. 
All POC student receive the $100 per month during the academic year. 

Curricu!uni. The AFROTC educational program provides professional preparation for 
future Air Force officers. During the first two years, courses will focus on a detailed study 
of the Air Force mission and organization, other military services, the evolution of Air- 
power concepts and doctrine, and the history of Airpower employment. During the last two 
years, the focus will be on leadership and management and an in-depth examination of 
National Security, American defense strategy and policy, and the methods for managing 
conflict. Throughout all four years a progressive development of communicative skills is 
integrated into each course. Officership is developed through leadership laboratory, tradi- 
tional military social functions, base orientation trips, and cadet-centered programs. 

284 



Eligibility. There are no enrollment requirement for the GMC. To enter the POC stu- 
dents must pass an Air Force Officer Qualifications Test, meet physical and academic 
requirements, and be selected by the Professor of Aerospace Studies and Air Force ROTC 
headquarters. In addition, student must complete their degree and the POC before their 
30th birthday. Veterans may obtain a waiver of maximum nonflying age requirement up to 
age 35. 

Students desiring to enter the four-year program simply register for the freshmen 
Aerospace Studies course. Other students should contact the ROTC office on campus in 
Room 141 of Reynolds Coliseum; or write to: Professor of Aerospace Studies, NCSU Box 
7308, Raleigh, N. C. 27695-7308. 

Organization. The AFROTC unit is organized as a cadet wing staffed entirely by cadets 
for leadership development. They are assisted and advised by the instructors. Three collat- 
eral organizations, Arnold Air Society, Marching Cadet Fraternity, and Angel Flight 
support the wing organization as well as the university. 

Uniforms. Uniforms are provided by the federal government. 

NAVAL SCIENCE (NAVAL ROTC) CROSS-ENROLLMENT 
WITH UNC-CH 

Professor: Colonel G. H. Walls, Jr. 

Associate Professor: Commander L. R. Corgnati, Jr.: Instructors: Major G. A. Clark. Jr.. Lieutenant P. R. Dobbs, 
Lieutenant B. T. Vance. Lieutenant T. J. Block. 

Mission. The purpose of the Naval ROTC Program is to provide a source of highly 
qualified and motivated naval officers, both men and women, to serve on surface ships, in 
aircraft, in submarines, or in the Marine Corps. Midshipmen who satisfy academic and 
physical requirements are commissioned as either an Ensign in the Navy or Second 
Lieutenant in the Marine Corps. Midshipmen are cross-enrolled in the Naval Science 
Department at UNC Chapel Hill but take all ROTC courses on campus at N.C. State. 

4-Year NROTC Program. There are basically two NROTC Programs leading to a 
commission as a Navy or Marine Officer upon graduation, the Scholarship Program and 
the College Program. 

Scholarship Program. The Scholarship Program leads to a regular commission in the 
Navy or Marine Corps. For students who receive a Navy/Marine Corps scholarship, the 
Navy will pay tuition and fees, buy books, supply uniforms, and pay $100 per month 
tax-free subsistence allowance to help defray the cost of normal board at the university. 
During the summers between school years scholarship students will receive 4-6 weeks of 
at-sea training conducted on ships, submarines, and aircraft of the Navy's first line force. 
Upon graduation and commissioning, the scholarship students are obligated to serve a 
minimum of four years on active duty. 

College Program. For those students who are interested in a reserve commission and do 
not desire a scholarship, or for those who are seeking an opportunity to qualify for a 
scholarship after entering NCSU, the College Program is available. Selection for the 
College Program is made from students already enrolled at NCSU, with applications being 
accepted and considered by the staff of the NROTC unit. Students enrolled in the College 
Program are provided uniforms. Naval Science textbooks, and during the final two years of 
the program, receive a $100 per month subsistence allowance. College Program midship- 
men receive a single summer training cruise between their junior and senior year. Except 
for the administrative differences, no distinction is made between the Scholarship and 
College Program midshipmen. The minimum active duty commitment following gradua- 
tion for a College Program student is three years. 

Students in the College Program are eligible to compete for scholarships at regular 
intervals throughout the college year. Most College Program students who have demon- 
strated above average academic and professional performance in the unit have received 
scholarships. 

Two- Year Programs. The Two- Year Programs offer an opportunity to participate in 
NROTC during the final two years of university study. Both Scholarship and College 
Programs exist, offering the same advantages to the student as the respective four-year 

285 



programs. Upon selection, the candidate attends a six-week training course at Newport, 
Rhode Island, during the summer between the sophomore and junior years so that he or she 
may receive instruction in the Naval Science subjects normally covered in the first two 
years at the unit. Participants in this training course receive uniforms, rooms, board and 
officer candidate pay during the period and, upon satisfactory completion of training, enter 
the NROTC program as third year students. Applications for this program must be 
completed by March 15 prior to the starting year. 

The Marine Option. A limited number of quotas are available for students who wish to 
enter either of the NROTC Programs as Marine Officer candidates. For others who may 
decide upon a Marine Corps commission after joining NROTC, selection for the Marine 
Option may be made in the sophomore year. A midshipman's status as a Marine Option will 
result in some modifications as to curriculum and the final summer training period. 

Curriculum. Due to the increasingly advanced technologies being employed by the 
Navy, candidates for regular Navy Commissions are being encouraged to select academic 
majors in mathematics, engineering, and scientific disciplines. However, each student in 
the NROTC program is free to choose his area of major study. 

The NROTC training program emphasizes military indoctrination, physical fitness, and 
academics. All required NROTC courses are fully accredited and taken for free elective 
credit. Additional university courses may be required depending upon one's major; how- 
ever, all Navy option scholarship midshipmen must complete one year of calculus and 
physics. In addition to the courses taken for university credit, midshipmen will attend one 
laboratory/drill period each week. 

Midshipmen Life. Academic excellence is emphasized throughout the NROTC Pro- 
gram with commensurate participation in the full range of campus, extra curricular 
activities. Additionally, midshipmen have opportunities to examine all aspects of life in the 
Navy and Marine Corps through field trips, summer cruises, sail training, social activities, 
and participation in the midshipmen military organizations. 

Further information regarding application for and admission into the N.C. State Naval 
ROTC may be obtained on campus in Room 205 Peele Hall or by writing to the Professor of 
Naval Science, Box 7310, NCSU, Raleigh, N.C, 27695. 



Graduate School 

Peele Hall 

D. W. Stewart, Dean 

E. M. Crawford, Associate Dean 
D. A. Emery, Associate Dean 

T. Melton, Associate Dean 

The Graduate School provides instruction and facilities for advanced study and research 
in the fields of agriculture and life sciences, design, education and psychology, engineering, 
forest resources, humanities and social sciences, physical and mathematical sciences, 
textiles and veterinary medicine. 

The school is currently composed of more than 1,700 graduate faculty members within 
the nine colleges. Educated at major universities throughout the world and established 
both in advanced teaching and research, these scholars guide the university's graduate 
student body of some 3,800 men and women from all areas of the United States and about 90 
other countries. 

The faculty and students have available exceptional facilities including libraries, labora- 
tories, modern equipment and special research areas. 

For a list of graduate degrees offered at North Carolina State University and details on 
programs and admissions, consult the Graduate Catalog. 

286 



Adult Credit Programs and 
Summer Sessions 

J. F. Cudd, Director 

The Office of Adult Credit Programs registers and provides student services to 
Undergraduate Studies (UGS) and Post-Baccalaureate Studies (PBS) students who enroll 
in the university's regularly scheduled day and evening classes. These non-degree students 
may take any course offered by the university, provided they satisfy any required prerequi- 
sites and space is available. Late afternoon and evening courses are offered primarily for 
the benefit of adults who are unable, because of time limitations, to attend day courses. 
Each semester, over 300 afternoon and evening courses are offered in over 45 subject areas. 
Twelve undergraduate and ten graduate degrees may be completed by individuals enrolled 
solely in evening classes. Approximately 4,000 UGS and PBS students enroll each 
semester. 

Using a variety of delivery systems, classes are offered across the state and throughout 
the U.S. Methods include traditional, face-to-face instruction, as well as courses offered by 
various telecommunication mechanisms. Total enrollment in off campus credit courses for 
1989-1990 was 2,746. 

More than 40 courses in 19 subject areas are offered through the Independent Study 
(correspondence) Program. Administration of the program is handled by the Office of 
Independent Study of the Division of Extension and (Continuing Education at UNC-Chapel 
Hill. Television based home study courses are occasionally offered in conjunction with the 
UNC-TV Network. 

The Summer Sessions at North Carolina State University offer an extensive educational 
program planned to meet the varied needs and interests of approximately 14,000 students. 
Sixty departments offer instruction in more than 700 courses, approximately 90% of which 
are at the undergraduate level. Each of the university's nine colleges and schools, with a 
combined faculty of more than 500, participates in the summer sessions. The schedule 
includes two "regular" five week sessions, a ten-week session, and a three-week institute for 
adult and extension educators, as well as several dozen evening courses scheduled for the 
convenience of working adults. 

Summer courses and special programs are designed for the new student, the undergrad- 
uate wanting to advance his or her academic standing at State, the graduate desiring to 
continue study and research during the summer months, and visiting students pursuing 
degrees at other institutions. Teachers who need to earn credit toward renewal of teaching 
certificates or advanced degrees in education and persons in professional fields who wish to 
keep abreast of new developments and trends also take advantage of State's summer 
programs. 

For information regarding summer activities write: Director of Summer Sessions, Box 
7401. Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-7401. 

University Extension and 
Public Service 

Jane S. McKimmon Center 

A. L. White, Interim Vice Chancellor for Extension and Public Service 

S. L. Kirsch, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor 

Campus-wide coordination and communications for extension, public service and con- 
tinuing education activities are provided through the office of the Vice Chancellor for 
Extension and Public Service. In carrying out these responsibilities, the division provides 



287 



assistance in the identification of educational needs for individuals and groups throughout 
the state, program development and implementation, program evaluation, and statewide 
coordination with the constituent members of the University of North Carolina. The vice 
chancellor is assisted in his campus-wide responsibilities by the University and Public 
Service Advisory Council and the Extension, Lifelong Education and Instructional Televi- 
sion Committee of the University, which are composed of faculty and staff representatives 
from each of the colleges and schools. 

The vice chancellor acts as an advocate for extension and provides support for inter- 
school programs, centers and other multidiscipline resources of the university to meet the 
lifelong education, public service, and technical assistance needs of the citizens of North 
Carolina. 

OFFICE OF CONTINUING EDUCATION AND 
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 

Edgar B. Marston, Director 

Continuing Education Specialists: D. Shell, C. McElroy. L. Ray. A. S. Warren, B. Winston, M. Hall. A. Coughlin. 

In keeping with the land grant tradition of the university, the Office of Continuing 
Education and Professional Development provides education and training to all the people. 
Programs covered include: agriculture, communication, data processing, economics, edu- 
cation, engineering, forestry, management, the physical sciences, recreation, textiles, and 
veterinary medicine. Special efforts are made to meet the training needs of industry and 
government agencies. More than 900 courses are offered with registrations totalling over 
27,000. 

The university awards Continuing Education Units to participants in qualified pro- 
grams. Continuing Education Units are part of a nationwide recording system to provide a 
uniform measure of attainment in noncredit educational programs. One CEU is defined as 
"ten contact hours of participation in an organized continuing education experience under 
responsible sponsorship, capable direction and qualified instruction." 

Also available during evening hours is the General Interest Course program, which is 
made up of avocational, cultural and professional development noncredit courses. Over 150 
courses are offered, reaching thousands of individuals. 

CENTER FOR URBAN AFFAIRS AND COMMUNITY SERVICES 

P. Meyer, Director 

Group Managers: Y. S. Brannon 

The Center for Urban Affairs and Community Services brings the research, educational, 
and extension resources of NCSU to bear upon community problems associated with 
urbanization in North Carolina. In addition to providing direct services, such as applied 
research, education, and technical assistance, to local and state governments in the areas of 
social sciences, human services, policy analysis, and evaluation research, the center also: (1) 
provides experiential educational opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students 
and (2) develops and supports research opportunities for faculty and upper-level graduate 
students. 

The Center for Urban Affairs and Community Services coordinates its work with other 
members ot the University of North Carolina's Urban Studies programs through the 
Urban Studies Council. The council enables universities and other institutions across the 
state to pool their efforts to encourage productivity and responsiveness of government and 
community institutions. 



288 



EMERGING ISSUES FORUM 

B. Owen, Director 

The Emerging Issues Forum provides an important arena for bringing together top-level 
leaders from government, business, education, and the scientific community to discuss and 
debate the most critical issues of our time, to question conventional wisdom, and to test new 
ideas. The forum supports NCSU's unique role in relation to major American industries by 
serving as a catalyst for framing questions and suggesting answers in the world arena of 
economic and technological developments. The forum generates the kind of public policy 
debate that relates to jobs, opportunities, education, and quality of life and, at the same 
time, the forum endorses as top national priorities the concepts of innovation and 
competitiveness. 

INSTRUCTIONAL TELECOMMUNICATIONS 

T. L. Russell, Director 

Academic credit courses are not offered for distant learners by way of instructional 
television. Selected courses from the colleges of Engineering, Humanities and Social 
Sciences, Physical Science and Mathematics, and Textiles are held in studio/classrooms for 
live transmission or videotaped delivery to off campus students. Currently, courses are 
delivered by cable television public access and ITFS in the Raleigh/Wake County/Research 
Triangle Park areas, by microwave interconnecting major university campuses in the 
state, by satellite to students of the National Technological University, and by videocassette 
throughout North Carolina and beyond. 

INTERNATIONAL TRADE CENTER 

T. R. Brown, Director 

The International Trade Center offers programs to upgrade and improve the skills of 
executives, managers and professionals whose work involves international trade. Practical, 
in-depth seminars, workshops, short courses, and trade conferences provide instruction in 
areas of identified need, such as marketing, export, finance, documentation, and a variety 
of other aspects of world trade. The center offers briefings and updates on key markets 
abroad. The International Trade Center arranges specially designed in-house programs for 
individual companies and business groups. The Special International Luncheon Series 
brings international leaders to the area, providing timely and authoritative information on 
important international business and trade topics. Acting as a resource, the I.T.C. identifies 
and recruits speakers and instructors to address topical issues on international business, i.e. 
finance, law, governments, culture, countertrade, joint ventures, infrastructure, logistics, 
etc. With their experience and background, these experts provide the guidance and down- 
to-earth advice to meet current needs. International Trade Center programs attract a 
diverse group of people, including those from business and industry; professional firms; 
banks; service organizations; federal, state, and local government; and educational institu- 
tions. As a result of the expanded participation of North Carolina businesses in interna- 
tional markets, the International Trade Center is currently participating in the develop- 
ment of a World Trade Center for the Raleigh area which will underpin the international 
programs of area universities with business and industry acumen. 

JANE S. McKIMMON CENTER FOR 
EXTENSION AND CONTINUING EDUCATION 

D. S. Jackson, Director 

The Jane S. McKimmon Center serves as the premier adult education facility in North 
Carolina. It provides program support services in pleasant surroundings conducive to the 
interchange of ideas and information. In the fourteen years since opening in June, 1976, the 



289 



center's sixteen conference rooms have been used for 15,350 educational meetings- 
bringing a total of 972.000 adults from all walks of life to our campus for participation in an 
education activity. 



University Libraries 



S. K. Nutter. Director 

D. S. Keener. Assistant Director for Administrative Services 

S. S. Striedieck. Assistant Director for Technical Services and Collection Management 

C. L. Gilreath. Assistant Director for Public Servwes 

J. Y. Davis. Assistant Director for Planning and Development 

J. E. Ulmschneider, Assistant Director for Library Systems 

The NCSU Libraries consist of the D. H. Hill Library and its branch libraries. They 
contain more than 1.2 million volumes of books and bound journals. 800.000 federal 
government publications, and more than 3 million microforms. The collections are particu- 
larly strong in the biological and physical sciences, engineering, agriculture, forestry, 
textiles and architecture, with the arts, humanities and social sciences also well repre- 
sented. The Libraries regularly receive more than 19.000 serials. Five special libraries— 
the Burlington Textiles Library in Nelson Hall, the Harrye B. Lyons Design Library in 
Brooks Hall, the Natural Resources Library in Jordan Hall, the Veterinary Medical 
Library in Veterinary Medical Building and the Curriculum Materials Center in Poe 
Hall— serve the special needs of their respective school and colleges. 

The NCSU Libraries have been a depository for U.S. government publications since 1924 
and receives over 88 percent of these publications. The Libraries also receive the microfiche 
research reports published by the Department of Energy, the National Aeronautical and 
Space Administration (NASA), the Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC), 
and the National Technical Information Services (NTIS). 

The BIS online, computer-based author, title and subject catalog permits rapid identifi- 
cation of monographs and serials in the collections of the NCSU Libraries as well as those of 
Duke University and UNC-Chapel Hill. This resource sharing greatly enhances the 
research capabilities of the NCSU Libraries. This is made possible through the Libraries' 
participation in the Triangle Research Libraries Network (TRLN). An automated circula- 
tion system introduced in 1990 provides quick, easy check-out of books by borrowers. 

A number of bibliographic and full-text databases are available in CD-ROM format for 
searching by users at no charge. These databases cover fields such as engineering, agricul- 
ture, education, business, and patent literature. In addition, the Libraries provide staff- 
assisted searching of hundreds of other online databases on a cost-recovery basis. 

Facilities and equipment are also available for both individual and group use of audio- 
visual media. The library's theatre can be scheduled for group media presentations, and 
films in the State Library's film collection can be borrowed by the D.H. Hill Library's 
Media Renter for academic use by faculty and students. The Media Center is equipped with 
audio and video equipment for group and individual viewing and listening. The library has 
a growing collection of video and audio cassettes for individual and class use. 

CURRICULUM MATERIALS CENTER 

M. A. Link, Coordinator 

C. A. Cranford, Assistant Coordinator 

The Curriculum Materials Center, administered by the College of Education and Psy- 
chology, is located in 400 Poe Hall. The center maintains a collection of education materials 

290 



with particular emphasis on teaching methods, research, administration and psychology 
and includes films, filmstrips, slides, audiotapes, video cassettes, simulation games, and 
computer software. Audiovisual equipment is available for previewing materials in the 
center. The center acquires textbooks adopted by the State Board of Education for secon- 
dary level subjects as well as other selected textbooks and reference materials. The mission 
of the center is to support programs in the College of Education and Psychology. Lending 
policies permit the use of certain materials by the larger campus community for instruc- 
tional and research purposes. 



University Computing 

H. E. Schaffer. Associate Provost for Academic Computing Services 
H. L. Buckmaster, Director, Administrative Computing Services 
C. W. Malstrom, Director, Computing Center 

The Computing Facilities at NCSU include a major mainframe installation and a large 
collection of computing resources, both in the central facilities of the Computing Center, 
and distributed on campus, serving the academic and administrative functions of NCSU. 
These components are interconnected by a comprehensive data communications network 
which also connects to the Concert, Bitnet, SURAnet/Internet and Usenet networks. NCSU 
is also a participant in the North Carolina Supercomputing Center, in the Research 
Triangle Park, which is on the Concert network and which has a CRAY Y-MP supercompu- 
ter, a Convex C-2 mini-supercomputer, an IBM 3090/170J, and visualization facilities. 

The major computers in the Computing Center are an IBM 3090/180J shared between 
academic computing and administrative data processing, and IBM 4381 and DEC 
VAX8700 computers for academic use. The Computing Center also provides a large selec- 
tion of central services including terminal facilities, consulting, user support from super- 
computers to microcomputers, data communications, and repair facilities for microcompu- 
ters and terminals. The Computing Center is a Smart Node of the Cornell National 
Supercomputer Facility. The IBM, VAX and other equipment is used to provide a variety 
of network services including protocol conversion for such protocols as SNA, DECnet, 
TCP/IP, Token Ring and RSCS. The Computing Center has responsibility for several data 
communications networks including a large broadband cable system, a large data switch, 
an optical fiber backbone and various other low, medium and high speed communication 
media. 

All of these facilities, and other networked resources including the library on-line catalog 
and a campus information resource, can be reached via dial up lines and over the data 
communications networks provided on the campus. Access can be via data terminals and by 
personally owned microcomputers which are also used by themselves for word processing, 
scientific computation, etc.. The NCSU Bookstores provide an opportunity for students to 
purchase microcomputers and software at low academic prices. 

Additionally, many departments provide student access to networked minicomputers, 
microcomputers, workstations, and dedicated minicomputers. Particularly notable is Pro- 
ject Eos in the College of Engineering, which is intergrating NCSU provided engineering 
computing workstations into undergraduate education. 



Research Triangle 



The unique "Research Triangle" in North Carolina has captured national and interna- 
tional attention. It is comprised of the Research Triangle Park, a world reknowned 
research park, and three major research universities. Because of this wealth of educational 



291 



and research opportunities, the Triangle area contains the highest total of Ph.D. scientists 
and engineers per capita, in the nation. The Triangle Universities— NCSU, the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and Duke University— have a subsidiary campus in the 
Research Triangle Park— the Research Triangle Institute. The Institute, which operates as 
a contract research organization, has an annual research revenue of approximately $100 
million. 

The Research Triangle Park, founded in 1959, now has more than 55 public and private 
industrial research facilities, situated on 6,800 acres of land. Over 33,000 people work in the 
Park and over 52,000 additional jobs have been created outside the Park as a result of its 
existence. Organizations in the Park include such government facilities as the National 
Humanities Center, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Envi- 
ronmental Protection Agency, and the National Center for Health Statistics. Private 
companies such as Glaxo Pharmaceuticals, Northern Telecom and Reichhold Chemicals 
have their North American headquarters in the Park. Two major, state-supported research 
initiatives in Microelectronics and Biotechnology are located in the Park and North Caro- 
lina's new $18 million Supercomputing Center is housed there as well. Faculty and gradu- 
ate students from the universities work closely with many of the Park companies. Scientists 
and researchers from companies like Burroughs Wellcome, IBM, and Becton-Dickinson 
frequently hold adjunct appointments in one or another of the Triangle Universities. 



Research Centers 
and Facilities 

BIOLOGY FIELD LABORATORY 

P. D. Doerr, Director 

The Biology Field Laboratory is located six miles from the university campus and 
comprises two small streams, a 20 acre pond, 50 acres of varied terrestrial habitats and 
several laboratory buildings. The facilities, used for laboratory and field instruction and for 
undergraduate, graduate and faculty research, is particularly suited for use by advanced 
classes in several biological science departments. Qualities that make the Field Laboratory 
an attractive teaching and research site include habitat diversity, restricted public access 
and proximity to the campus. 

CENTER FOR ADVANCED ELECTRONIC MATERIALS PROCESS- 
ING (AEMP) 

N. A. Masnari, Director 

The Advanced Electronic Materials Processing Center was established in 1988 as one of 
the prestigious NSF Engineering Research Centers. The center's program is interdiscipli- 
nary and involves collaboration among chemists, physicists, materials scientists, and elec- 
trical, computer and mechanical engineers. The research focuses on the development of 
electronic materials processing technologies that will provide the capability of producing 
submicron electronic devices. The program emphasizes low-temperature processes using 
plasma and thermal and optically assisted techniques as well as the automation and control 
of those processes. It is a joint effort with researchers from the University of North Carolina 
(Chapel Hill and Charlotte), Duke University, North Carolina A&T State University, 
Research Triangle Institute, and the Microelectronics Center of North Carolina. 



292 



CENTER FOR ASEPTIC PROCESSING AND PACKAGING STUDIES 

Kenneth R. Swartzel, Director 

The Center for Aseptic Processing and Packaging Studies was established in October 
1987 to promote cooperative research between university and industrial researchers and to 
further scientific knowledge in areas of food and pharmaceutical aseptic processing and 
packaging. The center is funded by the National Science Foundation, North Carolina State 
University, and industrial members from food, pharmaceutical, and packaging industries. 
Current members include Fluor Daniel, the Food and Drug Administration, International 
Paper Company, John Labatt Foods, Kraft General Foods, the North Carolina Biotechnol- 
ogy Center, Nestle, Ross Laboratories, and USDA-Agricultural Research Service. The 
objectives of the center are to support industrially relevant, fundamental research in 
aseptic processing and packaging, to enhance product quality and improve efficiency, and 
to communicate information gained from basic research to industry for development and 
marketing. 

Graduate students working on CAPPS projects will be exposed to industrial concerns 
and given the opportunity to work first-hand with industry in solving problems and making 
practical application of their research. The research involves faculty, visiting scientists, 
graduate students and technicians from the Departments of Food Science and Biological 
and Agricultural Engineering. Other universities participating in the research include 
Michigan State University, North Carolina A&T and State University, The Ohio State 
University, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. 

CENTER FOR COMMUNICATIONS AND SIGNAL PROCESSING 

Arne A. Nilsson, Acting Director 

In 1981, the National Science Foundation selected North Carolina State University as a 
site for an industry/university cooperative research Center for Communications and Signal 
Processing (CCSP). As of June 1989, CCSP members are: AT&T, BellSouth, Digital 
Equipment Corp., General Electric Co., International Business Machines, Kodak, and 
Northern Telecom/BNR. CCSP has achieved national and international recognition as a 
center of excellence in communications and signal processing research. The objectives of 
the center are to conduct basic and applied research that can lead to products and services 
in the communications and signal processing fields and to strengthen industry/university 
relationships. In addition to providing useful research services to industrial participants, 
the center enhances the education of graduate students by providing them with practical, 
relevant research topics and the means for carrying out their research. 

CENTER FOR OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION 

G. E. Moore, Acting Director 

Established as a vocational education research and development center in 1965 under the 
provisions of the Vocational Education Act of 1963, the Center for Occupational Education, 
an integral unit within the College of Education and Psychology, was founded on the 
principle that the problems facing occupational education are so varied that no single field 
of research or single disciplinary orientation has the capability of providing all the answers. 
Studies and conferences in occupational education planning, work analysis, evaluation, 
labor and economics, policy analysis, personnel and leadership development, and education 
have been included in the center's program. The center's programs are financed largely by 
grants and contracts from federal and state agencies. 



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CENTER FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN MATHEMATICS 
AND SCIENCE EDUCATION 

S. B. Berenson, Director 

The center, one of ten centers in the North Carolina Mathematics and Science Education 
Network, is the only research and development center in the network. Established within 
the Department of Mathematics and Science Education in 1984, the center conducts 
research and development activities for precollege students, preservice teachers, inservice 
teachers, and university faculty. The center identifies areas of need in mathematics and 
science education and forms partnerships with federal, state, local and private funding 
agencies to work collaboratively to address the needs. Grants have been obtained from the 
National Science Foundation. Office of Education, State Department of Public Instruction, 
Local Education Agencies, the Ford Foundation, and IBM to introduce changes that 
incorporate technology and active learning into the mathematics and science curriculum, 
K-16. In addition, the center supports graduate students and provides them with opportuni- 
ties to write grants and to design, conduct, and report on educational research. 

CENTER FOR SOUND AND VIBRATION 

R. F. Keltie, Director 

The Center for Sound and Vibration, established in 1969 and administered within the 
Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, comprises faculty pursuing the 
solution to a wide variety of vibration and sound problems occurring in machinery and 
aircraft design. Graduate programs exist at M.S. and Ph.D. levels in such fields as noise and 
vibration control, structural acoustics, aeroacoustics, hearing conservation, computer- 
aided machinery design, architectural and musical acoustics, and acoustic signal process- 
ing. Outstanding experimental facilities, which include large anechoic and reverberant 
rooms and computer graphics equipment, are available. The center's programs are 
financed largely by grants and contracts from industry and federal and state agencies. 

ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH CENTER 

J. J. Grainger, Co-Director, Electrical Area 
P. J. Turinsky, Co-Director, Nuclear Area 

The Electric Power Research Center, established in 1985 within the NCSU College of 
Engineering, is supported via membership fees, enhancement grants and normal research 
contracts by organizations from the various sectors of the electric utility and power indus- 
try, including national laboratories and private interests. The purpose of the center is to 
collaborate in enhancing the excellence of a wide range of research and graduate-level 
degree programs in electric power system from power generation to end usage. This 
primary purpose is accomplished by supporting interested faculty and students' involve- 
ment in basic and applied research directly relevant to the needs of the multifaceted 
electric power industry. Motivation to work with the center derives from the close univer- 
sity/membership interaction, the leverage afforded members via pooled resources, and the 
enhanced professional and research opportunities provided to faculty and students in 
electric power engineering. 

The current research program involves faculty from the Department of Electrical and 
Computer Engineering. However, the center facilitates access by all sectors of the electric 
power industry to the various resources of the university. 

ELECTRON MICROSCOPE FACILITIES 

There are four electron microscope facilities at N.C. State available to graduate students 
and faculty for research purposes. "The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences Center for 
Electron Microscopy is located in Gardner Hall, the Engineering Research Microscope 
Facility is in Burlington Engineering Labs and the Department of Wood and Paper Science 
Electron Microscopy Lab is in Biltmore Hall. The new SVM Electron Microscopy Labora- 

294 



tory is located in the North Carolina State University School of Veterinary Medicine at 
4700 Hillsborough Street in Raleigh. 

J. M. MacKenzie, Jr., Coordinator, CALS Center for Electron Microscopy 

The CALS Center for Electron Microscopy has a Philips 400T transmission electron 
microscope with STEM capabilities and computer control. In addition, three other trans- 
mission microscopes — a JEOL 100-S, a Hitachi HUll-B, and a Hitachi HS-8 — are used for 
teaching and research. There are two scanning electron microscopes in the facility— a 
Philips 505T with computer control and JEOL T200. The center is fully equipped for a 
range of biological specimen preparations and also has two darkrooms. 

Formal instruction is provided through the biological sciences curriculum and includes 
specimen preparations, use of the microscopes, and production of electron micrographs. 
Over the next several years, the center will be experimenting with short, intensive five- and 
six-week courses in transmission/ultramicrotomy and scanning respectively. In addition to 
its training function, the center instituted a complete service program in 1989. 

E. M. Gregory, Supennsor, Engineering, Analytical Instrumentation Facility 

The Engineering Research Analytical Instrumentation Facility is equipped with a 
scanning auger microprobe, an ion microscope, a 200kv analytical scanning transmission 
electron microscope (STEM), and a computer-controlled scanning electron microscope 
(SEM), the latter two equipped with energy dispersive X-ray analysis systems. These are 
suitable for examination of metallurgical, ceramic and electronic materials, textiles and 
organic specimens. The high voltage STEM enables the researcher to examine thicker 
specimens. The X-ray analytical capability is used in conjunction with high resolution 
imaging for qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis of small amounts of materials 
(down to cubic microns in bulk materials and a few hundred nanometers in thin samples). 
The scanning auger microprobe is capable of surface analysis of the top 3 atomic layers of a 
solid material in an area of 50 to 100 nanometers. The auger microprobe is equipped with an 
argon ion gun so that depth profiling may be done through thin films. The ion microprobe 
can perform elemental and isotope analysis to monolayer depths, with a lateral resolution of 
one micrometer. It can also do depth profiling, especially important for implanted semi- 
conductors. The facility is completely equipped for specimen preparation and technical 
photography in the physical sciences, is representative of the best modern microanalysis 
instrumentation, and is unique in this geographical area. 

E. A. Wheeler, Coordinator, WPS Microscopy LaJ) 

The Department of Wood and Paper Science Microscopy Lab is equipped with a 
Siemens Elmskop-IA transmission electron microscope as well as equipment necessary for 
the preparation and study of specimens with light microscopy. 

M. J. Dykstra, Director, SVM Electron Microscopy Laboratory 

The CVM Electron Microscopy Laboratory is a facility housing a Philips 410 LS 
transmission electron microscope for biological specimens and a JOEL JSM-35 scanning 
electron microscope. All the back-up equipment for preparing specimens to be viewed with 
either instrument are housed within the laboratory as well as complete darkroom facilities 
for the preparation of routine and publication materials. 

HIGHLANDS BIOLOGICAL STATION 

R. C. Bruce, Director 

As an institutional member of the Highlands Biological Foundation, Inc., North Carolina 
State University helps support the Highlands Biological Station, an inland field station 
located 3,823 feet above sea level in the heart of North Carolina's southern Appalachians. 
The area has an extremely diverse biota and the highest rainfall in the eastern United 
States. 

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Facilities are available throughout the year for pre- and post-doctoral research in ecol- 
ogy, botany, zoology, soils and geology. Field-oriented research is supported by a laboratory 
building with research rooms and cubicles, a well equipped library, and five cottages and a 
dining hall located on the edge of a six-acre lake. The station owns 16 acres surrounding the 
lake as well as several tracts of undisturbed forested land. Research grants available 
through the station provide stipends for room, board, and research expenses. 

INSTITUTE OF STATISTICS 

D. L. Solomon, Director 

The Institute of Statistics is composed of two sections, one at Raleigh and the other at 
Chapel Hill. At North Carolina State University, the institute provides statistical consult- 
ing services to all branches of the institution, sponsors research in statistical theory and 
methodology, and coordinates the teaching of statistics at the undergraduate and graduate 
levels. The instructional and other academic functions are performed by the Department of 
Statistics, which forms a part of the institute. 

INTEGRATED MANUFACTURING SYSTEMS ENGINEERING 
INSTITUTE 

C. F. Zorowski, Director 

The Integrated Manufacturing Systems Engineering Institute was established at North 
Carolina State University in 1984 to provide a multifaceted educational, research, and 
technology transfer inititative in manufacturing systems engineering. The objectives of 
this program are to educate engineers in the theory and practice of advanced design and 
manufacturing methods at the master's degree level; to conduct basic and applied research 
on topics related to contemporary manufacturing problems; and to engage in technology 
transfer to increase productivity and improve the quality of manufactured products. 

The central goals of the institute are to integrate computer-aided processes into the 
design and control of manufacturing facilities enabling them to produce manufactured 
goods of improved quality at lowered cost. Through both internally and externally funded 
research projects the institute helps solve generic manufacturing systems engineering 
problems and provides a vehicle for technology transfer. 

MARS MISSION RESEARCH CENTER 

F. R. DeJarnette, Director 

The Mars Mission Research Center is one of nine University Space Engineering 
Research Centers established by NASA to broaden the nation's engineering capability to 
meet the critical needs of the civilian space program. The goal of the center is to focus on 
educational and research technologies used in the design of spacecraft for planetary explo- 
ration with particular emphasis on Mars. It is a cooperative program involving faculty, 
undergraduate, and graduate students at North Carolina State University and N. C A&T 
State University. The research is a cross-disciplined program involving (1) hypersonic 
aerodynamics and propulsion, (2) composite materials and fabrication, (3) light-weight 
structures, and (4) spacecraft controls. Students and faculty conduct part of their research 
at NASA Centers and participating industries. 

MATERIALS RESEARCH CENTER 

R. F. Davis, Director 

The Materials Research Center was established in 1984 at NCSU as an interdisciplinary 
program involving persons representing the Departments of Chemistry, Electrical and 
Computer Engineering, Materials Engineering and Physics. The principal thrust area of 



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the center involves fundamental studies in the epitaxy of compound semiconductors. The 
center serves as a focal point for this cooperative research. However, the experimental 
efforts are conducted within the four departments noted above. 

MICROELECTRONICS CENTER OF NORTH CAROLINA 

A. Reisman, Vice-President for Semiconductor Research and Technology 

North Carolina State University is a participating member of the Microelectronics 
Center of North Carolina (MCNC) which has been established to support the academic and 
research programs in microelectronics. Other participating institutions are the University 
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke University, North Carolina Agricultural and 
Technical State University, the Research Triangle Institute and the University of North 
Carolina at Charlotte. 

MCNC consists of a Semiconductor Research and Integrated Circuit Design and Fabri- 
cation Facility located at the Research Triangle Park near Raleigh and a teaching and 
research Integrated Circuit Fabrication Facility located on the NCSU campus. These 
facilities are dedicated to the support of VLSI (Very Large-Scale Integration) microelec- 
tronics teaching and research programs at the participating institutions. Faculty and 
students at NCSU have access to the use of MCNC facilities on sponsored research projects 
and for formal academic courses including microelectronics design and fabrication labora- 
tories. Areas of interest include system design, systems engineering, integrated circuit 
technology, semiconductor materials and device physics. Departments at NCSU which are 
actively involved in the program include Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer 
Science, Physics, Chemistry, and Materials Engineering. 

NORTH CAROLINA JAPAN CENTER 

J. Sylvester, Jr., Director 

The North Carolina Japan Center was established in 1980 at North Carolina State 
University to strengthen academic, scientific, economic, and cultural ties between Japan 
and North Carolina. The center also helps conduct the formal exchange NCSU has with 
Nagoya University, a major national scientific university in Japan. 

Under the North Carolina Japan Fellows program, 41 professors and staff have taken a 
year of Japanese language training and then worked in Japan for a half year with Japanese 
colleagues in their specialty. They use their Japanese experience in their teaching and 
research, and they participate in the activities of the center and of the state in its relations 
with Japan. 

The center offers introductory and advanced levels of Japanese language for students and 
gives special seminars for businessmen and others interested in Japan. Public lectures are 
given on Japan by members of the staff and the Fellows. Various films dealing with modern 
Japan, and North Carolina's ties with Japan have been prepared for teacher training, 
public television, and Japanese companies interested in investment in North Carolina. The 
center has raised an endowment in memory of former Provost Harry Kelly and his contri- 
bution to US-Japan scientific ties. The funds are used for scholarships for NCSU students to 
take special intensive programs in the Japanese language. The center also works with 
American companies selling to Japan and Japanese firms locating in North Carolina. 

NUCLEAR SERVICES DIVISION 

J. N. Weaver, Manager 

Specialized nuclear service facilities are available to the university faculty, students, 
state and federal agencies, and industry. The purpose of these facilities is to further the use 
of nuclear energy in engineering research and in scientific and public service programs. 
The facilities include: a 1 megawatt steady-state, pool-type, research reactor (PULSTAR) 
with a variety of test facilities; a neutron activation analysis and radioisotope laboratory 
equipped with two ND6700 Gamma Spectrometry Systems coupled to ten GeLi solid-state 



297 



detectors, two LEPD detectors and two 5" Nal detectors; a prompt gamma facility; a 
neutron depth profile facility; a neutron radiography facility, a low level counting labora- 
tory equipped with liquid scintillation systems, radon systems, alpha spectrometry systems 
and an oxidizer; intermediate hot laboratories with hoods, junior caves and glove boxes; 
transuranic nuclear materials laboratory and computing and photographic rooms. 

The 50,000 square-foot Burlington Engineering Laboratories complex houses the 
Department of Nuclear Engineering and the Department of Materials Science and Engi- 
neering with their associated offices and laboratories. All of the facilities including the 
reactoi'are on the North Carolina State University campus. 

PESTICIDE RESIDUE RESEARCH LABORATORY 

T. J. Sheets, Director 

The Pesticide Residue Research Laboratory is a facility in the College of Agriculture and 
Life Sciences devoted to research on pesticide residues in animals, plants, soils, water and 
other entities of man's environment. Although the laboratory is administered through the 
Department of Toxicology, it provides pesticide residue analyses for research projects in all 
departments of the college. 

Not only does the laboratory perform interdepartmental residue research, but faculty in 
the laboratory also conduct independent pesticide research on persistence and decomposi- 
tion in soils and plants, absorption and translocation in plants, distribution in environment, 
and contamination of streams, estuaries and ground water. 

PLANT DISEASE AND INSECT CLINIC 

R. K. Jones, Director 

The Plant Disease and Insect Clinic (PDIC) provides a unique diagnostic and educational 
service to plant growers in North Carolina. It is an integral part of the extension program in 
the Plant Pathology and Entomology Departments. The PDIC receives approximately 
7,000 problem samples each year. County Agents, Extension Specialists and growers 
submit samples from agricultural crops, forests, urban gardens, house plants, etc. This 
provides an opportunity to observe and work with practical problems currently developing 
and causing damage. 

There are constant and increasingly rapid changes taking place in agricultural technol- 
ogy. These changes require new types of assays and more sophisticated laboratory exami- 
nations. Plant problems must be correctly diagnosed and proper control strategies 
employed as quickly as possible for growers to minimize losses. The PDIC provides a vital 
link between the numerous highly specialized resources and faculty members at NCSU and 
the practical plant problems in the field. New or unusual outbreaks of plant diseases and 
insects can be quickly detected through the PDIC. 

PRECISION ENGINEERING CENTER 

Thomas A. Dow, Director 

The Precision Engineering Center, established in 1982, is a multidisciplinary research 
and graduate education program dedicated to providing new technology for high precision 
manufacturing. Current work involves the fabrication and assembly of optical systems 
used in such products as cameras, copy machines, laser bar-code scanners, and compact 
audio discs. Progress in precision is largely due to improvements in the ability to measure 
and control using high speed digital computers. The Precision Engineering Center 
attempts to integrate the measurement function into the manufacturing process. Skilled 
faculty, combined with government and industry support help the center develop new 
products that boost productivity and improve the manufacturing base of the country. 



298 



REPRODUCTIVE PHYSIOLOGY RESEARCH LABORATORY 

L. S. Bull. Director 

The Reproductive Physiology Research Laboratory, administered through the Depart- 
ment of Animal Science, conducts research on animals used in studies on reproduction. 
Facilities and equipment are available for surgery, in vitro growth of embryos, micromani- 
pulation and transfer of embryos between females. Recent emphasis has been on teaching 
and research in the area of mammalian biotechnology. 

SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM 

B. J. Copeland, Director 

The University of North Carolina Sea Grant College Program is a state/federal partner- 
ship program involving all campuses of the UNC system. A majority of its activities, 
however, are conducted at N.C. State University. Sea Grant combines the university's 
expertise in research, extension and education to focus on practical solutions to coastal 
problems. Graduate and undergraduate research opportunities rest with individual pro- 
ject directors on campus and with a special fellowship program administered by the 
program office. 

SOUTHEASTERN PLANT ENVIRONMENT LABORATORY- 
PHYTOTRON 

R. J. Downs, Director 

The Southeastern Plant Laboratory, commonly called a phytotron, is a laboratory espe- 
cially designed for research dealing with the response of biological organisms to their 
environment. The high degree of control makes it possible to duplicate any climate from 
tropical rain forests to arid desert. 

The North Carolina State unit concentrates on applied and basic research related to 
agricultural problems encountered in the southeastern United States, However, the ability 
to control all phases of the environment allows inclusion of research dealing with all aspects 
of plant science. 

The facilities are available to the resident research staff, participants in North Carolina 
State's graduate research program and to domestic and foreign visiting scientists. 

TRIANGLE UNIVERSITIES NUCLEAR LABORATORY 

E. G. Bilpuch, Director 

TUNL is a laboratory for research in nuclear physics. Located on the campus of Duke 
University in Durham, the laboratory is staffed and operated by faculty members and 
students from the physics departments of Duke University, the University of North Caro- 
lina at Chapel Hill, and North Carolina State University. A variety of pure and applied 
research is performed, at lower energies with a small accelerator, and up to 17 MeV with a 
Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. Extensive supporting facilities are available: on-line 
computers, polarized targets, polarized and pulsed beams, and ultra-high beam energy 
resolution. There is extensive collaboration with the numerous domestic and foreign visit- 
ing scientists. 

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

D. H. Moreau. Director 

The Water Resources Research Institute is a unit of the University of North Carolina 
System and is located on the campus of North Carolina State University. 

The institute was established to promote a multi-disciplinary attack on water problems, 
to develop and support research in response to the needs of North Carolina, to encourage 



299 



stren^hened educational programs in water resources, to coordinate research and educa- 
tional programs dealing with water resources, and to provide a link between the state and 
federal water resources agencies and related interests in the university. 

Research and educational activities are conducted through established departments and 
schools of the university system. All senior colleges and universities of North Carolina are 
eligible to participate in the institute's research program. 



University Development 

John T. Kanipe, Jr., Vice Chancellor for University Development 

H. Ken DeDominicis, Associate Vice Chancellor for University Development 

The Office of University Development is the principal private fund-raising division of the 
university. It embraces the work of the Board of Trustees of the Endowment Fund, the 
NCSU Alumni Association, and thirteen University affiliated private support organi- 
zations. 

The Board of Trustees of the Endowment Fund of North Carolina State 
University 

The Board of Trustees of the Endowment Fund was established under the Legislative Act 
creating The University of North Carolina System October 30, 1971. The Board is charged 
with administering bequests, donations and gifts to the University. 

N.C. Agricultural Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina Agricultural Foundation, Inc., renders financial assistance in the 
development of strong teaching, research and extension programs in agriculture through 
the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at North Carolina State University. 

N.C. Dairy Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina Dairy Foundation, Inc., promotes and improves all phases of dairy- 
ing in North Carolina through education, research and extension. A 48-member board of 
directors handles the affairs of the foundation. These directors represent distributors, 
producers, and jobbers. 

N.C. Engineering Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina Engineering Foundation, Inc., gives financial assistance to the 
programs in the College of Engineering. 

N.C. Forestry Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina Forestry Foundation, Inc., was incorporated April 15, 1929. The 
foundation manages the Hofmann Forest (consisting of about 80,000 acres in Jones and 
Onslow counties), which is used as a demonstration and research laboratory for the College 
of Forest Resources at North Carolina State University. 

N.C. Physical and Mathematical Sciences Foundation, Inc. 

The College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences shared private support with the 
College of Engineering from the North Carolina Engineering Foundation for its first 25 
years. On April 11, 1983, the Physical and Mathematical Sciences Foundation, Inc. was 
organized for the exclusive enhancement of the College of Physical and Mathematical 
Sciences' teaching, research, and public service programs. 

300 



N.C. Textile Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina Textile Foundation, Inc., was formed to promote the development of 
the College of Textiles, and was incorporated December 31, 1942. Funds for this foundation 
have been raised largely from textile fiber and apparel industries, individuals, and other 
corporations and industries closely allied with these industries. 

N.C. Tobacco Foundation, Inc. 

This foundation was organized in 1975 to enhance the state's long-established and highly 
successful tobacco improvement program. The foundation provides the means for agricul- 
tural leaders to invest in N.C. State tobacco research and extension activities. 

N.C. Veterinary Medical Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina Veterinary Medical Foundation, Inc., was formed May 18, 1978. 
Foundation funds are used to support the educational, research, and community service 
activities of the new College of Veterinary Medicine at North Carolina State University. 

N.C. 4-H Development Fund, Inc. 

The North Carolina 4-H Development Fund, Inc., was organized in 1959. Four-H Devel- 
opment Fund monies are used to promote and advance all areas of 4-H Club work in North 
Carolina. 

North Carolina State Alumni Association 

The NCSU Alumni Association is committed to maintaining contact between the Uni- 
versity and its alumni, and to raising funds for the University's advancement through 
individual alumni contributions. 

North Carolina State University Education Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina State University Education Foundation, Inc., was chartered on 
October 20, 1972. The foundation's principal purpose is to support through private funds 
the teaching, research, and extension programs of the College of Education and Psychology 
at North Carolina State University. 

North Carolina State University Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina State University Foundation, Inc., was organized December 11, 
1942, to foster and promote the general welfare of North Carolina State University and to 
receive and administer gifts and donations for such purposes. 

North Carolina State University Humanities Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina State University Humanities Foundation, Inc., was officially incor- 
porated on May 15, 1974. The foundation's objectives are to aid and promote, by financial 
assistance and otherwise, all types of education and research in the College of Humanities 
and Social Sciences at North Carolina State University. 

North Carolina State University Parents' Association 

This support organization provides a forum for the expression of ideas and concerns from 
the parents to the administration of the University. 

North Carolina State University School of Design Foundation, Inc. 

The North Carolina State University School of Design Foundation, Inc., was organized in 
January 1949. Foundation funds are used for the promotion and advancement of the School 
of Design at North Carolina State University. 

301 



The Pulp and Paper Foundation, Inc. 

The Pulp and Paper Foundation, Inc., was incorporated December 19, 1954, by the 
leadership of the Southern pulp and paper mills to support the program of pulp and paper 
technology in the College of Forest Resources. 



University Relations 

Albert B. Lanier, Jr., Vice Chancellor University Relations 

The Office of University Relations plans and directs NCSU's public relations and institu- 
tional communications program with the goal of building public understanding and sup- 
port of the University. It coordinates and supports the marketing and communications 
activities of the colleges, schools, and administrative divisions. University Relations incor- 
porates the Office of Information Services and Broadcast Services, and the Public Relations 
Advisory Committee. 

OFFICE OF INFORMATION SERVICES 

Lucy Coulbourn, Director 

The Office of Information Services oversees the areas of media relations, public informa- 
tion and University publications. In its role as a news service it provides news and feature 
materials to media about the academic programs, research and extension activities and the 
activities of students and faculty. Information Services is charged with the responsibility 
for communicating to the public through the media of the state and the nation, the many 
dimensions of the University and its contribution to the general public welfare. Among its 
many publications are Statelog, sent to some 70,000 alumni and other University sup- 
porters, and The Journal, a publication for faculty and staff. 

The office is located temporarily at 219 Oberlin Road. 

OFFICE OF BROADCAST SERVICES 

Robert S. Cairns, Director 

The Office of Broadcast Services produces broadcast radio and television materials for 
distribution to regional and national stations and networks. Broadcast Services works 
closely with the Office of Information Services and the coordinator of Electronic Media. 
The office develops and produces video news releases, television public service announce- 
ments and the University video magazine as well as special projects highlighting academic 
and research accomplishments throughout the University. 

The office is located in Tompkins Hall. 

The University Closed Circuit Program, a maintenance and repair facility for campus 
television equipment, is housed in D. H. Hill Library and is a part of the Office of Broadcast 
Services. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE 

An advisory committee of lay leaders, a number representing various media, the Public 
Relations Committee assists the University administration and the Development Board in 
assessing and conducting public relations. 



302 



The Alumni Association 

Bryce R. Younts, Director of Alumni Relations 

The NCSU Alumni Association, a non-profit organization administered by the staff of the 
Office of Alumni Relations, functions to maintain ties between North Carolina State 
University and its alumni and to promote the progress of the University. 

The office's duties to alumni are to maintain alumni records; communicate with alumni 
through various publications: organize alumni activities such as reunions, tours, area 
meetings and special events; and inform alumni of educational opportunities and other 
services available to them from their alma mater. 

For the University, the Office of Alumni Relations administers programs of University 
support and, in conjunction with the Alumni Association, conducts the annual Alumni 
Loyalty Fund campaign. 

To the students of NCSU, the work of Alumni Relations and the Alumni Association 
means merit and need-based scholarships, including the prestigious John T. Caldwell 
Alumni Scholars Program, student loans, assistance for academically related student 
activities, sponsorship of the N.C. State Student Alumni Associates and special services to 
freshmen and graduating seniors. 

For the faculty of NCSU, private support efforts provide professorships as well as 
teaching, extension and research awards. 

Library support and a University Advancement Fund are also part of the NCSU support 
program made possible by the Alumni Association and administered through the Office of 
Alumni Relations. 

The main vehicle of communication between North Carolina State University and its 
alumni is the North Carolina State Alumni Magazine, published five times a year by the 
Alumni Association. In addition to providing the traditional news of alumni and campus 
events, the magazine's aim is to entertain and inform readers by covering the views, 
challenges and achievements of NCSU people and by examining issues that relate to public 
affairs and higher education. 

Membership in the NCSU Alumni Association is open to all former students, regardless 
of their length of stay at N.C. State. Associate membership is available to all friends of the 
University. 

Students and parents are invited to visit the Office of Alumni Relations, located in the 
Alumni Memorial Building on Pullen Road. To inquire about programs of service, call 
1-919-737-3375 or 1-800-NCS-ALUM; or write the NCSU Office of Alumni Relations, Box 
7503, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7503. 



303 




North Carolina 
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

The course descriptions are arranged first in alphabetical order according to course 
prefix reflecting the department or discipline of the course. Some courses are cross-listed, 
indicating that they are offered in two or more departments or disciplines. Within each of 
the prefix groups, the course descriptions are arranged by course number: numbers 
100-299 are courses intended primarily for freshmen and sophomores; numbers 300-499 
are courses intended primarily for juniors and seniors; numbers 490-498 are seminar, 
project, or special topics courses; number 499 is for undergraduate research. 

This section contains all undergraduate courses, 100-level through 400-level, approved 
for the 1991 Spring Semester. It also contains selected 500-level graduate courses which are 
available to advanced undergraduates who have the required prerequisites. It does not 
contain any 600-level courses which are available to graduate students only. For a complete 
listing of 500- and 600-level courses, see the Graduate Catalog. 

A typical course description shows the prefix, number, and title followed by prerequisite, 
credit, and offering information. Prerequisites are courses or levels of achievement that a 
student is expected to have completed successfully prior to enrolling in a course. Corequi- 
sites are courses which should be taken concurrently by students who have not previously 
completed the corequisites. Prerequisites and corequisites for a given course may be 
waived by the instructor of the course or section. It is the student's responsibility to satisfy 
prerequisites, or obtain from the instructor written waiver of prerequisites, for any course 
in which he or she may enroll. Failure to satisfy prerequisites may result in removal from 
enrollment in the course. Consent of the department is required for all practicum and 
individual special topics or special problems courses as well as internships and thesis or 
dissertation research. Some courses also have restrictive statements, such as "Credit in 
both MA 141 and MA 131 is not allowed." Restrictive statements for a given course may be 
waived only by a college dean. 

An example of credit information is: 4(3-2) F, S, Sum. The 4 indicates the number of 
semester hours credit awarded for satisfactory completion of the course. The (3-2) normally 
indicates that the course meets for three hours of lecture or seminar each week and for two 
hours of laboratory, problem, or studio work each week. Some courses are offered for 
variable credit, and a listing of 1-6 indicates that from one to six semester hours of credit 
may be earned as arranged by the department offering the course. 

Offering information is shown as F, S, Sum, Alt. yrs. F indicates that the course is 
normally offered in the Fall Semester, S indicates the Spring Semester, and Sum. indicates 
the Summer Sessions. Alt. yrs. indicates the course is normally offered in alternate years. 
The absence of offering information indicates that there is no fixed pattern, and students 
should check with the department concerning when a particular course will be offered. 

Other abbreviations used in the course descriptions are: CI, consent of instructor 
required; grad., graduate; undergrad., undergraduate; sr., senior; jr., junior; soph., sopho- 
more; fr., freshman; lab., laboratory; lect., lecture; and sem., seminar. 



CONTENTS 






AC 


Agricultural Communications 


BS 


Biological Sciences 


ACC 


Accounting 


CE 


Civil Engineering 


ALS 


Agriculture and Life 


CFR 


Forest Resources 




Sciences 


CH 


Chemistry 


ANS 


Animal Science 


CHE 


Chemical Engineering 


ANT 


Anthropology 


CL 


Comparative Literature 


ARC 


Architecture 


COM 


Communication 


AS 


Aerospace Studies 


CS 


Crop Science 


BAE 


Biological and 


CSC 


Computer Science 




Agricultural Engineering 


DF 


Design Fundamentals 


BCH 


Biochemistry 


DN 


Design 


BMA 


Biomathematics 


E 


Engineering 


BO 


Botany 


EAC 


Adult and Community 
College Education 



314 



Agricultural and Resource 


MA 


Mathematics 


Economics: Business 


MAE 


Mechanical and Aerospace 


Management; Economics 




Engineering 


Counselor Education 


MAT 


Materials Science and 


Electrical and Computer 




Engineering 


Engineering 


MB 


Microbiology 


Curriculum and Instruction 


MDS 


Multidisciplinary Studies 


Education 


MEA 


Marine, Earth, and 


Educational Leadership 




Atmospheric Sciences 


and Program Evaluation 


MS 


Military Science 


Mathematics/Science 


MUS 


Music 


Education 


NE 


Nuclear Engineering 


English 


NS 


Naval Science 


Entomology 


NTR 


Nutrition 


Occupational Education 


OR 


Operations Research 


Foreign Languages and 


PA 


Public Administration 


Literatures 


PD 


Product Design 


Chinese Language and 


PE 


Physical Education 


Literature 


PHI 


Philosophy 


English for Foreign 


PHY 


Physiology 


Students 


PM 


Pest Management 


French Language and 


PMS 


Physical and Mathematical 


Literature 




Sciences 


German Language and 


PO 


Poultry Science 


Literature 


PP 


Plant Pathology 


Hebrew Language and 


PS 


Political Science 


Literature 


PSY 


Psychology 


Italian Language and 


PY 


Physics 


Literature 


REL 


Religion 


Japanese Language and 


RRA 


Recreation Resources 


Literature 




Administration 


Swahili (Kiswahili) 


SOC 


Sociology 


Language and Literature 


SP 


Speech-Communication 


Portuguese Language and 


SSC 


Soil Science 


Literature 


ST 


Statistics 


Russian Language and 


SW 


Social Work 


Literature 


T 


Textiles 


Spanish Language and 


TAM 


Textile and Apparel 


Literature 




Management 


Forestry 


TO 


Textile Chemistry 


Food Science 


TE 


Textile Engineering 


Fisheries and Wildlife 


TED 


Technology Education 


Sciences 


TOX 


Toxicology 


Graphic Communications 


TS 


Textile Science 


Genetics 


TT 


Textile Technology 


Greek Language and 


UNI 


University Studies 


Literature 


VD 


Visual Design 


History of Art 


VMA 


Anatomy, Physiological Sciences 


History 




& Radiology 


Horticultural Science 


VMC 


Companion Animal and Special 


Humanities and Social 




Species Medicine 


Sciences 


VMF 


Food Animal and Equine 


Industrial Arts 




Medicine 


Industrial Engineering 


VMM 


Microbiology, Pathology, and 


Landscape Architecture 




Parasitology 


Latin Language and 


VMS 


Veterinary Medical Sciences 


Literature 


WPS 


Wood and Paper Science 




ZO 


Zoology 



315 



AGRICULTURAL COMMUNICATIONS 

AC 31 1 Communication Methods and Media. Preq: ENG 112. 3(3-0) F. Foundational 
frameworks of agricultural communications. The technologies of communication and the 
systematic approach to the development of communication materials. Development of 
applied skills in the areas of design, production, evaluation, and dissemination of informa- 
tion unique to the agriculturist. BOSTICK 

AC 470 Agricultural Communications. Preq: AC 311. Senior Standing. 3(3-0) S. The- 
ory, research and structure of informational techniques and delivery systems designed for 
Agricultural Communications producers and consumers. A study of the traditional to 
current needs and ramifications. BOSTICK 

AC (FW) 485 Natural Resources Advocacy. Preq: ENG 321. (3(2-3) S. Analysis of natural 
resources problems as they affect management agencies and user groups. Development of 
professional attitudes, policies, and skills needed for the management of sensitive natural 
resource issues through application of techniques in the field. Student presentations, 
demonstrations and development of natural resource planning models that integrate bio- 
logical skills with management alternatives and are critiqued by resource field staff. 

Selected 500-level Courses Open to Advanced Undergraduates 

AC 590 Special Topics in Agricultural Communications. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing. 
1-6. 

ACCOUNTING 

(Also see EB-Economics and Business) 

ACC 210 Accounting I— Concepts of Financial Reporting. Credit may not be received 
for both ACC 210 and 280 or 260. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Financial reporting concepts, the 
information generating process, income measurement, resource valuation, corporate 
equity measurement, reporting practices, and the interpretation and analysis of financial 
statements. Basic accounting principles and concepts, the accounting cycle, purchase and 
sale transactions, internal controls dealing with cash, receivables and payables, inven- 
tories, and plant and equipment considerations. 

ACC 220 Accounting II— An Introduction to Managerial Accounting. Preq: ACC 
210. Credit may not be received for both ACC 220 and 280 or 261. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Analysisof 
accounting data that are useful in managerial decision making and in the control and 
evaluation of the decisions made within business organizations. An introduction to basic 
models, financial statement analysis, cost behavior analysis and cost control procedures. 

ACC 280 Managerial Accounting. Credit may not be received for both ACC 280 and 
ACC 210, or 220. 3(3-0)F,S. Principles underlying financial reporting. Analysisof cost and 
other quantitative data for managerial decision making. Focus on uses of accounting 
information. FERRARO 

ACC 310 Intermediate Financial Accounting I. Preq: ACC 210 with grade of C or 
better; ACC 200; Coreq: ACC 220. Credit may not be received for both ACC 310 and 360. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Conceptual framework of financial accounting and application of profes- 
sional standards. Measurement and reporting issues related to cash, accounts receivable 
inventories, operating assets, and intangible's. 

BARTLEY, GRIFFIN. MARSH. THORNE 

ACC 311 Intermediate Financial Accounting II. Preq: ACC 310 with a grade of C or 
better. Credit may not be received for both ACC 311 and 361. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Theory and 
professional standards for analyzing and reporting enterprise liabilities and equities. 
Valuation of liabilities, contingencies, stock transactions, and dividends. Measurement and 
reporting issues related to dilutive securities, leases, and pensions. 

COX. GRIFFIN. ROCKNESS 



316 



ACC 312 Intermediate Financial Accounting III. Preq.ACC 311 with a grade of Cor 
better. Credit may not he received for both ACC 312, ACC JtlO or UOl. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
Complex income measurement and disclosure issues. Valuation and reporting problems 
pertaining to intercorporate investments, specialized revenue recognition, income tax 
allocation, accounting changes and cash flow analysis. Fund accounting for governmental 
units and nonprofit organizations. BARTLEY, COX, FRAZIER 

ACC 320 Managerial Uses of Cost Data. Preq: A CC 220. Credit may not be received for 
both ACC 320 and 262. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Managerial uses of cost data in planning, control- 
ling, and evaluating organizational activities and in making business decisions. Budgeting, 
cost behavior, product costing and pricing, and an introduction to production cost. 

CHEN, RODGERS, WILLIAMS, ZUCKERMAN 

ACC 330 An Introduction To Income Taxation. Preqs: ACC 210 and EB 201. Credit 
may not be received for both ACC 330 and 36Jt. 3(3-0) F,S. Principles and procedures of 
individual and business entity income taxation. Basic definitional tax concepts of income, 
deduction, credit, and gain or loss. Tax research methodology and tax planning techniques. 

CARRAWAY, MESSERE, PEACE, SAWYERS 

ACC 420 Production Cost Analysis and Control. Preq: ACC 320 and EB 350. Credit 
maynotbereceivedforbothACCU20and362. 3(3-0) F,S. Managerial reporting practices for 
producing activities, development and use of cost standards and budgets, and cost measure- 
ment of productive inputs for units of productive outputs. Managerial use of cost data in 
analyzing, planning, and controlling business activity. Consideration of information sys- 
tems and internal controls. ZUCKERMAN 

ACC 430 Advanced Income Tax. Preqs: ACC 310, 330. Credit may not be received for 
both ACC U30 and It.65. 3(3-0). Federal income tax treatment of corporations; partnerships; 
estates; trusts; and profit and loss distributions to shareholders, partners, and beneficia- 
ries. Introduction to wealth transfer taxes and family planning. MESSERE, PEACE 

ACC 440 Accounting Information Systems. Preqs: ACC 200, ACC 3 10, ACC 320, CSC 
200. Credit cannot be received for both ACC 3W and UhO. 3(2-2) F,S. Systems concepts, 
including the theory, principles, and controls inherent in accounting systems analysis, 
design, and development. Subsystems of the total accounting system including sales/re- 
ceivable, purchases/payable, cash receipts, cash disbursements, payroll, inventory, and 
production subsystems. Uses microcomputers. GRIFFIN 

ACC 450 Auditing Financial Information. Preq: ACC 311, EB (ST) 350. Credit may not 
be received for both ACC U50 and U66. 3(3-0) S. Objectives, procedures, practices and theory 
of the examination of financial information; the professional standards and ethical codes of 
the public accounting profession; features of internal control and EDP systems and other 
professional topics including overview of internal and operational auditing and SEC 
requirements; extensive use of professional literature and authoritative pronouncements. 

BUCKLESS, SKENDER 

ACC 460 Advanced Financial Reporting. Preq: ACC 311. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Accounting 
for corporate mergers and acquisitions, consolidated financial statements, partnerships, 
business reorganizations and liquidations. Multinational accounting, segment and interim 
reporting, and SEC disclosure requirements. ROCKNESS, SKENDER, THORNE 

ACC 470 Accounting Theory. Preqs: ACC 312, EB 301, EB (ST) 350. Credit may not be 
received for both ACC Jk70 and U89. 3(3-0) S. Major concepts, problem areas and trends in 
accounting thought and practice, including a review of the most prominent controversies in 
current publications and the most recent relevant pronouncements of professional 
institutions. FRAZIER, WILLIAMS 

ACC 480 Accelerated Survey of Financial and Management Accounting. Credit 
may not be received for both ACC A80 and ACC 220, 280 or If69. Intended for graduate 
students and advanced undergraduates not in Economics and Business. 3(3-0) F. Acceler- 
ated survey of basic concepts underlying accounting in profit-oriented firms: data measure- 
ment, summarization and reporting practices as a background for use of accounting 



317 



information; content of publisiied financial statements; and uses of accounting for man- 
agement decisions in product costing, budgeting, and operations. 

FRAZIER, ROCKNESS 

ACC 490 Senior Seminar in Accounting. Enrollment in this course is restricted to 
accounting majors in their final semester of study. PBS students admitted by permission of 
department head. 3(3-0) S. Integration of financial, managerial, tax, and governmental 
accounting. Application of appropriate accounting methods to problem resolution. 

ROCKNESS, SKENDER 

ACC 495 Special Topics in Accounting. Preq: Consent of Instructor. 1-6. Presentation of 
material not normally available in regular course offerings, or offering of new courses on a 
trial basis. 

ACC 498 Independent Study in Accounting. 1-6. F,S,Sum. Detailed investigation of 
topics of particular interest to advanced undergraduates under faculty direction on a 
tutorial basis. Credits and content determined by faculty member in consultation with 
Associate Department Head. 

Selected 500-Level Course Open to Advanced Undergraduates 

ACC 520 Advanced Management Accounting. Preqs: ACC Jf80, EB (ST) 350 and EB 
501. 3(3-0) S. 

AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES 

ALS 103 Introductory Topics in the Agricultural and Life Sciences. 1(1-0) F,S. Not 
open to seniors. Introduction to scope and objectives of University education. Emphasis on 
sciences, particularly as related to biology and agriculture. Guest lectures, departmental 
programs and career opportunities. GRANT, ORT 

ALS 110 Agriculture and Life Sciences Scholars Forum. Preq: Enrollment limited to 
participants in the Agriculture and Life Sciences Scholars Program. 0(2-0) F. Interdiscipli- 
nary seminar series with presentations by distinguished faculty members and experts 
drawn from technical, academic, business and government communities. Discussions of 
major public issues and topics of contemporary concern. 

ALS 299 Agriculture and Life Sciences Honors Seminar. Enrollment by invitation for 
sophomores or juniors in CALS with GPA 3.25 or higher. 2(2-0) S. A seminar/discussion 
honors course with emphasis on the scientific method; exposure to library, laboratory and 
field research strategies and teaching techniques; acquaintance with training and career 
opportunities in the agricultural and life sciences; participation in two-day, off-campus 
CALS Honors Retreat. 

ALS (HSS) 490 International Seminar. Preq: Junior standing. 1(1-0) S. Cultural, eco- 
nom ic and social aspects of developing countries, focusing on factors involved in change and 
the process of development. FAHMY 

ALS 498 Honors Research or Teaching I. Preqs: ALS 299 & GPA 3.25 or higher. 1-3 
F,S, Sum. A maximum of 6 credits for ALS U98 & ALS Jt99 combined. Honors research or 
teaching for students in Agriculture and Life Sciences. First of a two-course sequence. 
Identification of a project and development of a proposal; literature search, planning, and 
work initiation. 

ALS 499 Honors Research or Teaching II. Preq: ALS ^98 & GPA 3.25 or higher. 2-Jk 
F,S,Sum. A maximum of 6 credits for ALS Jf98 and ALS Jf99 combined. Honors research or 
teaching for students in Agriculture and Life Sciences. Completion of work initiated in 
ALS 498. Analysis of results. Preparation and presentation of written and oral reports. 



318 



ANIMAL SCIENCE 

ANS 100 Perspectives in Animal Science. 1(1-0) F. Discussion of current status of 
animal agriculture, extension and research. Career opportunities and qualifications for 
employment in animal agriculture and related fields. McDOWELL 

ANS 200 Introduction to Animal Science. M3-2) F,S. The fundamental principles of 
animal production. The importance of livestock and livestock products in the human diet 
and in the economy. ESBENSHADE, RAKES 

ANS 201 Techniques of Animal Care. Preq: ANS 200. 2(0-Jf) S. A laboratory course in 
the applied management of beef cattle, dairy cattle, swine and sheep with participatory 
assignments of common techniques utilized in animal production. 

DAVENPORT, RAKES 

ANS 202 Techniques of Horse Care. Preq: ANS 200. 2(0-^) F. A laboratory course 
providing students opportunities to learn applied management skills required in horse 
production. Participatory assignments of common techniques utilized in horse production 
will be emphasized. BARNETT 

ANS (PO) 204 Feeds and Feeding. Preq: Sophomore standing. U{3-S) S. Applied nutri- 
tion of livestock and poultry. Digestion and function of nutrients. Classification, processing 
and use of feedstuffs. Formulation of rations to meet nutritional requirements. Demonstra- 
tions of nutritional deficiencies. RAMSEY 

ANS 210 Microcomputers in Animal Production. Preq: ANS 200. 2(1-2) F,S. Use of 
microcomputers to better understand animal production and management concepts. Word 
processing, spreadsheets, data base management and specialized accounting and planning 
programs. ARMSTRONG, CARUOLO, WILK 

ANS 300 Animal Production Field Study Trip. Preq: ANS 200. 1(0-2) F,S. Animal 
agriculture and related agribusiness in North Carolina. Three-day field trip with fee 
required. 

ANS (FS, NTR) 301 Modern Nutrition. Preq: Sophomore standing. Food science majors 
may use as a free elective only. 3(3-0) F,S. (See NTR— Nutrition.) ASH 

ANS 302 Livestock and Dairy Evaluation. 3(2-3) S. Market classes and grades of beef 
cattle, swine, and sheep are used to study live animal— carcass value interrelationships. 
Breed histories, pedigrees and desirable characteristics of meat and dairy animals are 
discussed. 

ANS 303 Principles of Equine Evaluation. 2(1-3) S. Conformation as it relates to the 
function, performance and soundness of the horse. Breed standards, rules and regulations 
pertaining to evaluation, selection and performance. One or two overnight field trips are 
required. BARNETT 

ANS 308 Advanced Livestock Judging. Preq: ANS 302 or ANS 303. May be repeated 
three times with one credit for each category of livestock covered. Intensive practice in judging 
market and purebred meat animals, dairy cattle, or horses. Extensive field trips. Some 
student expense. 

ANS 310 Basic Horse Husbandry. Cannot svbstitute for ANS UIO in fulfilling depart- 
mental requirements. 3(2-2) F. Basic principles of horse husbandry; origin, breeds and 
functions of horses; basics of feeding, breeding, behavior, disease prevention and manage- 
ment. Field trips. CORNWELL 

ANS 311 Livestock Breeding and Improvement. Preqs: BS 100, ANS 200. 3(3-0) F. 
Principles of genetics applied to the improvement of domestic livestock. Principles of 
inheritance, phenotypic variation, selection response, breeding value estimation, heterosis, 
crossbreeding systems and genetic decisions in livestock production systems. 

McDANIEL 



319 



ANS (FS, PO) 322 Muscle Foods and Eggs. Preq: BS 100. 3(2-3) F. Processing and 
preserving fresh poultry, red meats, seafoods, and eggs. Ante- and post-mortem events as 
they affect quality, yield and compositional characteristics of muscle tissues. BALL 

ANS (FS) 324 Milk and Dairy Products. Preq: BS 100. 2(2-0) F. Composition of milk 
and dairy products, federal standards, raw milk procurement, cleaning and sanitizing and 
quality attributes. HANSEN 

ANS 330 Reproductive Physiology. Preq: Junior Standing. 3(2-3) F. Current concepts 
of reproductive physiology with emphasis on reproduction in farm animals. Anatomical 
and endocrine relationships as influenced by environmental and genetic factors. Manage- 
ment procedures for maximizing reproductive performance. BRITT 

ANS 402 Beef Cattle Management. Pre9.i4iVS ^04 3(2-3) S. Principles and practices of 
production, management and marketing of beef cattle. Modern management practices 
netics. emphasizing the application of principles of genutrition, reproduction and animal 
health. HARVEY 

ANS 403 Swine Management. Preq: ANS 20i. 3(2-3) F. The economic, nutritional, 
genetic, physiological and managerial factors affecting the operation of modern swine 
enterprises. Practices for the commercial producer emphasized. Laboratory trips 
required. ESBENSHADE 

ANS 404 Dairy Cattle Management. Preq: ANS 204. 3(2-3) S. The management of 
economic, nutritional, genetic, and physiological factors that influence the operation of a 
dairy enterprise. WILK 

ANS 405 Lactation. Preq: BS 100. 3(2-3) S. Gross and microscopic anatomy of the 
developing and the mature mammary gland. Physiological processes involved in milk 
secretion and the removal of milk from the gland. Research problem required. 

ANS 406 Sheep Management. Preq: ANS 20U. 3(2-3) S. Alt. yrs. The economic, genetic, 
nutritional, physiological and managerial factors affecting the operation of the modern 
sheep enterprise. POND 

ANS 410 EquineManaigement. Preq: ANS 20J^ or ANS 3 10. 3(2-2) S. Equine anatomy, 
physiology, nutrition, genetics and health. Laboratory emphasis on reproductive manage- 
ment, breeding, problem solving, and management skills. Field trips required. 

CORNWELL 

ANS 412 Applied Animal Breeding. Preg.vlA^S^ii. Students may elect to take 1, 2, 3, or 
U of ANS Jtl2 A, B, C, or D. 1-4 S. Breeding methods for improvement of specific classes of 
livestock presented as a series of mini-courses. ANS 412A, Applied Beef Cattle Breeding; 
ANS 412B, Applied Dairy Cattle Breeding; ANS 412C, Applied Swine Breeding; ANS 
412D, Genetics and Breeding— Selected Topics. 

ANS (NTR, PO) 415 Comparative Nutrition. Preqs: CH 220 or both 221 and 223. 3(3-0) 
F. Principles of nutrition, including the classification of nutrients and the nutrient 
requirements of and species for health, growth, maintenance and productive functions. 

DONALDSON 

ANS (NTR) 419 Human Nutrition in Health and Disease. Preqs: BCH 451, NTR 415 or 
FS 400. 3(3-0) S. (See NTR— Nutrition.) ASH 

ANS 490 Seminar in Animal Science. Preq: Junior standing. 1(1-0) F. Collection, 
evaluation, organization and oral presentation of information in animal science; resume 
writing; interview skills. DAVENPORT 

ANS 492 External Learning Experience. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A learn- 
ing experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework that utilizes 
facilities and resources which are external to the campus. Contact and arrangements with 
prospective employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the 
prospective employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior 
to the experience. 



320 



ANS 493 Special Problems in Animal Science. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A 
learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework that 
utilizes campus facilities and resource. Contact and arrangements with prospective 
employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the prospective 
employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior to the 
experience. 

ANS 495 Special Topics in Animal Science. 1-S F,S,Sum. Offered as needed to present 
material not normally available in regular course offerings or for offering of new courses on 
a trial basis. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

ANS 500 Advanced Ruminant Nutrition. Preq: ANS 204 or ANS 415. 3(3-0) Alt. Sum. 

ANS (PHY) 502 Reproductive Physiology of Vertebrates. Preq: ZO 421. 3(3-0) S. 

ANS (GN) 508 Genetics of Animal Improvement. Preqs: GN 411, ST 511. 3(3-0) S. 

ANS 510 Advanced Livestock Management. Preq: ANS 402 or ANS 403 or ANS 404- 
3(3-0) S. 

ANS (NTR) 516 Quantitative Nutrition. Preq: BCH 451 or NTR (ANS) 415 or NTR 
(ANS) 419 or FS 400. 3(1-6) S. 

ANS 520 Tropical Livestock Production. Preq: Six hours of ANS at 400-level. 3(3-0) F. 

ANS (NTR) 540 Ruminant Physiology and Metabolism. Preqs: BCH 451 or 551, ZO 
421. 3(3-0) F. Alt. yrs. 

ANS (PHY) 580 Mammalian Endocrine Physiology. Preqs: BCH 451, ZO 421. 3(3-0) 
F. 

ANS 590 Topical Problems in Animal Science. Maximum 6 F,S. 

ANTHROPOLOGY 

(Also see SOC-Sociology; SW-Social Work.) 

ANT 251 Physical Anthropology. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Introduction to the study of human 
evolution. Topics include the processes of evolution, human variation and race, behavior 
and morphology of nonhuman primates, and the fossil record. Emphasis is placed on the 
study of human biosocial adaptation, past and present, and on humans as culture-bearing 
primates. 

ANT 252 Cultural Anthropology. 5/'5-0jF,S,SM?n. Comparative study of contemporary 
human culture, social institutions and processes that influence behavior. The range of 
human cultural variation shown throughout the world, including the student's own culture 
system. 

ANT 253 Introduction to Prehistory. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. World-wide survey of origins of 
human society, technology and culture in Old Stone Age, and origins of agriculture, cities, 
and civilizations of the Bronze and Iron Age in Europe, Asia, Africa, and pre-Columbian 
Middle and South America. 

ANT 254 Language and Culture. 3(3-0) F,S. Focuses on the relationship among aspects 
of human language and between aspects of language and culture. Surveys such topics as: 
descriptive and comparative linguistics, structuralism, language and thought, sociolingu- 
istics, bilingualism, culture change and linguistic change. 

ANT(SOC)261 Technology in Society and Culture. 5f5-0jF,S. Processes of social and 

cultural change with focus on role of technological innovation. Cross-cultural emphasis. 
Special attention to role of scientists and engineers in socio-cultural change. Social and 
cultural impact analysis of planned technological change. Topical case studies apply course 
concepts and principles. Includes core sociological concepts, methods, theories. 



321 



ANT 310 Indians of North America. Preq: ANT 252 or ANT 311 or HI 365. 3(3-0). 
Indian peoples and cultures north of the Rio Grande. Theories of origin; selected prehistoric 
cultural manifestations: people and cultures at the time of European contact; concomitants 
and ramifications of post-contact cultural change; and contemporary Indian problems and 
prospects. Eskimos and Aleuts included. 

ANT 311 Archaeology of North America. Preqs: Three hours introductory anthropol- 
ogy or sophomore standing. 3(3-0). Reviews archaeological investigations in North America, 
beginning with the first Stone Age immigrants to cross the Bering Land Bridge and their 
expansion over ^he rest of the North American continent. The diversity of early Eskimo and 
Indian cultures, social and technological developments, and environmental adaptations 
during the 10,000 years prior to European arrival will be studied. 

ANT 325 AndesLTiSouth America. Preqs: 3 hours ANT or HI 215 or HI 216. 3(3-0).The 
societies, cultures, politics, economics and ecology of the Andean countries of South Amer- 
ica (Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador, Chile, Columbia). Special attention to agrarian systems. 

ANT 330 Peoples and Cultures of Africa. Preqs: Three hours cultural anthropology or 
HI 275 or HI 276. 3(3-0) S. African peoples and cultures, especially in sub-Saharan Africa; 
past and present social patterns of indigenous African populations from a cross-cultural 
perspective. 

ANT 373 The Human Fossil Record. Preq: Three hours physical anthropology or 
archaeology. 3(3-0). Analysis of the human fossil record and consideration of alternate 
theories of human evolution. 

ANT (COM, HSS, SP) 392 International and Crosscultural Communications. 3(3-0) 
S. Patterns and problems of verbal and non-verbal forms of crosscultural communication. 
Avoidance and management of cultural conflict arising from awareness of characteristics 
of cross cultural communication. Impact on communication of differing cultural per- 
spectives. 

ANT 416 Research Methods in Cultural Anthropology. Preq: Six hours ANT. 3(3-0). A 
systematic overview of cultural anthropological research methods including designing 
research projects, research techniques, field work methods, and cross-cultural comparison. 
Reviews relevant ethical questions and anthropologists' reports of their own field work. 

ANT 420 Biological Bases for Human Social Behavior. Preq: ANT 251 or 3 hours 
biological sciences. 3(3-0). Relevance and applicability of animal behavior to the study of 
human social behavior. Nature and uniqueness of human behavior in light of social behav- 
ior of animals, particularly the nonhuman primates. 

ANT 460 Urban Anthropology. Preq: ANT 252. 3(3-0). Anthropological study of cities. 
Examination of cross-cultural patterns of behavior in urban areas and adaptive strategies 
that urban dwellers employ. Introduction to major theoretical and methodological 
approaches relevant to an understanding of contemporary urbanization. 

ANT 498 Special Topics in Anthropology. Preq: Six hours ofSOC/ANT 1-6 F,S,Sum. 
Detailed investigation of a special topic in anthropology. Topic and mode of study deter- 
mined by faculty members and students. Also offered as needed for new courses. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

ANT 508 Culture and Personality. Preq: ANT 501 or 6 hours in cultural anthropology. 
3(3-0). 

ANT 511 Anthropological Theory. Preqs: ANT 501 or 6 hours in cultural anthropology. 
3(3-0). 

ANT 512 Applied Anthropology. Preq: ANT 252 or CI. 3(3-0). 



322 



ARCHITECTURE 

(Also see DN — Design.) 

ARC 202 Architectural Design: Environment. Preqs: DF 102, ARC 211, ARC 252, 
Architecture majors. 6(0-9) S. Architectural design studio emphasizing the relationship of 
use, user, environmental context, and climate to building design. 

ARC 211 Natural Systems and Site Design. 3(3-0) F,S. Introduction to thermal, visual, 
and auditory comfort requirements for people and their implications in energy conscious 
architectural design. Site planning and design issues and their relationship to architecture 
case studies of energy conscious design. 

ARC 232 Structures and Materials. 3(2-2) S. Construction materials related to structu- 
ral applications. Theory of structures and introduction to quantitative analysis. Implica- 
tions for design. Historical examples and current practices. Laboratory and field trips 
required. 

ARC 244 History of American Architecture. Does not fulfill humanities elective for 
School of Design students. 3(3-0) S. Survey of American architecture from Colonial times to 
the Second World War. 

ARC 252 Computer Methods in Architecture. Preqs: 6 hours in ARC WO or ARC 202. 
3(2-2) F.S. An introduction to computers and design methods through applications of 
architectural graphics, word processing, and spreadsheet software to architectural design 
decision-making. 

ARC 261 Design Methods. 3(3-0) F. Description, comparison, and testing of methods 
available in design with emphasis on problem-solving techniques. TECTOR 

ARC 263 The Profession of Architecture. 1(1-0) F. Introduction to architecture as a 
profession. Historical evolution of the profession, concepts of professionalism and ethics, 
legal and institutional foundations, and case studies of professional roles in architecture. 

ARC 302 Architectural Design: Technology. Preqs: ARC 202, ARC 232, Architecture 
majors. 6(0-9) S. Architectural design studio emphasizing the nature and use of architectu- 
ral structures, materials, and construction systems in building design. 

ARC 331 Architectural Structures I. Preq: ARC 232 3(2-2) F. Structural design pro- 
cess. Combined role of imposed loads and architectural function in shaping the form of the 
building. Interaction of elements in structural systems containing beams, columns, trusses, 
space frames, slabs, arches, vaults, domes, cables, cable networks, fabrics and diaphrams. 
Case studies emphasized. 

ARC 332 Architectural Structures II. Preq: ARC 331 3(2-2) S. Structural systems 
explored through case studies and design projects. Emphasis on interaction of structural 
elements. Tracing of loads in structural systems. Sizing of tensile elements, columns, 
trusses, and flexural elements. Design and sizing of joints. 

ARC 369 Practicum in Architecture. Preqs: One A rch. Studio/ A rch. majors only. 2 F,S, 
Sum. Credit may be use only in BEDA, B.ARCH, M.ARCH. 400 hours of work experience in 
an architectural office or equivalent work experience in a related discipline. Student 
chooses work setting and must make own arrangements. Work activities must be outlined 
in advance with the employer and with the advice and consent of the Head of the Architec- 
ture Department. Student must document work experience. 

ARC 400 Architectural Design. Preq: Dt 102. 6(0-9) F. Studies in architectural design. 
Projects of many types and scales employed to investigate issues in architecture. Emphasis 
on independent exploration of design values and their implications. 

ARC 402 Architectural Design: History. Preqs: ARC 302, ARC AOO. ARC Uh ARC 
U9U, Architecture majors. 6(0-9) S. Architectural Design Studio emphasizing the role of 
precedent in Architecture. Projects utilize comparative studies of concepts and buildings 
as a basis for design. 



323 



ARC 403 Pregraduate Architectural Design (Series). Track 3 M. ARCH students 
only. Maximum of 2 It credit hours. 6(0-12) F,S. Studies in architectural design to prepare 
students with no formal background for entry into the ARC 600 studio sequence. Studio 
projects deal with typical issues of building design in a range of scales, with an emphasis on 
processes and skills. 

ARC 412 Environmental Control Systems & Site Design. Preq: ARC 211. 3(3-0)S. 
Mechanical and electrical systems for heating, cooling, ventilation, vertical transportation 
and communication. Water and waste, fire safety, and acoustics. Advanced site planning 
and design. 

ARC 432 Architectural Construction Systems. Preq: ARC 232 (Previously ARC 25i). 
3(2-S)F. Building construction systems related to architectural design. Historical and 
current building practices. Implications for design and systems selection. Case studies. 
Field trips are required. 

ARC 441 History of Contemporary Architecture. Preq: Junior standing or DN HI or 
DN H2. 3(3-0) F. A survey and critical examination of modern architecture from its origins 
in 19th century philosophy and technology to the most recent developments in world 
architecture. CLARK 

ARC 451 Illumination and Design. Preq: ARC 253. 3(2-2) S. Principles and design 
methods for the illumination of buildings and their interior spaces. Students employ model 
simulation to explore and evaluate alternative lighting designs for various architectural 
situations. 

RIFKI 

ARC 452 (DN 452) Environmental Control Systems and Design. Preq: ARC 253. 
3(2-2) S. Natural and mechanical systems for heating, cooling and ventilating buildings 
with emphasis on energy conscious design approaches. RIFKI 

ARC 494 Internship in Architecture. Preq: Junior standing in architecture; 3.0 GP A or 
better; and written approval of department head. 3-6 F,S. Supervised field experience in 
architectural offices and organizations. BURNS 

ARC 495 Independent Study in Architecture. Preq: Junior standing in architecture; 
3.0 GPA or better; and approval of department head. 1-3 F,S. Special projects in architecture 
developed under the direction of a faculty member on a tutorial basis. BURNS 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

ARC 501 Professional Architecture Studio I. Preqs: BEDA degree or equivalent and 
CI; 6(0-12). F,S. Design studio investigations aimed at the development of an under- 
standing of the major issues confronting the contemporary architect and at the expanding 
of problem-solving abilities in architectural design. 

ARC 502 Professional Architecture Studio II. Preqs: ARC 501; ARC 510 and CI. 

6(0-12) F,S. Design investigations aimed at the development of an understanding of the 
major issues confronting the contemporary architect and at the expanding of problem- 
solving abilities in architectural design. This is an individualized, final project studio. 

ARC 542 Investigations in Recent World Architecture. Preq: CI. 3(2-1) F. 

ARC 544 Architectural Conservation. Preq: Advanced undergrad. in DN or grad. 

standing. 3(8-0} Alt. S. 

ARC 546 Theory of Building Types. Preq: Two ARC studios. 3(3-0) F. 

ARC 561 The Practice of Architecture. 3(3-0) F. 

ARC 562 Project Processes in Architecture. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing. 3(3-0) S. 

ARC 570 Theory of Urban Form. Preq: Advanced undergrad. 3(3-0) Alt. F. 

ARC 571 Urban Housing. Preq: Advanced undergrad. 3(3-0) S. 

ARC 574 Place and Place Making. Preq: Advanced undergrad. 3(3-0) F,S. 



324 



ARC 581, 582 Conceptual Issues in Architecture and Design. Preq: Grad. standing or 
advanced undergrad. 3(3-0) F,S. 

AEROSPACE STUDIES (AIR FORCE ROTC) 

(Also see MS— Military Science; NS— Naval Science.) 
GENERAL MILITARY COURSES 

AS 121 The Air Force Role in the Department of Defense 1. 1(1-1) F. Initial course in 
the four year Air Force ROTC curriculum. Familiarizes student with the mission, organi- 
zation and doctrine of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. strategic offensive and defensive forces. 
Laboratory corps training provides experience in drill movement, knowledge of customs 
and courtesies, information about Air Force career opportunities, and the life and work of 
the junior officer. 

AS 122 The Air Force Rol^in the Department of Defense 11. 1(1-1) S. Continues study 
of U.S. strategic defensive forces. Familiarizes student with aerospace support forces and 
U.S. general purpose forces, including those of the Army, Navy and Marines. Corps 
training stresses fundamentals needed to capably assume and discharge future responsibili- 
ties in AFROTC and the U.S. Air Force. 

AS 221 The Development of Airpower 1. 1(1-1) F. Airpower from the early years of 
powered flight through World War II. Factors which have prompted research and techno- 
logical change. Events which show the impact of airpower on strategic thought. Corps 
training and laboratory provide experiences designed to develop each student's leadership 
potential and serve as an orientation to active duty. 

AS 222 The Development of Airpower II. 1(1-1) S. Airpower from the end of World 
War II to the present. Emphasis on technological change and the events which show the 
impact of airpower on strategic thought. Corps training and laboratory provide experien- 
ces designed to develop each student's leadership potential and serve as an orientation to 
active duty. 

PROFESSIONAL OFFICER COURSES 

AS 321 Air Force Management and Leadership. Preqs: Four year AFROTC Cadet: 

AS 222. Two-year cadet: Satisfactory completion of six iveeks summer camp. 3(3-1) F. A 
study of management from the point of view of the Air Force junior officer, including the 
subjects of military leadership and military law. Attention given to progressive develop- 
ment of communicative skills needed by junior officers. Practical experience in advanced 
military leadership activities. 

AS 322 Air Force Management and Leadership II. Preq: AS 321. 3(3-1) S. Class and 
laboratory study of and practical experience with management functions in the military 
environment. The planning, organizing, directing, controlling and coordinating functions 
of management; the command and staff functions in advising, problem solving and 
decision-making situations. Emphasis on developing communicative skills, leadership 
abilities and basic knowledge required of an Air Force junior officer. 

AS 421 American Defense Policy I. Preq: AS 322. 3(3-1) F. The role of national security 
forces in contemporary American society. The professional military as it relates to the 
American political and social system. Formulation of military policy is examined in terms 
of international and domestic constraints. A treatment of the development of modern 
defense strategy. The student studies and practices communicative skills. Corps training 
provides for advanced leadership experience. 

AS 422 American Defense Policy II. Preq: AS 1^21. 3(3-1) S. Continues the study of 
national security forces in contemporary American society. Focuses on strategy and man- 
agement of modern conflict and formulation and implementation of U.S. defense policy. 
Brief study of the Air Force Officer classification and assignment system. Students develop 
their communicative skills and participate in advanced leadership situations in corps 
training. 

325 



AS 495 Special Topics in Aerospace Studies. Preq: CI. 2(2-0) F,S. Offered as needed to 
treat new or special subject matter relating to the Department of the Air Force. 

AS 499 Flight Instruction Program Ground School. 0(1-0) F. Develops aeronautical 
knowledge required by the Federal Aviation Administration for private pilots. It familiar- 
izes students with the appropriate general and visual flight rules of Part 91 of the Federal 
Aviation Regulations, obtaining and evaluating of flight weather reports and flight plan- 
ning elements such as plotting courses, estimating time enroute and fuel requirements. 
Required in the Plight Instruction Program (FIP) for Air Force ROTC cadets. 

FIELD TRAINING COURSES 

AFROTC field training is offered during the summer months at selected Air Force bases 
throughout the United States. Students in the four-year program participate in four weeks 
of field training during the summer after their sophomore year. Students applying for 
entry into the two-year program must successfully complete six weeks of field training 
prior to enrollment in AFROTC. 

Major study areas in the four-week field training program include junior officer train- 
ing, aircraft and aircrew indoctrination, career-orientation, survival training, base func- 
tions and Air Force environment, and physical training. 

The six-week field training program covers all four-week training program areas plus all 
of the subject matter received by four-year program cadets during their freshman and 
sophomore years in the Greneral Military Course, including corps training. 

BIOLOGICAL AND AGRICULTURAL 
ENGINEERING 

BAE 151 Elements of Biological and Agricultural Engineering I. Enrollment in 
SBE/SBA. 2(0-5) F. Topics basic to Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Basic sur- 
veying procedures, tool processes, fabrication procedures and properties of materials. 
Demonstrations and laboratory practice. 

BAE 201 Shop Processes and Management. 3(2-3) F,S. Materials, shop processes, 
management and safety practices essential to the operation and maintenance of a mechan- 
ized farm operation or related agricultural industry. Demonstrations and hands-on prac- 
tice through laboratory activity. ROBERSON 

BAE 211 Farm Machinery. 3(2-3) S. Operation, maintenance, and adjustment of farm 
machines. Functional and energy requirements related to economic considerations in 
ownership and efficient operation. BAUGHMAN 

BAE 221 Agricultural Systems I: Microcomputer Applications. Preq: MA 112 or 114. 
3(1-If) F,S. Credit will not be given for both BAE 221 and BAE 2Ifl. Microcomputers and 
their applications to agricultural systems. Hands-on experience with the following soft- 
ware: word processing, electronic spreadsheet, database management and equation solver. 
Term project. DONAHUE 

BAE 222 Agricultural System II: Methodologies and Approaches. 2(0-Jt) S. Systems 
approaches to complex agricultural situations: entering unstructured situations, express- 
ing a problem situation, formulating root definitions and relevant systems, building con- 
ceptual models, comparing models with the real world systems, defining desirable and 
feasible changes in a system, taking action in problem situations. SOWELL 

BAE 241 Computer Applications in Agriculture and Life Sciences. Preq: MA 112 or 
MA 1 IJt. 3(1-U) F,S. An introduction to electronic digital computers with emphasis on small 
low-cost computers and their applications in agriculture and life sciences. DONAHUE 

BAE 252 Elements of Biological and Agricultural Engineering II. Preqs: BAE 151, 
MA 201. U(2-A) S. The traditional subject areas of agricultural engineering will be intro- 
duced and the computer will be used to solve typical problems in each of these areas. 

DONAHUE 



326 



BAE 303 Energy Conversion in Biological Systems. Preqs.BS 100; MA 112 or 102; PY 
205 or 211. 2(2-0) S. Energy transformations and exchanges of plants and animals are 
studied on the basis of physical theories and principles. Discussion of examples in convec- 
tion, conduction, radiation, phase change, muscle work, photosynthesis, respiration and 
concentration of solutions. SUGGS 

BAE 311 Agricultural Power and Machinery. Preqs: CH 101, PY 211 or 221, BAE 

211. 3(2-3) S. Internal combustion engines, gasoline and diesel. Thermodynamic principles 
and their applications to engine cycles, efficiency, design and operation. Fuel electrical, 
cooling, lubrication and other engine systems as needed for practical power production. 
Power trains and hydraulic systems used on farm tractors. BOWERS 

BAE (SSC) 323 Water Management. Preq: Junior standing. 3(2-2) F. Water manage- 
ment principles applied to agriculture; hydrologic cycle, runoff, surface and subsurface 
drainage, soil conservation measures to reduce erosion and sedimentation, irrigation, pond 
construction, open channel flow, water rights, and environmental laws pertaining to water 
management. Emphasis on problem solving. SNEED 

BAE (SSC) 324 Elementary Surveying. Preq: Junior standing. 1(0-3) F. Theory and 
practice of plane surveying to include measuring distances as well as record keeping, 
differential leveling, profile leveling, topographic mapping, stadia surveying, and the use 
of these tools in agricultural applications. SNEED 

BAE 331 Agricultural Systems III: Management Techniques. Preqs: BAE 221, EB 

212. ;;^('i-^yF. Techniques of systems analysis including quantitative economics and project 
management. Emphasis on applications to agriculture and machinery management. 

SOWELL 

BAE 332 Farm Structures. Preq: PY 211 or 221. 3(2-3) S. Environmental relationships, 
design methods, materials, construction procedures and layout practices as they relate to 
current changes in agricultural production techniques. Problem situations relating to farm 
structures are investigated individually by each student in the laboratory. Emphasis on 
relating the theory to current applications. 

BAE 333 Processing Agricultural Products. Preq: PY 212. M3-3). Application of the 
principles of fluid flow, heat transfer, refrigeration, psychrometrics, and materials han- 
dling to the processing of agricultural products. Pump sizing, heat exchanger selection, 
refrigeration analyses, fan sizing, crop drying, and selection of materials handling 
equipment. WILLITS, YOUNG 

BAE 342 Agricultural Processing. Preqs: MA 301, MAE 301, MAE 308. M3-2) S. 
Theory and application of heat and mass transfer to processing of agricultural crops. Topics 
include conduction, convection, radiation psychometrics, thin layer drying, deep-bed dry- 
ing, and continuous-flow drying. Problem sessions will demonstrate principles of air flow, 
fans, pumps, process control, and various drying systems. YOUNG 

BAE 343 Agricultural Electrification. Coreq: PY 212 or 221. 3(3-0) F. Practical and 
efficient use of electrical energy for agricultural and home application. Energy conserva- 
tion, electric rates, farm and house wiring, circuit design, single-phase and three-phase 
distribution systems, electric motors, lighting, space and water heating, electric controls, 
safety and protective devices. BAUGHMAN 

BAE 344 Circuits and Controls. Coreq: PY 212 or 221; BAE 3U3 or ECE 211. 1(0-3) F. 
Applied laboratory covering energy conservation, farm and home wiring, circuit design, 
single-phase and three-phase distribution systems, electric motors, lighting, heating, elect- 
ric controls, safety and protective devices, and home water systems. BAUGHMAN 

BAE 361 Analytical Methods. Preqs: BAE 252. MAE 208, MAE 3U, MA 301. 3(2-2) S. 
Engineering problem solving through studies of topics in mechanical design. Topics 
includekinematicanalysisof linkages, analysis and design/selection of machine structures 
and power transmission components, including hydraulics. STIKELEATHER 



327 



BAE 391 EIectrotechnolog>' in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq: 
ECE 211. S(2-S) F. Fundamental concepts of AC power distribution, grounding, motor 
selection. Basic principles and characteristics of transducers, amplifiers, power supplies, 
and read-out devices in measurement systems. Introduction of concepts for designing relay 
switching. Applications to agricultural problems. McCLURE 

BAE 4 1 1 Farm Power and Machinery. Preqs: CH 1 01; BAE 211; PY211 or 221. 3(2-3) 
S. Internal combustion engines, gasoline and diesel. Thermodynamic principles and their 
application to engine cycles, efficiency, design and operation. Fuel, electrical, cooling, 
lubrication and other engine systems needed for practical power production. Power trains 
and hydraulic systems used on farm tractors. Farm machinery power management 
principles. BOWERS 

BAE 441 Agricultural Systems IV: Modelling and Analysis. Preqs: BAE 331, ST 361, 
3(2-2) F. Basic concepts and methodology of systems modelling and analysis: linear pro- 
gramming, simulation, and export systems. Applications to agricultural problems. 

SOWELL 

BAE 442 Agricultural Systems V: Senior Project. Preqs: BAE 222, BAE UU ENG 

321. SP 110. 2(0-Jt) S. Individual project using systems approaches to address a complex 
situation or problem in agriculture. 

BAE 451 Agricultural Engineering Design I. Preq: Senior standing. Completion of 
junior year BAE requirements in SBE/SBA curriculum. 4(1-6) F. Design concepts are 
applied to current agricultural engineering problems. One major design project is com- 
bined with a variety of case studies and short term design problems. ROHRBACK 

BAE 452 Agricultural Engineering Design II. Preq: BAE It51. 2(0-4) S. Continuation 
of BAE 451. The major design problem solution is evaluated under actual problem condi- 
tions and the student is required to assess the effectiveness of the design. ROHRBACK 

BAE462 Functional Design of Field Machines. Preg.-jB^.&^ei. Coreq:ST361. 3(2-3)S. 
Design of modern farm tractors and field machines that make effective use of energy and 
labor in farm commodities production. Topics include (a) engine cycles, Nebraska test 
procedures, traction efficiencies, rolling resistances, and hitching of tractors and (b) prin- 
ciples and devices used to accomplish functional objectives in tillage, planting, pesticide 
application, and harvesting equipment. BOWERS 

BAE (CHE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs: MA 202 or MA 212, 
PY 212 or PY 208. 3(3-0) S. (See chemical engineering). RICHARDSON 

BAE 471 Soil and Water Engineering. Preqs: BS 100, SSC 200, MAE 308. 4(3-2) F. 
Aspects of hydrology, soil-water-plant relationships, soil and water conservation engineer- 
ing, drainage, irrigation, and agricultural water pollution. Applications of hydraulics, pipe 
flow and open channel flow principles in design of soil and water conservation structures, 
and agricultural water management. WESTERMAN 

BAE 481 Agricultural Structures and Environment. Preqs: BAE 342, MAE 314. 
4(3-3) F. Principles of environmental control and structural analysis are combined with 
biological principles for the design of agricultural structures. Topics include structural 
analysis, load estimation, material selection, fasteners, physiological reactions of animals 
and plants to their environment, applications of heat transfer and psychrometrics in 
calculating ventilation requirements, heating or cooling loads, and farmstead planning. 

BAUGHMAN 

BAE 492 External Learning Experience. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A learn- 
ing experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework that utilizes 
facilities and resources which are external to the campus. Contact and arrangements with 
prospective employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the 
prospective employer, the departmental teachingcoordinator and the academic dean prior 
to the experience. 



328 



BAE 493 Special Problems in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq: 
Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within 
an academic framework that utilizes campus facilities and resources. Contact and arrange- 
ments with prospective employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty 
adviser, the prospective employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the aca- 
demic dean prior to the experience. 

BAE 495 Special Topics in Biological and Agricultural Engineering. Preq: Consent 
of Instructor. IS F.S,Sum. Offered as needed to present new or special Biological and 
Agricultural Engineering subject matter. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

BAE 522 Mechanics of Biological Material. Preq: PY 205, BS 100, MA 2A2. 3(2-2) Alt. 
F. 

BAE 552 Instrumentation for Agricultural Research and Processing. Preqs: ECE 
331, MA 301. 2(1-3) F. 

BAE (CE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. Preq: MB UOl or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. 

BAE (CE) 578 Agricultural Waste Management. Preq: Grad. or advanced undergrad. 

standing. 3(2-3) Alt. F. 

BAE (FS) 585 Food Rheology. Preqs: FS 331 or MAE 3U. 3(2-3) Alt. F. 

BAE 590 Special Problems. Preq: Sr. or grad. standing in biological and agricultural 
engineering. Credits arranged. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

BCH 150 Introductory Biochemical Concepts. Preq: Enrollment limited to freshmen 
and sophomores in BCH, Coreq: CH 101. 2(2-0) S. An introduction to concepts and perspec- 
tives in biochemistry, designed to provide students with an overview of biology at the 
molecular level. 

BCH 451 Introductory Biochemistry. Preq: CH 223. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Introduction to 
the fundamentals of biochemistry, dealing with the chemistry of living organisms, struc- 
tures and interactions of biomolecules. HORTON, KNOPF 

BCH 452 Introductory Biochemistry Laboratory. Preq. or Coreq: BCH 451. 2(1-3) F,S. 
Laboratory experience to complement BCH 451. Basic skills in the use of volumetric 
equipment, spectrophotometers, chromatography, and electrophoresis. Manipulation and 
assay of small quantities of biological materials, and analysis of laboratory data. 

KNOPP 

BCH 453 Introduction to Molecular Biology and Metabolism. Preq: BCH 451. 3(3-0) 
S. Introduction to metabolic relationships (including nitrogen and lipid metabolism), 
molecular biology, and methodologies of recombinant DNA research. OTVOS 

BCH 492 External Learning Experience. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A learn- 
ing experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework that utilizes 
facilities and resources which are external to the campus. Contact and arrangements with 
prospective employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the 
prospective employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and academic dean prior to 
the experience. 

BCH 493 Special Problems in Biochemistry. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A 
learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework that 
utilizes campus facilities and resources. Contact and arrangements with prospective 
employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the prospective 
employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior to the 
experience. 



329 



BCH 495 Special Topics in Biochemistry. 1-3 F,S.Sum. Offered as needed to present 
materials not normally available in regular course offerings or for offering of new courses 
on a trial basis. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

BCH 540 Proteins. Preq: BCH 451 or equivalent 2(2-0) F. 

BCH 541 Nucleic Acids. Preq: BCH U51 or equivalent. 2(2-0) F. 

BCH 542 Metabolism. Preq: BCH J^51 or equivalent. 2(2-0) S. 

BCH 543 Regulation. Preq: BCH U51 or equivalent. 2(2-0) S. 

BCH 552 Experimental Biochemistry. Preq: CH 223; CH 315 recommended; Preq. or 
Coreq: BCH 551. 3(1-6) F. 

BCH 554 Radioisotope Techniques in Biology. Preq: BCH 451 or CI. 2(1-3) Sum. 
BCH 590 Special Topics in Biochemistry. Preq: BCH 451 or equivalent. Credits 
arranged, maximum 3. F,S,Snm. 

BIOMATHEMATICS 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open to Advanced Undergraduates 

BMA (BO) 567 Modeling of Biological Systems. Preq: MA 112. 4(3-2) S, Alt. yrs. 

BMA (MA, ST) 571 Biomathematics I. Preq: Advanced calculus, reasonable background 

in biology or CI. 3(3-0) F. 

BMA (ST, MA) 572 Biomathematics II. Preq: BMA 571. 3(3-0) S. 

BMA (ST, OR) 575 Decision Analytic Modeling. Preqs: MA 421 or ST 421 and ST 507 

or ST 511 or ST 515. 

BMA 591 Special Topics. Preq: CI. Maximum 3. F, Alt. yrs. 

BOTANY 

BO 200 Plant Life. 4(3-3) F,S.Sum. An introduction to the structure, processes, and 
reproduction of higher plants, including the diversity of the plant kingdom and principles 
of inheritance, ecology, and evolution. STUCKY, VAN DYKE 

BO 213 Plants and Civilization. Preqs: BS 100, BS 105 or BO 200. 3(3-0) S. Economic, 
social, political, religious, and medical roles of plants and plant products in human civiliza- 
tion. Foods, beverages, drugs, fibers, oils, latexes, religious symbols and elements. 

BECKMANN 

BO (ZO) 360 Introduction to Ecology. Preq: A 200 level biology course. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
Relationships between organisms and environment, and interactions among organisms. 
Emphasis on basic principles, including energy flow, nutrient cycling, community struc- 
ture and organization, succession, and population dynamics. Ecological consequences of 
human activities. MOZLEY, WENTWORTH 

BO (ZO) 365 Ecology Laboratory. Coreq: BO (ZO) 360. 1(0-3) F.S.Sum. Laboratory 
coordinated with BO (ZO) 360 lecture, illustrates basic principles of environmental mea- 
surement, data analysis, limiting factors, adaptation, biogeography, succession, popula- 
tions, communities, ecosystems, and competition and predation by means of field trips and 
laboratory experiments. MOZLEY, WENTWORTH 

BO 400 Plant Diversity. Preq: BO 200. 4(3-3) F. A comprehensive survey of the vegeta- 
tive and reproductive diversity of the plant kingdom. Emphasis is placed on evolutionary 
trends, adaptive strategies, and bases for assumed phylogenetic relationships, considering 
fossil as well as living forms. HARDIN 



330 



BO 403 Systematic Botainy. Preq: BS 100 orW5 or BO 200. U2-Jk)S. Systematic survey of 
vascular plants, emphasizing terminology, family characteristics, field identification, 
general evolutionary relationships, and mechanisms of plant speciation. HARDIN 

BO 413 Introductory Plant Anatomy. Preq: BO 200. hiS-S) S. Organelles, cells, tissue 
systems, and organs of flowering plants and selected gymnosperms. Microscope use on 
fresh, crvostat. and prepared plant sections. Histochemistry of plant cells and tissues. 

ANDERSON 

BO (ZO) 414 Cell Biology. Preqs: CH223, PY212, ZO20L or 203. 3(3-0) F. (See zoology.) 

BO 42 1 Plant Physiology. Preqs: BS 100, BS 105 or BO 200; one year of college chemistry. 
M3-3) F.S.Sum. Physiology of higher plants with emphasis on structure-function relation- 
ships, water and solute relationships, metabolism, photosynthesis, and nutrition. Plant 
growth and development as influenced bv plant growth regulators and environmental 
factors. FITES, TROYER 

BO 492 External Learning Experience. Preg.Sop/jomores^aHdingr. 1-6 F,S. A learning 
experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework that utilizes 
facilities and resources which are external to the campus. Contact and arrangements with 
prospective employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the 
prospective employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior 
to the experience. 

BO 493 Special Problems in Botany. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A learning 
experience within an academic framework that utilizes campus facilities and resources. 
Contact and arrangements with prospective employers must be initiated by student and 
approved by a faculty adviser, the prospective employer, the departmental teaching co- 
ordinator and the academic dean prior to the experience. 

BO 495 Special Topics in Botany. Preqs: 8 hrs. of Botany courses. 1-6 F,S,Snm. Individ- 
ualized study, under faculty supervision, of botanical topics in the student's area of interest 
and not covered in existing courses. Development of a new course on a trial basis. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

BO 510 Plant Anatomy. Preq: BO 200. M3-3) F. 

BO 522 Advanced Morphology and Phylogeny of Seed Plants. Preq: BO 403. M3-3) F. 
Odd yrs. 

BO 544 Plant Geography. Preqs: BO Jt03, BO (ZO) 360, GN Jailor equivalents. 3(3-0) S. 
Even yrs. 

BO 551 Advanced Plant Physiology I. Preqs: BO U21 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

BO 552 Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preq: BO Jt21 or equivalent and biochemistry. 

3(3-0) S. 

BO 554 Laboratory in Advanced Plant Physiology II. Preq. orcoreq:B0552. 1(0-3) S. 

BO (ZO) 560 Principles of Ecology. Preq: Three semesters of college level biology courses. 
M3-3) F. 

BO 561 Physiological Ecology. Preqs: BO U21 and BO (ZO) 560 or equivalent. M3-3) S. 
Odd yrs. 

BO 565 Plant Community Ecology. Preq: BO (ZO) 560 or BO (ZO) 360 or equivalent 
U3-3) F. 

BO (BMA) 567 Modeling of Biological Systems. Preq: MA 112. U(3-2) F. 

BO (MB) 574 Phycology. Preq: BS 100 or BO 200. 3(l-i) S. Odd yrs. 

BO (MB, PP) 575 The Fungi. Preq: BO 200 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

BO (MB, PP) 576 The Fungi— Lab. Coreq: BO 575. 1(0-3) F. 

BO 590 Topical Problems. Preq: CI. 1-3 F.S. 



331 



BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES 

BS 100 General Biology. Students may not receive credit for both BS 100 and BS 105. 
MS-S) F,S,Siim. Basic principles and concepts of biology, including the structure and 
function of cells and organisms, development, heredity, evolution, and ecology. 

BECKMANN, FEAVER, HANING. LYTLE, PARKER 

BS 105 Biology in the Modern World. For non-science students. Students ynay not receive 
credit for both BS 105 and BS 100. M3-3) F.S. Principles and concepts of biology including 
cellular structure and function, metabolism and energy transformation, homeostasis, 
reproduction, heredity, diversity of life, ecology, evolution and animal behavior. Emphasis 
on human affairs and human examples. MICKLE 

BS 292 Special Topics in Life Science. Preq: Permission of Instructor. 1-3 F,S. Special 
interest courses and trial offerings of new or experimental courses in life science. 

BS 491 Seminar on Professional Development in Biological Sciences. 1(1-0) F. Plan- 
ning and analyzing strategies for professional development in the biological sciences 
utilizing discussion, guest lecturers, and field trips to nearby research laboratories and 
industrial plants. Intended primarily for juniors and seniors in any biological discipline. 

LYTLE 

BS 492 External Learning Experience. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A learning 
experience in agriculture and life sciences within a academic framework that utilizes 
facilities and resources which are external to the campus. Contact and arrangements with 
prospective employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the 
prospective employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior 
to the experience. 

BS 493 Special Problems in Biological Sciences. Preq: Sophomore standing. 1-6 F,S. A 
learning experience in agriculture and life sciences within an academic framework that 
utilizes campus facilities and resources. Contact and arrangements with prospective 
employers must be initiated by student and approved by a faculty adviser, the prospective 
employer, the departmental teaching coordinator and the academic dean prior to the 
experience. 

BS 495 Special Topics in Biology. 1-6 F,S,Sum. Independent study projects in biology 
conducted under the supervision of a faculty member and experimental courses in biologi- 
cal science. Student projects to be selected with the assistance of an appropriate faculty 
member and with the approval of the Coordinator of the Biological Science Program. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

BS 510 Advanced Biology for Secondary Teachers. Preq: Two years of college biology. 

6U-6) Sum. 

BS 590 Special Problems in Biological Instrumentation. Preq: CI. 1-3 F,S. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CE 200 Civil Engineering, Measurements, and Surveys. Preq: CSC 110 or CSC 111, 
MA 2U1. 3(2-3) F.S. The elements of plane surveying, topographical surveying, horizontal 
and vertical curves, construction surveys, earthwork, photogrammetry, property and sub- 
division surveys, route surveying and state coordinate system. GALLER 

CE 202 Computer Applications in Civil Engineering. Preq: MA 2U1. Must be taken not 
later than fifth semester of CE department curriculam (first semester of junior year). 3(2-2) 
F.S, Sum. Introduction to methodical problem solving, emphasizing computer program- 
mirtg with applications in Civil Engineering specialty areas. GALLER 

CE 213 Introduction to Mechanics. Coreq: MA 2^2. Not for CE department majors. 
3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Introductory study of the state of rest or motion of bodies subjected to the 



332 



action of forces. The nature and properties of force systems, free body diagrams, the 
concepts of equilibrium, the motion of particles, the role of Newton's laws, the conserva- 
tional principles in mechanics, and mechanical vibrations. HORIE 

CE 214 Engineering Mechanics-Statics. Preq: PY205; Coreq: MA 2k2. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. 
Basic force concepts and equilibrium analysis; distributed forces; centroids; moments of 
inertia: application to structural elements. BINGHAM 

CE 215 Engineering Mechanics-Dynamics. Preq: A grade of C or better in CE 2H; 
Coreq: MA 2If2. S(S-0)F,S,Sum. Kinematics and kinetics of particles; plane kinematics and 
kinetics of rigid bodies; simple vibrations and selected topics from three-dimensional rigid 
body dynamics, steady and variable mass flow, and orbital motion. ELY 

CE 305 Traftic Engineering. Preq: CE 200. 3(2-2) F,S. Integrated approach to plan- 
ning, design, and operation of transportation systems with an emphasis on highway and 
street systems. Roadwav design, traffic operations and performance, and control systems. 

CRIBBINS, STONE 

CE 313 Mechanics of Solids. Preq: A grade of Cor better in CE2U; Coreq: MA 2U2. 3(3-0) 
F.S,Sum. Elementary analysis of deformable solids subjected to force systems. Concepts of 
stress and strain; one, two and three-dimensional stress-strain relationships for the linear 
elastic solid. Statically determinate and indeterminate axial force, torsion and bending 
members. Stress transformations, pressure vessels, combined loadings. Introduction to 
column buckling. DOUGLAS 

CE 324 Structural Behavior Measurement. Preq: MA T 200; Coreqs: CE 215, CE 325. 
1(0-3) F,S,Sum. Introduction to experimental techniques: strain measurement in structu- 
ral members, strain and displacement measurements in frames and trusses, frequency and 
damping measurements in beams. Where appropriate, experimental results will be 
applied to theoretical predictions. BINGHAM, MATZEN 

CE 325 Structural Analysis. Preqs: CSC 110 or CSC HI and CE 313. 3(3-0) F.S. 
Analysis of internal forces of statically determinate trusses, beams and framed structures. 
Analysis of deformations by methods of virtual work and conjugate beam. Indeterminate 
structural analysis of trusses, beams and rigid frames by force and displacement methods. 

BINGHAM, ELY, SMITH, TUNG 

CE327 Reinforced Concrete Design. Pregs.CE' 525, CE 332. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Behavior, 
strength, and design of reinforced concrete members subjected to moment, shear, and axial 
forces. Introduction to the design of reinforced concrete structures. 

AHMAD, NAU, SCHULTZ, SMITH 

CE 332 Materials of Construction. Preqs: MAT 200 and CSC 110 or CSC 111. 3(2-3) 
F.S. Sum. Manufacture and properties of mineral and bituminous cements and mineral 
aggregates. Mechanical properties and durability of Portland cement concrete, bituminous 
mixtures, masonry units, timber products, and miscellaneous construction materials. 
Materials testing. KHOSLA, LEMING 

CE 333 Properties of Construction Materials. Preq: CE 313. Not open to students 
enrolled in B.S. in Civil Engineering or Civil Engineering-Construction Option programs. 
A student may not receive credit for both CE 332 and CE 333. 3(2-3) F. Manufacture and 
properties of mineral and bituminous cements and mineral aggregates. Mechanical prop- 
erties, durability and testing of portland cement concrete, brick, bituminous mixtures, 
timber products, and steel. KHOSLA 

CE 342 Engineering Behavior of Soils and Foundations. Preq: CE313; Coreq: CE332. 
U3-2) F,S, Sum. Soil properties and mechanics of analysis related to engineering behavior 
of soils. Includes soil identification, classification, index properties, effective stress con- 
cepts, settlement analysis, evaluation of shear strength and bearing capacity, and funda- 
mentals of foundation selection and design. BORDEN, LAMBE, RAHMAN 

CE 367 Mechanical and Electrical Systems in Buildings. Preq: PY 208. 3(3-0) S. 
Introduction to mechanical and electrical systems in building construction. Includes 



333 



H VAC, lighting and electrical systems, focusing on design concepts, equipment application 
and design of the construction process for modern building systems. 

CE 375 Civil Engineering Systems. Preq: CSC 110; Coreqs: MA 3U. 3(3-0) F,S. A broad 
perspective, systematic approach to civil planning, analysis, evaluation and design for 
large scale projects in construction, structures, transportation, water resources and other 
civil engineering areas. GALLER, McDONALD, STONE 

CE 381 Hydraulics Systems Measurements Lab. Coreq: CE 382. 1(0-3) F,S,Smw. 
Introduction to experimental techniques for the analysis of hydraulic systems; measure- 
ment of viscosity, fluid pressures, velocity distributions, flow rates; investigations into the 
friction, momentum transfer, and turbulence on fluid flow. 

CE 382 Hydraulics. Preqs: CE 215, MA 3U1 3(3-0). Fluid properties; mass, energy and 
momentum conservation laws; dimensional analysis and modeling; laminar and turbulent 
flows; surface and form resistance; flow in pipes and open channels; elementary hydrody- 
manics; fluid measurements; characteristics of hydraulic machines. 

AMEiN, McDonald, overton 

CE 383 Hydrology and Urban Water Systems. Preq: CE 382. 3(3-0) F,S. Engineering 
hydrology and design of elements of urban water systems. Applications in stormwater 
collection, channel design, flood control and water supply. Effects of watershed develop- 
ment on quantity and quality of streamflow. FISHER, MALCOM 

CE 400 Transportation Engineering Project. Preqs: CE 375, CE U06. 3(1-4) F,S. 
Integrated team approach to design of major transportation engineering projects. Profes- 
sional topics in transportation engineering practice. CRIBBINS, HORN, STONE 

CE 406 Transportation Systems Engineering. Preq: CE 305. 3(3-0) F,S. Multi-modal 
transportation systems; railroads, airports, highways, and other modes. Planning, analysis, 
and design. Fundamental concepts; supply, demand, flows, impacts, and network optimi- 
zation. STONE 

CE 420 Structural Engineering Project. Preqs: CE 327, CE 375, CE Jt26. 3(2-2) F,S. 
Planning, analysis and design of complete structural systems composed of steel and rein- 
forced concrete. Professional topics in structural engineering practice. NAU, SMITH 

CE 425 Intermediate Structural Analysis. Preq: CE 325. 3(3-0) F,S. A rigorous treat- 
ment, at intermediate level, of indeterminate structural analysis. Coverage includes 
methods for calculating displacements, force and displacement methods of indeterminate 
analysis, approximate methods of indeterminate analysis, Maxwell-Betti reciprocal theo- 
rem, qualitative influence lines, and introduction to structural vibrations. MATZEN 

CE 426 Structural Steel Design. Preq: CE 325. 3(3-0) F,S. Design and behavior of 
structural steel members and their connections subjected to moment, shear, and axial 
forces. Introduction to the design of steel structures. NAU, SCHULTZ, SMITH 

CE 428 Structural Design in Wood. Preq: CE325. 3(3-0) S. Structural behavior of wood 
under loads; design of structural elements in wood; mechanical properties of wood fasteners 
and connections; design projects using clear wood, plywood and glue-laminated wood. 

ZIA 

CE 440 Geotechnical Engineering Project. Preq: CE 375; Coreq: CE U3. 3(1-4) F,S. 
Integrated team approach to major geotechnical engineering projects involving site selec- 
tion, analysis and design of foundations and earth structures, establishment of performance 
criteria, economic analysis, identification of potential construction problems, and matters 
regarding professional practice and ethics. BORDEN, LAMBE, RAHMAN, WAHLS 

CE 443 Seepage, Earth Embankments and Retaining Structures. Preq: CE 342. 
3(3-0) F,S. Review of shear strength concepts; ground water hydraulics; slope stability; 
lateral earth pressure problems; placement of fills. LAMBE 

CE 463 Construction Estimating, Planning and Control. Preq: CSC 110 or HI and 

junior standing. 3(2-3) F,S. Principles of cost engineering, project estimating, bid proce- 
dures, construction cost analysis and control. FARID, JOHNSTON 



334 



CE 464 Legal Aspects of Contracting. Preq: Sr. standing. S(3-0) F,S. Legal aspects of 
contract documents, drawings and specifications; owner-engineer-constructor relation- 
ships and responsibilities; bids and contract performance; labor laws; governmental admin- 
istrative and regulatory agencies; torts; business organizations; ethics and professionalism. 

CE 465 Construction Equipment Methods. Preqs: CE 332 and CSC 110 or 111. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Introduction to construction engineering emphasizing heavy and highway construc- 
tion: the construction industry, contract construction, project planning and scheduling; 
construction equipment, methods and management; safety and environmental health in 
construction. FARID 

CE 466 Building Construction Engineering. Coreq: CE 327. 3(2-2) F,S. An introduc- 
tion to building design and construction including organization and management, the 
building development process, materials and methods of building construction. 

JOHNSTON 

CE 469 Construction Engineering Project. Preqs: CE Jf63; Coreq: CE U6U. For CEC 
and CM students in their last semester. F,S. Integrated approach by student teams to 
design, estimating, planning, scheduling, and management of construction projects. 

CE 480 Water Resources Engineering Project. Preqs: CE 305, CE 3Jt2, CE 375, CE 
383; Coreq: CE USU- 3(1-Jf) F,S. Engineering design of selected projects in water resources 
engineering, involving interactions with other CE specialty areas. Project subjects include 
sitework, floodwater reservoirs, and one selected by the student. Professional topics in 
water resources engineering practice. MALCOM 

CE 484 Water Supply and Waste Water Systems. Preq: CE 383. 3(3-0) F,S. Elements of 
the design of water supply and wastewater disposal systems. 

CHAO, BORDEN 

CE 487 Introduction to Coastal and Ocean Engineering. Preqs: Senior standing and 
CE 382. 3(3-0) S. Introduction to design and analysis of civil engineering projects in the 
ocean and along the coastline. Basic wave mechanics, tides, and ocean dynamics as applied 
to the understanding of coastal erosion control and other marine problems. An optional 
two-day field trip to the North Carolina Outer Banks at a nominal student expense is a 
regular feature of the course. FISHER, OVERTON 

CE 497 Current Topics in Civil Engineering. Preq: Permission of Instructor. l-I^ 
F,S.Sum. Presentation of material not normally available in regular course offerings or 
offering of new courses on a trial basis. Credits and content determined by faculty member 
in consultation with the Department Head. 

CE 498 Special Problems in Civil Engineering. Preq: Sr. standing. 1-4 F,S. Directed 
reading in the literature of civil engineering, introduction to research methodology, 
seminar discussion dealing with special civil engineering topics of current interest. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

CE 501 Transportation Systems Analysis. Preq: CE 406. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 502 Transportation Operations. Preq: CE 406. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 503 Transportation Design. Preq: CE 406. 3(2-3) S. 

CE 504 Water Transportation. Preq: CE 305. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 507 Airphoto Analysis L Preq: Sr. standing. 3(2-3) S. 

CE 511. 512 Continuum Mechanics I, IL Preqs: CE 313 or MAE 314, CE 382 or MAE 
308, MAE 301, MA 405. (511) 3(3-0) F; (512) 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

CE 513 Theory of Elasticity L Preq: CE 313 or MAE 314. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 514 Stress Waves. Preqs: MA 341; CE313orPY411 or MA 401 orMEA 351. 3(3-0) F, 
Alt. Yrs. 

CE 521 Advanced Strength of Materials. Preq: CE 313 or MAE 314. 3(3-0) F. 

335 



CE 522 Elastic Stability. Preqs: CE 521, MA 3J,1, U05. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 524 Analysis and Design of Masonry Structures. Coreq: CE Jt.20. 3(3-0) Alt. F. 

CE 525 Matrix Structural Analysis.Preg; CE U25. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 526 Finite Element Methods for Civil Engineering. Preqs: CE U25 and prior 
programming knowledge. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 527 Analysis and Design of Structures for Dynamic Loads. Preq. or coreq: CE 525. 
3(3-0) F. 

CE 531 Structural Models. Preq: CE ^20. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 534 Plastic Analysis and Design. Preq: CE U20. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 536 Theory and Design of Prestressed Concrete. Coreq: CE U20. 3(3-0) F. 

CE (MEA) 541 Gravity Wave Theory I. Preq: MAE 308 or PYill. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 544 Foundation Engineering. Preq: CE 3Jf2. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 548 Engineering Properties of Soils I. Preq: CE 3U2. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 551 Theory of Concrete Mixtures. Preq: CE 332. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 553 Asphalt and Bituminous Materials. Preq: CE 332. 3(2-3) S. 

CE 555 Highway and Airport Pavement Design. Preq: CE W6 or U3. 3(2-3) F. 

CE 561 Construction Planning and Scheduling. Preq: CE 463. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 562 Construction Productivity. Preq: CE U63 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 566 Building Construction Systems. Preq: CE 466 or CE 420 or grad. standing in 
ARC. 3(3-0) S. 

CE (BAE, MB) 570 Sanitary Microbiology. Preq: MB 401 or equivalent. 3(2-3) S. 

CE 575 Civil Engineering Systems. Preq: MA 405. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 580 Flow in Open Channels. Preq: CE 382. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 582 Coastal Hydrodynamics. Preq: CE 382 or equivalent. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 583 Engineering Aspects of Coastal Processes. Preq: CE 382 or equivalent. Coreq: 
MEA (CE) 541. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 584 Hydraulics of Ground Water. Preq: CE 382 or 342 or equivalent. 3(3-0) S. 

CE 585 Urban Stormwater Management. Preq: CE 383. 3(3-0) F. 

CE 586 Engineering Hydrology. Preq: CE 383. 3(3-0) F, Alt. yrs. 

CE 589 Special Topics in Civil Engineering. 3(3-0) F,S. 

CE 591, 592 Civil Engineering Seminar. 1(1-0) F,S. 

CE 598 Civil Engineering, Projects. 1-6 F,S. 

FOREST RESOURCES 

CFR 1 10-11 1 Forest Resources Scholars Forum. Enrollment limited to participants in 
the Scholars Program. 0(2-0) F,S. Interdisciplinary seminar series with presentations by 
distinguished faculty members and experts drawn from technical, academic, business and 
government communities. Discussions of major public issues and topics of contemporary 
concern. WELLMAN 

CFR 134 Computers in Natural Resources. Freshmen and first semester transfer stu- 
dents only. 1(0-3) F,S. Forestry, wood science, recreation, and natural resource computer 
applications and exercises using word processing, spreadsheets, and database manage- 
ment programs. Introduction to microcomputer operating systems, specific application 
packages, and BASIC computer language. ROISE, STAFF 

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CFR 210-21 1 Forest Resources Scholars Forum. Enrollment limited to participants in 
the Scholars Program. 0(2-0) F,S. Interdisciplinary seminar series with presentations by 
distinguished faculty members and experts drawn from technical, academic, business and 
government communities. Discussions of major public issues and topics of contemporary 
concern. WELLMAN 

CHEMISTRY 

CH 100 Chemistry and Society. Mi-0) F,S,Su7n. Designed to acquaint the non-science 
majors with the basic subject matter of chemistry and to indicate how this knowledge 
relates to their professions. Selected chemical concepts are developed in depth with both 
fundamental principles and practical consequences given nearly equal weight. 

CH 101 General Chemistry I. Preq: MA 111 tvith a grade of Cor better. M3-3) F,S,Sum. 
Fundamental chemical concepts of composition and stoichiometry; atomic structure; bond- 
ing and molecular structure, including stereochemistry; chemical reactions; states of mat- 
ter, including solutions. Should be followed by CH 103, 105, or 107. 

CH 103 General Chemistry II. Preq: CH 101. M3-3) F,S,Sum. Terminal course for 
students in curricula which do not require full-year chemistry courses beyond the freshman 
level. Acid-base reactions, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria, electrochemistry, 
and descriptive aspects of inorganic, organic, nuclear and biochemistry. 

CH 104 Experimental Chemistry. Preq: CH 101; Coreq: CH 105. 1(0-3) F.S.Sum. 
Laboratory supplement to CH 105. Required for CH 105 students who plan to take addi- 
tional chemistry courses. 

CH 105 Chemistry Principles and Applications. Preq: CH 101 with a grade of C or 
better. Credit cannot be received for both CH 105 and either CH 103 or CH 107. 3(3-0) 
F,S,Sum. A continuation of CH 101, intended primarily for engineering students. Empha- 
sis on introductory chemical thermodynamics, equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical 
kinetics, and the application of basic chemical principles to the treatment of organic and 
inorganic systems. CH 105 serves as prerequisite for additional chemistry courses only if 
supplemented by CH 104. 

CH 106 Computer Applications in Chemistry I. Preq: CH major; Coreq: CH 101. 1(0-3) 
F. A supplement to CH 101 laboratory, for chemistry majors. An introduction to the use of 
computers in chemistry for data analysis, graphical data display, report preparation, and 
bibliographic searching. 

CH 107 Principles of Chemistry. Preq: CH 101 with a grade of C or better. U(3-3) F,S. 
Emphasizes detailed quantitative aspects of solution stoichiometry, kinetics, equilibrium, 
electrochemistry and thermodynamics and the treatment of acid-base chemistry. 

CH 108 Computer Applications in Chemistry II. Preqs: CH 106, CH major; Coreq: CH 
107. 1(0-3) S. A supplement to CH 107 laboratory, for chemistry majors. The use of 
computers in mathematical modeling of chemical concepts; applications of computer gra- 
phics to structure drawing, molecular modeling, and scientific illustration. 

CH 21 1 Analytical Chemistry I. Preq: CH 107, CH major; Coreq: CH 108 and PY205. 

Credit is not allowed for both CH211 and CH315. 3(2-3) S. Methods of quantitative analysis 
based on solution chemistry, potentiometry, coulometry and molecular absorption spec- 
troscopy. Statistics of measurement precision. The laboratory emphasizes the precision 
obtainable with both classical and instrumental methods of analytical chemistry and the 
use of computers in chemistry. 

CH 220 Introductory Organic Chemistry. Preqs: CH 103 or 107, or CH lOJt in place of 
105. Credit is not allowed for both CH 220 and CH 221. M3-3) F,S,Sum. A one-semester 
course in the fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Preparation, reactions, and 
physical properties of alkanes, cycloalkanes, alcohols, alkyl halides, aromatic compounds, 
aldehydes, ketones, organic acids, acid derivatives, and amines. 



337 



CH 221 Organic Chemistry I. Preq: CH 107. Credit is not allowed for both CH 220 and 
CH 221. MS-S) F.S,Sum. Firsthalfof two semester sequence in the fundamentals of modern 
organic chemistry. Structure and bonding, stereochemistry, reactivity and synthesis of 
carbon compounds. Detailed coverage of aliphatic hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, and alkyl 
halides. Introduction to spectral techniques. 

CH 223 Organic Chemistry II. Preq: CH 221. M3-3) F.S.Sum. Second half of a two 
semester sequence in modern organic chemistry. Continuation of mechanistic approach to 
reactions and synthesis of organic compounds. Detailed coverage of carbonyl compounds 
(aldehydes, ketones, acids), aromatic chemistry and amines. Spectral techniques employed 
throughout. 

CH 295 Special Problems in Chemistry. Preq: Consent of Department. 1-3 F,S. Special 
topics in chemistry at the early undergraduate level. Trial offerings of new or experimental 
courses in chemistry. 

CH 315 Quantitative Analysis. Preqs: CH 103 or 107, or CH 104-105. Credit is not 
alloived for both CH 21 land CH315. U3-3) F,S,Sum. Fundamental principles and modern 
techniques of chemical analyses: spectrochemical, electrochemical, and volumetric 
methods of analysis, modern chemical instrumentation, and interpretation of data. 

CH 331 Introductory Physical Chemistry. Preqs: CH 103 or 107, or CH 104-105; MA 
241 or 212; PY 205 or PY 211 or PY 221. 4(3-3) F,S. Basic physicochemical principles 
including chemical thermodynamics, physical and chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry 
and reaction kinetics. For students who require only a single semester of physical 
chemistry. 

CH 401 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry I. Coreq: CH431 orCHSSl. 2(2-0) F. Descrip- 
tive chemistry of the elements with particular attention to their reactions in aqueous 
solution. Emphasis on the chemistry of the main group elements and the periodicity of their 
chemical properties. 

CH 402 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory. Coreq: CH 401. 1(0-3) F. A laboratory 
program to accompany CH 401, for B.S. chemistry majors. Synthetic techniques including 
inert atmosphere, electrolysis, high-temperature, and ion-exchange illustrated by applica- 
tion to main-group and transition metal complexes and to other main-group compounds. 

CH 403 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry II. Preq: CH 401. 3(3-0) S. Development and 
application of theoretical principles to the structure and energies of inorganic substances. 
Particular attention to the chemistry of coordination compounds of the transition elements. 

CH 415 Analytical Chemistry II. Preq: CH 211; Coreq: CH 416, CH 433. 3(3-0) F. 
Methods of quantitative analysis based on electronic instrumentation. Discussion of atomic 
spectroscopy, fluorescence, electrochemistry and chromatography as well as statistical 
methods of data handling and experiment design and an introduction to electronic compo- 
nents and chemical transducers. Other topics include immunoassay, surface analysis and 
mass spectroscopy. 

CH 416 Analytical Chemistry Laboratory. Coreq: CH 415. 2(0-6) F. Experiments in 
spectroscopy, electrochemistry, chromatography and electronics; computer applications to 
experimental design and data smoothing. 

CH 428 Qualitative Organic Analysis. Preq: CH 223. 3(1-6) F,S. Introduction to the 
systematic identification and separation of organic compounds by the application of both 
physical and chemical techniques. Infrared and nuclear magnetic spectroscopy, chemical 
classification tests, and the preparation of derivatives are used to acquaint the student with 
organic research methods. 

CH 431 Physical Chemistry I. Preqs: CH 107, MA 24h PY 203 or 208; Coreq: MA 341. 
3(3-1) F,S. An intensive study of physical chemical principles including states of matter, 
classical thermodynamics, physical and chemical equilibria, and electrochemistry. 

CH 433 Physical Chemistry II. Preqs: CH 431, MA 341. Credit may not be claimed for 
both CH 433 and CH 437. 3(3-1). F,S. An intensive study of physical chemical principles 



338 



including molecular spectroscopy, statistical thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, kinetic 
theory, and transport properties. 

CH 434 Physical Chemistry Laboratory. Preq: CH 431; Coreq: CH US3. 2(0-U) F,S. A 
project-oriented course to acquaint students with modern physical chemistry techniques. 
Experiments in chemical thermodynamics, kinetics and molecular structure are carried 
out and analyzed. 

CH 435 Introduction to Quantum Chemistry. Pregs.Mi4 31^1; PY 208 or PY 203. 3(3-0) 
F. An introduction to the basic principles of quantum theory and its application to atomic 
and molecular structure and spectroscopy. 

CH 437 Physical Chemistry for Engineers. Preqs: PY 208, CHE 315, MA 3^1. Credit 
may not be claimed for both CH 433 and CH 437. 4(4-0) F,S. Selected physiochemical 
principles including quantum theory, statistical thermodynamics, kinetic theory, trans- 
port phenomena and rates of chemical reactions. 

CH (TC) 461 Introduction to Fiber-Forming Polymers. Preq: CH 223. 4(3-3) F. (See 
textile chemistry.) 

CH 491 Honors Chemistry. Preq: Senior in Chemistry and admission to Honors Pro- 
gram. 1-3 F,S. Independent study and research projects in chemistry. Honors students 
must register for this course in both Fall and Spring Semesters of their senior year. 

CH 495 Special Topics in Chemistry. Preq: CI. 1-3 F,S. To serve needs not covered by 
existing courses. 

CH 499 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry. Preq: Two years of chemistry and 
departmental approval. Credits Arranged. 1-3 F,S,Sum. Independent investigation of a 
research problem under the supervision of a chemistry faculty member. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

CH 501 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I. Preq: CH 433. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 503 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II. Preq: CH 501. 3(3-0) S. 

CH 515 Chemical Instrumentation. Preq: CH 431; Coreq: CH ill. 3(3-0) S. 

CH 517 Physical Methods of Elemental Trace Analysis. Preq: CH315or3Sl. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 521 Advanced Organic Chemistry I. Preqs: CH 223, 433 or 435. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 525 Physical Methods in Organic Chemistry. Preqs: CH 223 and 433 or 435. 3(3-0) 

S. 

CH 531 Chemical Thermodynamics. Preqs: CH 433, MA 341. 3(3-0) F. 

CH 533 Chemical Kinetics. Preqs: CH 433, MA 341. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

CH 535 Surface Phenomena. Preqs: CH 433, MA 341. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

CH 536 Chemical Spectroscopy. Preq: CH 435. 3(3-0) Alt. S. 

CH 537 Quantum Chemistry. Preqs: MA 341, CH 435 or PY 407. 3(3-0) S. 

CH 539 Colloid Chemistry. Preq: CH 220, 315 or 331, or CI. 3(2-3) Alt. S. 

CH (TC) 562 Physical Chemistry of High Polymers-Bulk Properties. Preq: CH220or 
223, CH 331 or 431. 3(3-0) F. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

CHE 205 Chemical Process Principles. Preqs: MA 241, PY 205, CH 107; Coreq: MA 
242. 4(3-2) F,S,Sum. Engineering methods of treating material balances, stoichiometry, 
phase equilibrium calculations, thermophysics, thermochemistry and the first law of 
thermodynamics. Introduction to computers and a computer language for solving prob- 
lems related to the course material. Initial stages of process design through a comprehen- 
sive case study. 

339 



CHE 225 Chemical Process Systems. Preq: C or better in CHE 205; Coreq: MA 3U. 
3(2-2) F,S,Sum. Introduction to methods of measuring chemical variables, analyzing pro- 
cess data, and formulating mathematical models of process systems. Instrumental mea- 
surement methods. Elementary statistical data analysis. Dynamic process system behav- 
ior. Computer simulation of steady-state and dynamic processes. 

CHE 311 Transport Processes I. Preqs: MA 3U1, PY 208, and a grade of Cor better in 
CHE 205. 3(3-0) F,S. Fundamental aspects of momentum and heat transfer, and the use of 
these fundamentals in solving problems in transport operations. 

CHE312 Transport Processes II. Pre9.Ci/£'5i/;Core(7.C//£'i; 6". 3(3-0) F,S. Funda- 
mental aspects of mass transfer and the use of these basic principles in solving problems in 
transport operations. 

CHE 315 Chemical Process Thermodynamics. Preqs: MA 341, Cor better in CHE 205. 
3(3-0) F.S. Laws of thermodynamics and their application to chemical engineering prob- 
lems, both in theory and in practice. Criteria of equilibrium in physical and chemical 
changes. Behavior of real fluids, including mixtures. 

CHE 316 Thermodynamics of Chemical and Phase Equilibria. Preq: CHE 315. 3(3-0) 
F,S. Systematic study of chemical reaction equilibria and phase equilibrium. Use of 
fugacity, activity and chemical potential concepts for predicting the effect of such variables 
as temperature, pressure on equilibrium compositions. Methods for measuring and esti- 
mating thermodynamic properties important to equilibrium calculation in real systems. 

CHE (MAT) 325 Introduction to Polymeric Materials. Preq: CH 107, MAT 301; Coreq: 
MAT321f. MU-0) F. Fundamental concepts in polymer science and engineering including: 
polymer chemistry, synthesis, physical structure, morphology, structure-property rela- 
tionships, mechanical and thermal behavior, processing, and applications. 

CHE 330 Chemical Engineering Lab I. Preq: CHE 225, CHE 311. 2(0-4) F,S. Labora- 
tory experiments in unit operations of heat transfer and fluid flow. Experimental planning 
and technical report writing are emphasized. 

CHE 331 Chemical Engineering Lab II. Preq: CHE 312, CHE 330. 2(0-4) F.S. Labora- 
tory experiments in mass transfer and reaction kinetics. Experimental planning, technical 
report writing and oral presentations are emphasized. 

CHE 421 Design and Analysis of Unit Operations. Preq: CHE 312. 3(3-0) F,S. Proce- 
dures for sizing unit operations commonly encountered in the chemical process industries. 
Operating characteristics, troubleshooting techniques and economic factors in sizing and 
setting operating variables of these types of equipment will be discussed. 

CHE 425 Process System Analysis and Control. Preq: CHE 225. 3(3-0) S. Dynamic 
analysis and continuous control of chemical engineering processes. Process modeling; 
stability analysis, design and selection of control schemes. Solution of differential equations 
using Laplace transform techniques. 

CHE 446 Design and Analysis of Chemical Reactors. Preq: CHE 315, Coreq: CHE 316. 
3(3-0) F,S. Characterization and measurement of the rates of homogeneous and hetero- 
geneous reactions. Design and analysis of chemical reactors. 

CHE 450 Chemical Engineering Design I. Preq: CHE 312. 3(3-0) F.S. Applications of 
cost accounting, cost estimation for new equipment, manufacturing cost and measures of 
profitability. Use of computer simulation design and cost programs. Procedures for sizing 
unit operations commonly encountered in the chemical process industry. Heuristics for 
selection of separation processes and heat exchanger network synthesis. 

CHE 451 Chemical Engineering Design II. Preqs: CHE 450, CHE 446. 3(2-2) F,S. 
Chemical process design and optimization. The interplay of economic and technical factors 
in process development, site selection, project design, and production management. Com- 
prehensive design problems. 



340 



CHE (BAE) 465 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. Preqs: MA 202 or MA 212, 
PY 208 or PY 212. 3(3-0) S. An introduction to certain engineering concepts and to their 
quantitative application to biomedical problems, such as flow in the cardiovascular and 
respiratory systems, transfer of materials through physiological tissues and membranes, 
and performance of organ replacement and assist devices. 

CHE 495 Seminar in Chemical Engineering. Coreq: Senior standing. 1(1-0) F,S. Pro- 
fessional aspects and topics of current interest. 

CHE 497 Chemical Engineering Projects I. Preqs: Senior standing. 3(0-12) F,S,Sum. 
Introduction to chemical engineering research through experimental, theoretical and 
literature studies. Oral and written presentation of reports. 

CHE 498 Chemical Engineering Projects II. Preqs: Senior standing. 1-3 (0-variable 
3-12) F.S.Sum. Projects in research, design or development in various areas of chemical 
engineering. 

Selected 500-Level Courses Open To Advanced Undergraduates 

CHE 511 Chemical Engineering Process Modeling. Preqs: CHE 311, CHE 327, MA 
3A1. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE 513 Thermodynamics I. Preq: CHE 316. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE 515 Transport Phenomena. Preq: CHE 311. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE 517 Chemical Reaction Engineering. Preq: CHE U6. 3(3-0) S. 

CHE 521 Separation Processes. Preq: CHE 312. 3(3-0) S. 

CHE 525 Chemical Process Control. Preq: CHE ^25. 3(3-0) S. 

CHE (OR) 527 Optimization of Engineering Processes. Preqs: CHE 451 or OR 501, 
FORTRAN programming. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE 543 Technology of Polymers. Preq: CHE 325. 3(3-0) S. 

CHE 551 Biochemical Engineering. Preqs: CHE 312, U6. 3(3-0). 

CHE (TC) 569 Polymers, Surfactants and Colloidal Materials. Preqs: CHE 316, CH 
223. 3(3-0) F. 

CHE (TC) 570 Radiation Chemistry and Technology of Polymeric Systems. Preqs: 
CH 221, U31. 3(3-0) S. 

COMMUNICATION 

COM (SP) 101 Speech Improvement. Not accepted for credit toward Communication 
major. 3(3-0) F.S. Basic processes of speech production. Attention to the student's voice 
quality, articulation, pronunciation, and general vocal expression. Speech improvement; 
help in recognition and reduction of excessive regional dialect. 

COM (SP) 103 Introduction to the Theatre. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Artistic, technical, histori- 
cal, and literary areas of theatre, including acting, directing, design, stagecraft, lighting, 
costuming, makeup, and criticism. 

COM (SP) 1 10 Public Speaking. 3(3-0) F,S,Sum. Research skills, topic selection, speech 
organization, skills in speech delivery. Listening for analysis and evaluation of in-class 
speech presentation. 



341 



COM (SP) 112 Interpersonal Communication. S(S-O) F,S.Sum. Interpersonal com- 
munication competence: self-concept, self-disclosure, active listening, verbal and nonver- 
bal communication, conflict management, and communication change. ANDERSON 

COM (SP) 146 Business and Professional Communication. Communication majors 
may not count COM (SP) H6 in the major. 3(3-0) F.S. The nature of communication theory 
and practice in business and professional settings. Development of individual, dyadic, 
group and organizational communication proficiencies. Supervisory/subordinate and peer 
communication, active listening, group communication, and presentational speaking. 

COM (SP) 190 Introduction to Communication. Communication majors only. 2(2-0) 
F,S. Introduction for majors to the discipline of Communication and the five concentra- 
tions: communication, mass communication, public relations, communication disorders, 
and theatre. 

COM (SP) 200 Introduction to Communication Inquiry. Preg.SPiP0.5C5-0>F.S,SM7n. 

Acquaints speech-communication majors with basic methods and procedures for commun- 
ication inquiry and the reporting of communication research. Topics include how and why 
communication scholars ask questions, kinds of approaches to answering questions, and 
opportunities for utilizing research facilities. Emphasis is given to proper organization and 
style for writing research papers in communication. 

COM (SP) 20 1 Persuasion Theory. 3(3-0) F,S. Impacts of persuasive communication on 
attitudes and behavior. Uses humanistic and social scientific theories to explain the persua- 
sive process. CAMP. RODGERS 

COM (SP) 202 Group Communication. 3(3-0) F